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Access issues inherited from Blue Mountains

The Blue Mountains are a World Heritage listed area. The Grose Valley, the cliffs around Katoomba and much of the Narrow Neck peninsula are part of the Blue Mountains National Park which is managed by the NPWS. The Western Escarpment - where most of the climbing is - is Crown Land managed by the BMCC. While the NPWS Plan of Management nominates several locations in the National Park where rock climbing is deemed appropriate, the majority of the climbing remains unacknowledged. To maintain access our best approach is to 'Respect Native Habitat, Tread Softly and Leave No Trace'. Practically all crags are either in National Park or in council reserve: dog owners are reminded that dogs are not allowed in National Parks at any time and fines have been issued, while for crags on council reserve the BMCC leash law requires that dogs be on-leash.


Cross the creek as for Sunny Side, but turn left and walk 50m round the corner to this crag. Take care at the left end, e.g. clip the belayer in, the belay ledge gets quite narrow with a fair drop below.

Ethic inherited from Blue Mountains

Although sport climbing is well entrenched as the most popular form of Blueys climbing, mixed-climbing on gear and bolts has generally been the rule over the long term. Please try to use available natural gear where possible, and do not bolt cracks or potential trad climbs.

Because of the softness of Blue Mountains sandstone, bolting should only be done by those with a solid knowledge of glue-in equipping. A recent fatality serves as a reminder that this is not an area to experiment with bolting.

If you do need to top rope, please do it through your own gear as the wear on the anchors is both difficult and expensive to maintain.

It would be appreciated if brushing of holds becomes part of your climbing routine - do it with a soft bristled brush and never a steel brush!

The removal of vegetation - both from the cliff bases and the climbs - is not seen as beneficial to aesthetics of the environment nor to our access to it. However, the fast growing scrub can conceal walking tracks in mere months, so bringing a pair of secaturs and pruning as you walk is a good way of helping out with the constant task of track maintenance. Some appropriately discreet pruning is a far better alternative then track braiding (which causes far more damage). It's also a good warmup for your forearms!



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Grade Route
25 Darkwing Duck Sport 15m, 8

The far left hand edge of the cliff. Essentially a one sequence wonder with a tricky V4/V5 boulder problem crux in the middle. Clip the first bolt on "How Much is a Duck Worth" then move left and follow the line of bolts with increasing difficulty to the anchors.

Set by Paul Thomson, 2013

FA: Gene Gill, 2013


Scarily loose, should probably finish under the roof.

FA: Megan Turnbull, 2011


Another nice warm up for Duck Wall.

Set 2015

FA: Viona Young, 2015

19 Cygnet Sport 18m

Links Gosling into HMiaDW via the obvious leftward continuation and a few interesting moves in the middle. Climbs well.

FA: LinkUp - Paul Thomson & Jason Lammers, 2013

18 Gosling Sport 12m, 4

Shared first bolt with Duckling and then Left

FA: Jason Lammers & Paul Thomson, 2013

20 Duckling Sport 12m, 4

Shared first bolt with Gosling and then Right.

FA: Jason Lammers & Paul Thomson, 2013

23 Out For A Duck Sport 15m

Nice face to steeper hard glued up finish.

FA: Megan Turnbull, 2011

22 * Barbara Streisand Sport 15m, 9

Start just left of Pluck a Duck. Bouldery start then wanders right and left. Finishes on the white bulge after the first roof.

FA: Wade Stewart & Leah Zerbes, 2015

Set by Wade Stewart, 2015

24 *** Pluck-a-Duck Sport 15m, 10

Superb wall and steep headwall, the last mantle move could be a heart breaker. One of the best 24's at Bell !!

FA: Andrew Duckworth, 2011

26 *** Duck Walk Sport 18m

Sustained and thin technical climbing, one of the best 26's at bell. This route is the full package and should be on your too do list.

FA: Steve Grkovic, 2011

27 ** Quack Attack Sport 15m

The crimpy thin test piece of duck wall, wait for a cool day to try this one. Used to be 28 and is harder if your short.

FA: Steve Grkovic, 2010

23 * Scrooge McDuck Sport 25m

Start up Daffy (22) until back on the jugs after the thin leftward traverse crux, then follow line of bolts immediately leftwards through steepness and with increasing difficulty, finish back right with a tricky move on the headwall.

FFA: Paul Thomson, 2013

22 ** Daffy Sport 20m

Keeps going above the ledge up the little headwall. Good sustained climbing and steeper then it looks.

FA: Ben Lane, 2012

20 Pekin Duck Sport

Links the start of Daffy just before the crux into the top of Lucky Duck via the corner ramp. No extra bolts so expect to hold on tight.

FFA: Ben Jenga, 2014

22 * Lucky Duck Sport 15m, 7

The obvious seam to steepness. A few different ways to do the crux, directly up the seam is the 22 version.

Set by Jason Lammers, 2013

FA: Jason Lammers, 2013


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