Write descriptions

1. Introduction

To add or update route or area information just click on the links as you browse and enter your contributions.

The information below provides additional information regarding

2. Description fields

Routes and areas have several different description fields that may be edited, depending on the area types. These are listed in the tables below.

Area information
Field Description
Unique Features And Strengths A one line description of what makes this crag great.
Description General description of the crag or area.
Access Issues* Any relevant information relating to land ownership (eg. private or public land, national park, state park, etc), seasonal closures or other issues affecting access.
Approach How to get there- walk time and terrain for cliffs, drive time from nearest major town, public transport options if relevant.
Descent Notes Special instructions describing how to get off one or more routes in the area.
Where To Stay Camping and other accommodation options.
Ethic* Any relevant information regarding the local climbing ethic (eg. Attitudes towards bolting, retro-bolting, use of chalk, chipping holds, etc).
History Information about the development of climbing in the area.

* Access and Ethic information only needs to be entered at the major crag level, it will then be automatically copied down to lower levels.

Route information
Field Description
Principal name The name of the route. If the route has 'AKA' names (see below), the principal name will be the name used in the index.
Also known as (AKA)

Other names for the route. Options are:

  • Alternate- The route sometimes goes by this name.
  • Historical- The route used to go by this name.
  • Language- The route has this name in another language.
  • Offensive- The route sometimes goes by this name which includes offensive language that may not be appropriate for publication in some channels (eg i-phone apps have pretty strict guidelines on offensive language).
Style The style of the route is broadly defined by what sort of gear you're likely to need.
Local grade systems The grade system that is used for interpreting the grade.
Grade The route's grade. Can include stars (eg. '18***'). For multipitch routes you can use commas to separate the grade of each pitch (eg. '18, 15, 17, 18') - the system will assign the highest grade to the route. Can include grade ranges (eg '15-17' or '5.12a-c'). Can include aid and free climbing grades (eg. '5.10a A3'). The system accepts a wide range of grades, pretty much anything you would expect to see in a guidebook.
Registered grade The registered grade for the route. This is the grade that we show for the route in the index. (Appears when you're updating an existing route, but not when you're adding a new one).
Your grade contribution As for grade (above). Use this when updating a route if you don't agree with the registered grade.
Height The height of the route. Use numerals to input this data. The default is meters, use 'ft' to input in feet. (eg. '20' will register as 20m; '20ft' will register as 20ft). For multipitch routes you can use commas to separate the height of each pitch (eg. '30, 25, 20, 25').
Description A description of the route. See below for tips on formatting and writing style.
Pitches The number of pitches. If you use multipitch grades (ie comma separated, see above) then you can leave this field blank and the system will automatically assign the number of pitches.
Bolts The number of bolts.
Top rope flag Indicates that the route has foot access for top-roping.
Project flag Indicates that the route is a project.
Route history
Field Description
Date The date of the first ascent or first free ascent.
Climbers The person or people who made the ascent. Preferred format is first name then second name, using commas to separate climbers (eg. 'Simon Dale, Brendan Heywood')
Diary entry Additional notes re the ascent.

3. Formatting

thecrag allows some basic formatting inside of area and route descriptions. It is based on a very natural text format called Markdown with a few extra twists that we're calling "thecrag Flavored Markdown".

The examples below should show you almost everything you need to create great guides, but if you want more you can check out the Markdown Syntax Guide at Daring Fireball. Please note that we have disabled all header functionality for thecrag Flavored Markdown.

thecrag Flavored Markdown is available for:

  • area descriptions
  • route descriptions
  • ascent comments
  • route history diary entry
  • photo description

Adding paragraphs

Hit 'Enter' twice to create a new paragraph.

Enter text like this:

And it will look like this:

Here is my first paragraph. When I get to the end I'll hit 'Enter' twice.

And then start my next paragraph.

Bulleted lists

Use asterisks ('*') to make a bulleted list. The trick to bullet lists (and numbered lists) is you must leave a blank line before the first bullet point.

Enter text like this:

And it will look like this:

Look after the park:

  • Stick to the paths
  • Don't disturb wildlife
  • Take all your rubbish away with you

Numbered lists

Use numbers 1, 2, 3, etc. You must leave a blank line before the first number item.

Enter text like this:

And it will look like this:

Start at the R end of the base of the buttress.

  1. 43m (12) Up the slab (some fiddly pro) to L facing corner. Up corner to ramp. Belay at top of ramp.
  2. 12m (12) Move around the arete, then up. Airy traverse L around the arete (grovel across or grab the undercling, lean back and find good holds above), and across the front face to belay on the nose.
  3. 20m (12, crux) Diagonally R across the face to a bottomless chimney. Belay at the top of the chimney.

Internal links

Enclose the name of a crag, area or route within double (or single) quotation marks and it will get turned into an internal link when that name appears on the same page. This should work on all pages for routes and areas that match (not case sensitive) within the top level crag. If the route name is a duplicate (eg 'Unknown') then the link will not be made. You can force a match by following the ending quote with '[nodeID]', where nodeID is the node identifier you want to linke to (eg 'Unknown'[12345]).

You may also use route acronyms for sibling routes (eg '2 meters right of RIP', where there is a sibling route called 'Rest in Peace').

Enter text like this:

And it will look like this:

Ironically, the Garra boulders area was discovered by accident by Rob Dixon and Brian Birchall whilst returning from a day at Nettle Buttress. The year was 1975. On this day they completed 'Hope' (16) and 'Charity' (14). Development continued through the following years with one of the best being the classic easy route 'Illusion' (13).

The diagonal crack which is reminiscent of 'Kryptonite Crack' at 'Arapiles'. The tree stump that inspired the name has been destroyed.

External links

Links to external sites and email addresses will be automatically converted. However these should be kept to a minimum.

In most cases external links are only relevant to the web channel, so when we produce printed or iphone guides they become useless. It is better to bring content to the site then link to it so that the information can be properly distributed.

Also using this capability for blatant advertising is not permitted.

External links facility will be under ongoing review and may be discontinued if it is abused or no longer suites thecrag's longer term goals.

Note that the external web address must have whitespace on either side for this feature to work.

Enter text like this:

And it will look like this:

You will find me at www.thecrag.com or http://www.thecrag.com and email me at support@thecrag.com

4. Writing style

A consistent approach to writing route descriptions makes for easier reading. Our thoughts on order and formatting of information within a route description are demonstrated below. Some crags and/or editors will have their own particular style and that's absolutely fine.

Route descriptions

The following is an example of a single pitch route description with comments on a standardised style.

Spray: Subjective information that provides a bit of local colour.

One of the few Werribee routes that deserves the star it was given in the printed guide.

Start/location: For a simple route this may be all that is needed (eg. "The crack 2m L of Bard").

Start 1m L of 'Barbara Streisand'.

Detailed description: A fairly objective description of the route. May include information about the crux, gear required, etc.

Up to flake then straight up the middle of the face. Add points for style if you finish dierct over the middle of the overlap, otherwise finish up Vulcan.

Descent: Usually only required if the descent of the route is different to the descent described in the area information for the cliff or sector.

Step R to descend from Barbara's chains.

Multipitch routes

The following is an example of a multipitch pitch route description with comments on a standardised style.

Number list markdown: Use markdown formatting (see above) to create a numbered list.

Start at the R end of the base of the buttress.

Pitch standard: If possible, start the description for each pitch with the pitch length and the the grade (in brackets).

  1. 43m (12) Up the slab (some fiddly pro) to L facing corner. Up corner to ramp. Belay at top of ramp.

  2. 12m (12) Move around the arete, then up. Airy traverse L around the arete (grovel across or grab the undercling, lean back and find good holds above), and across the front face to belay on the nose.

  3. 20m (12, crux) Diagonally R across the face to a bottomless chimney. Belay at the top of the chimney.

  4. 15m (12) Up the steep juggy line to the Bard Terrace.

  5. 30m (12) Up the bottomless corner then R onto and up the wall.

5. Attribution

Normally when you enter a description it will be submitted under thecrag.com copyright. The system also allows for descriptions to be submitted under third party publishers copyright. In this case the attributed publisher will be the primary owner of the information and thecrag.com will be custodians of that information. thecrag.com will display and distribute the information as a mixed copyright, where the overall document has multiple copyrights and each piece of information a specific copyright.

In order to submit area and route descriptions attributed to a third party publisher that publisher must be set up correctly in the system. When set up there are two ways you can attribute new descriptions to another publisher:

  • Publisher account
  • Working publication

Please note that all of these scenarios involve negotiation with the publisher, and administration set up in the system.

Also note that content attributed to a publisher is owned by the publisher not by thecrag.com.

Publisher account

If your account is set up as a publisher account then your copyright submissions are attributed to that publisher. When a copyright submission is made there will be a field showing the publisher copyright associated with the submission.

Working publication

If a publisher has agreed to have content from a particular publication entered into the system, then you may help with the data entry. To do this we will have to set up your account with a working publication. When set up, every time you enter an area or route description in the publication area you will have the option of attributing it to the publisher.

Even though the publisher has been attributed with the content you will get the Crag Karma points for the data entry.

Public copyright

If no publisher is set up for you to attribute then you will be submitting content under thecrag.com's copyright.

Changing publisher

There are times where descriptions from multiple publishers are available in an area or route. If the content is set to editable then you can update each of these separately by using the 'Select Another Publisher' button.

6. Please respect copyright

If thecrag.com does not have an agreement with the publisher, please respect the publishers copyright. We do not want unsolicited copyright material being added to the site - as well as being illegal it causes all sorts of headaches. You may however submit material based on your own experience and researching several guidebooks, but don't copy out of guidebooks.