Use this Region Guide to easily find and compare Crags.

Table of contents

1. New South Wales and ACT 22,592 routes in Region

Summary:
JFMAMJJASOND
seasonality
Sport, Boulder and other styles

Long/Lat: 147.126996, -32.174898

1.1. Northern Rivers 207 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport, Unknown and other styles

Long/Lat: 153.073030, -28.963259

1.1.1. Urbenville 97 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport, Trad and Unknown

Long/Lat: 152.531220, -28.507652

Description:

Not technically part of Queensland, but we've adopted it as our own. Guide for Crown and Pines available on www.qurank.com

Access Issues:

For access to The Crown only, not the Pines or Vesuvius: It is requested (by the farmer whose land you cross to access the cliff) that you phone him prior to your arrival and seek permission to access The Crown. His name is Mr Jones and his number is (02) 6634 1225. Think of this as a courtesy call which will serve to keep climbers in the good graces of land managers. Please do it. If you should have any problems with this arrangement, post up on qurank.com.

Approach:

Urbenville is in NSW, 150 km south of Brisbane via Beaudesert. Turn R to Rathdowney at the traffic lights in Beaudesert. Through Rathdowney and past spectacular mountain scenery. 'Campbell's Folly', the cliffline just past Palen Creek is particularly awesome-looking, although it resides on private property and is largely chossy. Drive on past Mt Lindsay and into NSW. At Woodenbong, turn L to Tabulam on McPherson Street. It is about 13 km to Urbenville.

1.1.2. Mt. Warning Wollumbin Shield 10 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown, Trad and Aid

Long/Lat: 153.255729, -28.394794

1.1.3. Tweed Valley 1 route in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 153.329274, -28.286091

1.1.4. Old Lismore Quarry 10 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 153.262965, -28.793621

1.1.5. Angel Way 20 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Unknown
Unique Features And Strengths:

climbing is banned in these areas... keep climbing gear in your pack.

Description:

Rock is crumbly

Access Issues:

access difficult.

1.1.6. Lillian Rock 0 routes in Crag

1.1.7. Island Quarry 3 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown and Top Rope

Long/Lat: 153.573690, -28.638788

Unique Features And Strengths:

private land

Description:

there is a no climbing sign now :(

Where To Stay:

Byron Bay

1.1.8. Rainbow Rock 16 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport

Long/Lat: 153.324141, -28.512089

Unique Features And Strengths:

Private Property

Description:

Helmet and brush needed at this crag. Holds appear and disappear often. Needs lots of cleaning. Lots of ticks, march flies, mosquitoes and leeches.

Access Issues:

Across farmers land - must ask permission - private property.

Approach:

Call for details and directions... walk up hill. Very steep at the end. Hard to find.

Ethic:

Sensitive area. Private Property. Permission for climbing or bolting required.

History:

Called Rainbow Rock. First climbs established in 2000 by the owner of Wave Rock, Byron Bay (John Reilly)

1.1.9. Zen 16 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport and Top Rope

1.1.10. Boonoo Boonoo Falls 3 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown and Trad
Description:© (gremlin)

Pronounced Bunna Boonoo.

1.1.11. Surf Rock 26 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad, Top Rope and other styles

Long/Lat: 153.577362, -28.336125

Unique Features And Strengths:

sea cliff, windy. Some loose rock, helmet is a good idea, Some very sharp rock!!! cut though my 11mm rope when top roping an overhang. Use rope protectors over all edges. Most rock is pretty average.

Description:

Mostly Trad climbing.Sea cliff climbing, beautiful location. good surf. A place to climb when on the north coast of NSW... Better than nothing... If you dont like the climbs... go Surfing...

Approach:

Cabarita Beach - Headland... NSW. follow trail out to headland, when on wooden boardwalk climb over fence and head to right side of headland. there are 2 decent gullys, first climbs are in first gully.

Where To Stay:

Cabarita has lots of accomadation.

Ethic:

Using carrots to bolt, they are least noticeable. Headland is public location. Minimal impact to environment is required here.

History:

Found a bolted climb with a chain anchor... Most climbs are probably easier than graded. Grading is my best guess... feel free to adjust grades...

1.2. Mid North Coast 503 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad, Sport and other styles

Long/Lat: 152.568243, -31.149465

1.2.1. Coffs Harbour 503 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad, Sport and other styles

Long/Lat: 153.016657, -30.188363

Unique Features And Strengths:

The Glenreagh area (about 45 minutes NW of Coffs Harbour) offers an extensive sandstone escarpment with more than ten established crags and a variety of climbs from cracks to steep sport routes.

Description:

Although the area is described as 'Coffs Harbour', the majority of the climbing is located near the town of Glenreagh, 45 mins North West of Coffs.

The Glenreagh area offers an extensive sandstone escarpment with more than ten established crags. A summary of the crags is provided in the 'Glenreagh' subsection.

The Coffs Harbour area also includes a climbing area in the Nymboida Gorge, a remote, adventurous, multipitch, granite climbing area that has a challenging walk-in approach or can be accessed by paddling a renowned whitewater river. All of the routes are considered fairly serious undertakings requiring a full rack of traditional gear. The routes are up to 180m in length.

Boambee Headland is near Sawtell. A small cliff offers some bouldering traverses.

Coffs Harbour makes a great destination for combining climbing with a coastal holiday and it is possible to climb in the area year-round (by chasing shaded cliffs). The best temperatures are from about March to October.

Approach:

Half way between Sydney and Brisbane. Most of the crags are only about half an hour west of the Pacific Highway.

Where To Stay:

The nearest bush camping is at the parking lot for Wonderland. Otherwise, the towns of Coffs Harbour, Woolgoolga or any of the other coastal villages offer everything from caravan parks and backpackers hostels to five star resorts. The ability to combine a combine climbing with a beach holiday is hard to beat.

Ethic:

Climbing ethics in the Coffs Harbour area generally follow those of the rest of Australia. The sandstone often offers solid, natural protection which should be used instead of fixed protection where possible. Tape, ribbon, or something similar tied around a bolt or inserted in the route will indicate an incomplete route. Please respect these routes as projects until the marker is removed.

1.3. Hunter Valley 2,670 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport, Unknown and other styles

Long/Lat: 151.367763, -32.402613

Description:

Whether it's bouldering, sport, trad or DWS climbing the Hunter Region has something for everyone. The region covers the Watagans to the west, Central Coast to the south, Bulahdelah to the north and Port Stephens to the East. The Watagans is made up of numerous sandstone cliffs in a National park. Port Stephens has some fantastic sea cliff climbing on quality granite like rock. Bulahdelah is made up of an alum/rhyolite rock. This rock is very stong and lends itself to some interesting featured climbing, inclucing the famous cave. The Central Coast has fine, compacted sandstone with some great sport climbing caves and bouldering areas. Also has some great trad spots along the Hawksbury. For more information see the Hunter Valley Rockclimbing guidebook.

1.3.1. Watagans 473 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 151.438190, -32.975926

Description:

The watagans is made up of sandstone cliffs. West of the F3 freeway this is a national park the cover quite a large area and has numerous cliff inside the NP. The rock can be a little conglomerate in places but if you stick to the worn classic you should enjoy.

Monkey Face is the main area. It is a good place for beginners and is easy to set top ropes. It is often used by the scouts and Newcastle Mountaineering club.

1.3.2. Port Stephens 465 routes in Crag

Summary:
Boulder, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 152.113287, -32.744061

Unique Features And Strengths:

Port Stephens climbing is on fine seaside granite. Most areas require trad gear but there are a few smaller sport crags thrown in. It is a great place to spend a summers day go for a climb and cool off with a swim. Port Stephens also offers a number of DWS crags.

1.3.3. Bulahdelah 379 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 152.223382, -32.412525

Description:

Bring loads of tape. The rock here is as hard as nails... and as sharp as them too. Loads of climbing to be had in all different styles. Almost every pinnacle, butress and wall has been bolted and there are loads of quality climbs to test yourself on.

The rock can feel quite soapy and can be a bit difficult to read causing climbers to look like they are "washing windows" looking for holds.

There are new routes going up all the time and it is important to respect the bolters and keep of all tatted routes.

Access Issues:

Parking can get a bit congested at times so it is best to carpool if possile. If heading to the Goat Cave then do not drive in or park in front of the gate as the neighbouring landowner has indicated he doesn't want cars blocking access to his property. Park to the side of the gate and walk the fire trail.

Approach:

Access to the main areas is constantly changing due to the current roadworks. At the moment turn up Blanch St then into McKenzie and at a state forestry sign cross the new freeway on an overpass. The track to the mountain carpark goes straight up the hill. Unfortunately the rain in March 2013 has caused major damage and forestry is likely and should close this rd until repaired. At present- April 2013- the road has huge potholes and is difficult even for 4WDs. It is best to walk and follow the trail. Take the hairpin bend to the main carpark for Delah walls/ Boiler wall and the pinnacles or the right fork takes you to Argentina and Billy Woods wall.

Where To Stay:

Buladelah has several motels, cheap but basic rooms at the hotel, and a camping ground. Camping also possible in nearby Myall Lakes national park.

Ethic:

If you intend to bolt then it is best to speak to the locals as they will inform you of the do's and don'ts of bolting in the area.

History:

First recorded climbs date from 1980, therehas had a steady stream of routes added ever since, most notably by John Wilde and Vanessa Wills.

1.3.4. Gloucester Buckets 16 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 151.923926, -32.019539

1.3.5. Glenrock Lagoon 44 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport, Boulder and Unknown

Long/Lat: 151.730617, -32.959803

Unique Features And Strengths:

Newcastles only local suburban rope up crag.

Description:

All bolted sport routes. Rock is generally soft sandstone and can be a little fragile. Still worth a visit if you live local and want to get out on the rock without driving 45mins north.

Access Issues:

Located in glenrock state recreational area, inbetween the suburbs of Mereweather and Kahibah/Charlestown.

Approach:

Park in the Burwood Rd car park,

1.3.6. Newcastle 191 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport

Long/Lat: 151.698089, -32.969946

1.3.7. Central Coast 1,094 routes in Region

Summary:
Boulder, Unknown and other styles

Long/Lat: 151.103603, -33.254192

Description:

1.3.8. Upper Hunter 7 routes in Region

Summary:
All Trad

Long/Lat: 151.186137, -32.238508

1.4. Northern Tablelands 1,824 routes in Region

Summary:
Boulder, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 151.765129, -29.951277

1.4.1. Ebor Gorge 181 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 152.340406, -30.402480

Unique Features And Strengths:

Lots of crack and aretes

Description:©

Ebor Falls is part of Guy Fawkes River National Park. All the cliffs are in the National park as is the access to these areas and should thus be treated accordingly. Enough said!

Ebor is a township 77km east of Armidale on the Dorrigo road. The climbing area is just before the town on the Armidale side of the Guy Fawkes river on the cliffs around the falls.

The cliffs consist of short vertical basalt columns (10m - 20m) and virtually all the climbs are sustained cracks of varying size between the columns. The original climbing areas are called ‘Breakaways’ and are numbered 1 to 6 with the first being closest to the falls and the sixth being furthest from the falls.

The more recently developed cliffs have broken with tradition and been given more exotic names so that the very short ‘Dead Heroes Buttress’ is between the 4th and 5th Breakaways, ‘Solid Gold Buttress’ is directly below the left-hand end of the 4th Breakaway and ‘Pub Buttress’ and ‘Bondage Buttress’ are on the other side of the gorge.

Access Issues:©

National Park

Approach:©

Take the Dorrigo road out of Armidale until just before the township of Ebor there is a sign posted road to Ebor falls on your left. Take this road past the graveyard to the first car park (on your right); park here for access to the 1st and 2nd Breakaways, and drive further on to the main car park and picnic area for access to the 3rd - 6th Breakaways, ‘Dead Heroes Buttress’ and ‘Solid Gold Buttress’. To access ‘Pub Buttress’ and ‘Bondage Buttress’ walk across the top of the First Falls and then proceed to the gorge rim on that side of the river.

Where To Stay:©

Camping at the Ebor Falls rest area is banned but you can camp nearby at the Native Dog camping ground. To get there drive west towards Guyra for 12kms. It is part of Cathedral Rock National Park and camp fees apply. It is only an hour’s drive from Armidale so you can easily stay there. There are also an amazing variety of hotels, bed n’ breakfasts, pubs and caravan parks in Armidale.

Ethic:©

Basically, the climbers of Armidale are a prettylaid back, free thinking group and as long as you don’t go out of your way to put people’s noses out of joint you’ll be amazed at how helpful they can be. The quickest way to piss people off is by ripping off projects. There are a few devoted locals making an effort and putting up quality new climbs. A lot of time, hard work and even money goes into their endeavours (cracks can be projects too) and there is too much unclimbed rock around to justify destroying someone else’s motivation. Any routes marked as such or not in the guide should be left alone. The simple courtesy of asking first may save you from being stripped naked and being staked out for the crows to pick your eyes out.

If putting up new routes is your thing then please feel free. However bolting in National Parks is actually illegal and as Ebor is mostly crack climbs there is rarely a need for bolts.

History:©

Ebor holds a rather special place in the history of New England climbing. Due to its pleasant nature, easy access and short well protected climbs it has been an ideal training area where many Armidale climbers have ‘pushed their grades and tested themselves on such classics as ‘Rooflet’ 19, ‘Backdoor Man’ 19, ‘Sleight of Hand’ 19, and ‘Luce’ 21, and as little as about 6 years ago an ascent of any of these test pieces signified your ‘arrival’ into the upper echelon of New England climbers. On the other hand Ebor has broken a lot of hearts. Almost everyone who has climbed there has had at least one of those days when the climbs cease to be inanimate crack lines and become vicious and spiteful beasts, hell bent on seeing you lying on your back on the ground with blood streaming out of your ears. On one such day (in May 1983) after falling off ‘Anxiety Attack’ a few times Paul Colyvan (Animal) in a fit of rage hitchhiked back to Armidale rather than spend a minute longer at the cliff waiting for everyone else to drive back.

Given the extremes of feeling for the place, which is so much a part of the character of the cliff, it is not surprising that the cliff drifts in and out of fashion from time to time. It always manages to attract a few visitors though, even in recent times, when it has been largely overlooked due to its lack of bolt protected wall climbs which are fashionable at present. Considering this lack of interest in recent years it is remarkable that some of New England’s hardest routes are at Ebor, in fact Ebor has always been well represented in the upper grades at any particular point in time and was often the scene of the first climb at a particular grade right from the time of its discovery as a climbing area.

Anyway, the story begins in April 1974, when local, Bob Killip, records the first climb at Ebor on the Third Breakaway, ‘Luce’ 17M1, a thin crack that was aided to a roof which went free. Ironically now that the route is free at 21 the roof is considered about 19 (and some even insist that the roof is the crux). Shortly after that Jill Kelman and Al Stephens also did ‘Haggis Hole’ 13, also on the third breakaway, which was the only other route recorded at Ebor that year, despite Killip’s enthusiasm for the place. In reality Killip would have been climbing near his limit on most climbs at Ebor, since 17 was the highest grade in New England at the time, and no one else was capable of climbing at that standard. So it’s not surprising that development was slow at first, however, the interest was there and it prompted New England climbers to get into crack climbing, a trend which wouldn’t change significantly for nearly 10 years.

In March the following year Killip returned to do ‘Frogwyn D’Harder’ 18 also on the third breakaway, which was New England’s first 18 (although now it is considered 19!). Before that however A1 Stephens and Rob Dixon recorded the first route on the first breakaway in February with ‘Supermouse’ M2 and went on to do a few others on the same breakaway as the year progressed, the best of which is probably ‘The Joker’ 17 led by Dixon. Dixon along with mature age novice Brian Birchall and visiting Queenslander Trevor Gynther also added the first route on the second breakaway with ‘Chunder Chimney’ 12. Also of note from 1975 was Stephens’ route ‘Sundown’ M2 which made the first use of bolts on a climb (for aid) in New England. By the end of 1975 there were still only a total of 13 routes recorded at Ebor. In 1976 Richard Curtis arrived in Armidale and he, like Killip, was keen on hard jam cracks and provided a bit of healthy and friendly competition for Killip, who had dominated Armidale’s hard climbing scene for the past few years. Curtis was particularly keen on Ebor where he added many fine new routes, but the other important thing he was to do was to provide encouragement for Brian Birchall who improved dramatically and also acquired a taste for hard jam cracks such as those found at Ebor. The two teamed up for many first ascents at Ebor and elsewhere such as Kaputar and Gara gorge, although the newly discovered Gara granite areas where neglected somewhat in 1976 for the sake of Ebor. During the year Curtis led the superb ‘Narcissus’ 19 on the First Breakaway, ‘Anxiety Attack’ 19 on the Second Breakaway, freed the Killip route ‘Luce’ 20/21 which was the first climb in new England graded above 20 (it has since been upgraded to 21). That was on the 3rd Breakaway where he also added ‘Prime Cut’ 19/20 with an aid rest, which was overlooked in the description. He also did the testy ‘Knuckleduster’ 18 which was among the first climbs on the Fourth Breakaway. Birchall led ‘Fear and Loathing’ 17 and ‘Rattlesnake’ 18 on the Second Breakaway and the classic ‘Jugular’ 19 (later downgraded to 18) which was the first route recorded on the Fifth Breakaway.

Bob Killip’s only significant contribution at Ebor in 1976 was to steal a route on the 4th breakaway which Curtis had cleaned and not had a chance to climb yet. Killip called the route ‘Rooflet’ 18 (it has since been upgraded to 19). This marked the end of the ‘friendly’ competition between Curtis and Killip. Other routes worth mentioning from 1976 are Jill Kelman’s ‘Double Trouble’ 16 on the 4th Breakaway and Phil Prior’s middle grade classic ‘Caballero’ 14 (since upgraded to 16 after some enthusiastic cleaning years later). The new 2 volume green guide ‘Rockclimbs in New England’ by Bob Killip and Brian Birchall came out in the later part of 1976 and featured 40 routes at Ebor up to grade 19, 27 of which had been added in that year and another 10 were added after the deadline for the guide to bring the years total to 37 new routes and one aid elimination. This was Ebor’s finest hour!

In 1977 Birchall left for Melbourne and Curtis continued on his merry way cleaning up many great climbs at Ebor such as ‘Backdoor Man’ 19 and ‘Sleight of Hand’ 19 on the 4th Breakaway and ‘Affection Injection’ 18 and ‘Bash Street’ 20 on the First Breakaway. He also discovered the 6th Breakaway and did the first easier routes there. Joe Friend arrived in Armidale late in the year and did his only significant routes here, the off width ‘Blinky Bill’ 20 on the First Breakaway and the thin crack ‘Inspiration Point’ 18 on the 5th Breakaway. Killip although still around only made sporadic appearances and led nothing of interest at Ebor in 1977. There were 19 new routes in 1977.

In 1978 both Curtis and Killip left Armidale and Birchall returned from Melbourne but it was Joe Friend who was to dominate the scene in 1978 doing many new routes in Gara Gorge but Ebor apparently didn’t interest him and no new routes were recorded here in 1978.

1979 was a year of general slackness. After Friend left, Birchall was in charge of shop and very little in the way of new routes was done (only 4 at Ebor), the most significant being the rattly fist crack ‘Fidget’ 17 on the 4th Breakaway. It was, however, a period of consolidation after the grade pushing and exploration of the previous few years and it allowed everyone the chance to get out and repeat routes.

There was also a new younger crowd of climbers such as John Lattanzio, Greg Pritchard, Ed Sharpe and later in the year Mark Colyvan, who were keen to push their grades and there was no better place than at Ebor under Birchall’s guiding hand.

1980 saw even more new-comers to Armidale in Paul Bayne and Austin Legler (from the USA). Al Stephens, who had done very little in the past few years jumped into the limelight again with Rob Clark who arrived in Armidale the previous year. The other important development in 1980 was the arrival of ‘Friends’ to New England which had immediate applications at Ebor, and later in the year the use of chalk became common.

The first route to be done in 1980 was Paul Bayne’s lead of an old problem which had been previously attempted by Dick Curtis to give ‘Anyone for Tennis’ 20MO. A couple of months later, also on the Fourth Breakaway, Mark Colyvan led the slippery off width ‘Resurrection Shuffle’ 18M0 and a little later still, visitor Tony Dignan led the classic test piece ‘Brown Buffalo’ 20. However it was the Second Breakaway which received the most attention and yielded many new routes in the latter part of the year.

Clark and Stephens did the classic line ‘Amphetamine Annie’ 18. Austin Legler did ‘Anthrax’ 19M0 (& later freed it at 20) and Lattanzio and Colyvan did many new middle and easy grade routes, the best of which was ‘Hitman’ 15. All in all there were 22 new routes for the year bringing the total to 95 at Ebor at the end of 1980. Lattanzio and Legler left Armidale at the end of the year and Pritchard left early in the next.

At the beginning of 1981 the hardest climb in New England was ‘Demon Dropout’ 21 (later upgraded to 22) put up in 1978 and while Ebor’s hardest was ‘Luce’ 20/21 (later upgraded to 21) freed in 1976. So there had been no advancement in grades at Ebor for 4 years and for 2 years in the rest of New England; that was to change in 198Early in the year Greg Pritchard, Ed Sharp and Al Stephens developed Dead Heroes Buttress and did quite a few routes here, the best of which was ‘Daroof’ 17 led by Stephens. In March Colyvan freed his own route ‘Resurrection Shuffle’ at 18 and later in the same day, along with Ed Sharpe, freed ‘Anyone for Tennis’ 20 under controversial circumstances by preplacing 2 pitons that weren’t present on the first ascent, to protect the scary top section. After much criticism Colyvan removed the pegs and led it free again without them. About midway through the year the new guide book by John Lattanzio and Greg Pritchard came out entitled ‘Climbers Guide to the N.E. Tablelands’ It contained 116 routes recorded at Ebor, although 3 were mistakes (and one omission) so there were 114 routes at this point up to grade 20/2Later that year after the new routing frenzy at Dome Wall had died down, interest reverted to Ebor and Colyvan led (and then freed) the classic offhand crack ‘Lethal Dose’ 21 while also on the 6th breakaway Birchall and Clark took turns on ‘Toxic Shock’ 20 which was one of Clark’s last routes before he left Armidale for Hobart. Right at the end of the year Colyvan led Birchall and Killip up ‘Chemical Warfare’ 22 to bring the years total number of new routes up to 25 along with 4 aid eliminations..

Interest continued at Ebor in the early part of 1982, particularly on the first breakaway where Stephens led ‘Bombay Duck’ 20MO (freed a couple of weeks later, at 21, by Lattanzio, who had returned to Armidale to live), and Colyvan led ‘Pretty Vacant’ 20, ‘Blitzkrieg Bop’ 19 and the desperate flared crack ‘Power Play’ 23MO (freed by Colyvan shortly afterwards at 23). The 4th Breakaway yielded ‘Domination Quickstep’ 19 by Lattanzio and ‘Transactional Burnout’ 20 by Birchall. Colyvan left Armidale for Sydney early in 1982. However he returned later in the year to do ‘Arsenic and Old Lace’ 24 on the 6th Breakaway, which was New England’s first 24. Interest in Ebor waned as the year went on and a total of only 9 routes and 3 aid eliminations were recorded during 1982.

1983 marked the beginning of New England climbers interest in bolt protected walls and slabs and consequently they have been pretty lean years at Ebor since then. During 1983 Colyvan returned to do ‘Blue Murder’ 21 on the Second Breakaway while Stephens led ‘Solid Gold’ 20MO, the first route on Solid Gold Buttress (freed later that same day by Colyvan at 20).

Later in the year Solid Gold Buttress was the scene of a rather unfortunate accident and rescue involving Brian Birchall, a 30 ft ground fall, a variety of popped runners and an unfinished new route. 1983 also saw Mark Colyvan lead the classic ‘It’s My Party’ 22 on the Third Breakaway on yet another of his semi-_regular visits, and Paul Bayne leave Armidale. During 1983 there were 8 new routes along with one aid elimination to bring Ebor’s total number of routes at the end of 1983 up to 137. 1984 sees the return of Richard Curtis to live in Armidale and he frees his old route ‘Prime Cut’ at 20 (which no-one knew had any aid in it, it just so happens that the couple of ascents it had also found it necessary to rest on the rope!) and added ‘Little Wonder’ 18 to the First Breakaway. He also took visitor Kevin Lindorff here so he could do the arête ‘Chocolate Barbarian’ 23, which was the first bolt protected face climb here, although poorly bolted, since the bolt spoils another naturally protected route.

1984 yielded a total of 4 new routes and one aid elimination; In 1985 Stephens does the classic bolt protected face route ‘Sucking Faces’ 20 on the first breakaway.

Curtis and Animal (Paul Colyvan) visited the other side of the gorge and did ‘Snatch and Grab’ 18 (led Curtis) and ‘Grab the Snatch’ 21 (led Animal) on Bondage Buttress. They were the only 3 new routes done in 1985.

1986 saw a couple of aid eliminations of interest with Lattanzio freeing ‘Supermouse’ at 22 and Stephens freeing all but the start of ‘Sundown’ now 20M.

Larry Dixon from Dorrigo began developing Pub Buttress on the other side of the gorge with ‘Damp Monkeys’ 18 being the first route, and probably the best to date. A total of 5 new routes and 2 aid eliminations for the year.

The only activity in 1987 has been Larry Dixon and Al Stephens continuing development of Pub Buttress and bolting some of the arêtes on the second breakaway such as ‘Modern Electrics’ 17 (by Dixon) and ‘Ilean’ 20 (by Stephens), making use of their new power drill. A total of 13 new routes were done in 1987 to bring the total number of routes recorded at Ebor at the end of 1987 to 162 with grade 3 being the easiest and grade 24 being the hardest.

I am tempted to say that the future at Ebor looks fairly bleak however stranger things have happened than crack climbing returning to favour and if recent developments with power drills and aretes continue, Ebor may yet be dragged into the modern era of face climbing. We’ll just have to wait and see.

Mark Colyvan 1 Jan 1988 1988, the Bi-Centennial year, produced four more crack-lines, the best being ‘Tough Customer’ 21 by Jack Lattanzio and Mark Colyvan. Two bolt-protected routes were also established; Tadpole’s ‘It Pays To Belong’ 20 ,and the very beautiful ‘Dream Of The Devil’ by Mark Colyvan. This climb being the first to have fixed hangers at Ebor.

In December 1989 the summer heat melted something in Al Stephens’ brain causing him, with Mark Colyvan, to bolt up ‘Dead Calm’ 22 at the 1st Breakaway . The Nymboida was very low that summer so Larry Dixon and a group of Rafting Guides visited Ebor and did ‘Old Punks and Young Hippies’ 16 on the 2nd breakaway.

1990 saw only two climbs established, both on the 2nd breakaway and both using bolts; ‘Rage’ 21 by Stephens, Gavin Dean and Anita Gordon, and ‘Steel Magnolias’ 24 , equal to the hardest grade at Ebor so far, by Mark Colyvan, Dean and Stephens.

There were no new routes at Ebor during 1991, 1992, and 1993. Many repeats were done during this time at both the First and Second Breakaways, with occasional visits to the Fourth.

Three routes were completed in 1994. At the First Breakaway Brian Cork led Scott Cleland up ‘Biscuit’ 12, and Cleland led Stephens up ‘Nought’ 18.

At the Second Breakaway Gordon Low led Al Stephens, Brian Cork and Toby Waters up ‘Sex and Intrigue’ 20.

1995 saw a new climbing style developing at Ebor, “Shimmying up a fridge”. Gordon Low used this style at the 2nd Breakaway to complete ‘New Blue Dress’ 24, equal to Ebor’s hardest.

In 1996 Gordon Low with Ben Christian, again perfected this technique by leading Ebor’s hardest climb to date, ‘The Proverbial’ 26, at the Third Breakaway.

What’s next? There are many more arêtes to be “shimmied” but they will all be very hard. If you can perfect the technique it will be worth the effort.

Al Stephens 27 Aug 1996

In 98 James Langston with Al Stephens added Funky Monkey.

Either not much happened after this or a lot of history has been lost.

In 2006 the NPWS wanted to ban climbing here but in consultation with the UNEMC future climbing here is secure. In 2007 Liam Jackson and Todd Free added some bolts around the lookout as part of this agreement.

1.4.2. Gara Gorge 609 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad, Boulder and other styles

Long/Lat: 151.821961, -30.625204

Description:

All the cliffs on the Gara gorge 15 minutes from Armidale.

1.4.3. Stonehenge 71 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 151.742422, -29.840773

Description:

Stonehenge is a great bouldering spot with 60+ routes on some great shaped rocks. The rock is typical New England granite with lots of crimps, flakes and great friction. And where else can you park right next to the problem you're working?

Even though stonehenge has seen active bouldering for some time a lot of history isn't recorded so any feedback on history, routes, names and grades would be greatly appreciated!

Stonehenge is about an hours drive north of Armidale and about 5 minutes south of Glen Innes. It is 700 hundred meters north of 'Balancing Rock' which is sign posted.

The area is a recreation area complete with picnic area, barbecues, footy pitch, washrooms, water and a rifle range.

1.4.4. Dangars Gorge 23 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 151.726576, -30.675762

1.4.5. Mt Yarrowyck 177 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Boulder

Long/Lat: 151.372529, -30.464257

Unique Features And Strengths:

Mt Yarrowyck is granite bouldering and climbing. There is a lot of climbing that has been done and still more to be discovered. The boulders range from 2m to 15m high and the roped climbing is up to 2 pitches long.

Description:

The Mt Yarrowyck Nature Reserve west of Armidale is best known for it’s Aboriginal rock art and it’s isolation. However this area also offers some superb bouldering on exceptionally high quality granite. The boulder fields are extensive and the environment and landings usually friendly. The rock is featured with unusual crystalline pockets, heinous slopers and the arch-typical granite crimper. These combine to offer problems ranging from V0 slabs to steep pocketed test-pieces. The best time to climb is from March through to November. Winter days can be cold with single digit temperatures not unusual whilst pleasant summer mornings can give way to scorching midday sun. The area is serviced by the NPWS who maintain a toilet and some BBQs but drinking water is not available so be warned, particularly if you intend to visit in the summer months.

Jeff Gracie.

Access Issues:

95% of the climbing at Yarrowyck is located on private property, but the land owner is a climber and has granted access to all climbers anytime. Please do not leave garbage around, leave gates as you find them and do not harass stock. Climbing at Yarrowyck is a privilege, not a right.

The other 5% is located on National Park land along the trail to the Aboriginal Rock Art site.

Approach:

Yarrowyck is about 30 minutes west of Armidale.

From Armidale take the Bundarra Rd past Mitre Ten and the Sale yards for about 30 minutes.

When you get to the T-intersection at Thunderbolts Way, turn right and after about 1km turn right into the car park of the Mt Yarrowyck Reserve.

History:

It wasn’t until 1975 that the potential of the boulder fields at Yarrowyck was realized. Although the crags higher up the hill had long been a focus of local attention, the numerous problems on the low lying boulders had gone largely unnoticed. Development following the initial reconnaissance's yielded a number of area classics including Killop's Killer , Burchill's Bomber, Latanzio's Lurch and Bayne's Claim To Fame. The main protagonists at this time being Bob Killop, John Latanzio, Brian Burchill, and Paul Bayne. Unlike other bouldering areas at that time the problems at Yarrowyck focused mostly on boldness rather than technical difficulty.

By the mid 80s the focus of the Armidale climbing scene had again returned to roped climbing with the popularity of the ‘practice boulders’ all but a fond memory. However the bouldering at Mt Yarrowyck returned briefly to the limelight in the early 90’s following the arrival of the now infamous Carl Schultz. Although Carl's bouldering passion was seen by some as an oddball activity, he pioneered a number of extremely difficult problems in the Armidale area, many of which are yet to see repeats. It was in 1997 that the Yarrowyck area underwent a full bouldering renaissance after being rediscovered by Armidale locals Ben Christian, Gordon Low, and Jeff Gracie. The new problems all focused on technical difficulty and included the development of the Sharpest Mono Area with it’s classic problems, 'Pocket Fest' (V2), and 'The Sharpest Mono in the World' (V3). Development went into overdrive in early 1999 when the mist finally cleared from Christians’ ‘bouldering goggles’ allowing him to at last realize the true potential of the area (something that Gracie had been telling him for years). The first focus of attention was 'The Trackside Boulder' where 'New Beginning' (V4) and 'Jingoism' (V7) both saw quick ascents.

1.4.6. Moonbi 28 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad and Unknown

Long/Lat: 151.076836, -30.995035

Description:

The Moonbi area (Anteater Buttress and environs) presents many granitic cliff lines, mainly slabby in nature and much of which has now been explored. In the early years most of the interest concentrated on Anteater Buttress and the boulders above due to easy access and obvious quality. The slab routes are some of the best in New England and there have been no hang-ups with anti-bolting ethics here so most of the routes are well protected.

Access Issues:

The town of Moonbi is located about 20km North of Tamworth on the New England Highway, in the heart of chicken country. The access arrangements have changed in recent years and general access is now not allowed. If you want to climb here you must go with Kevin Moore from Tamworth or with the UNEMC from Armidale. In addition you will be required to fill out a special indemnity form, requested by the landowner's insurers available only from Moore and Stephens. Failure to adhere to this procedure will see a total lockout.

History:

The first routes were done in April 1975 by various Armidale climbers. The notable routes from these early visits were the classic 'Snakeskin Flake' 13 by Bob Killip and Phil Prior, the desperate jam crack 'Savage' 19 (now 23 due to a falling block) by Bob Killip and Max Smart, and the bold 'Slabba-Dabba-Do' 17,which was the first slab route to be done,by Robert Stazewski and Bob Killip. The last route was particularly impressive since it was done on sight (ie no brushing or bolting !) and it took many years before it had its second lead. Another route of interest was the popular 'Sorrow' 14 by Phil Prior. A total of eight new routes were put up that year.

Only two new climbs were completed in 1976, 'Laurel And Hardy' 15, above the slabs, by Brian Birchall and, on the Splitters Gully Road Slabs the multi-pitch 'Babylon' 12 by Laimonis Kavelieris, the only climb there to date.

The area continued to see visitors from time to time mainly to repeat 'Snakeskin Flake'. Early 1982 saw the first climbs at Goal Creek Slabs. Ed Sharpe led 'Trundle' 11 and Al Stephens did 'Protection Racket' 14 and 'Up For Grabs' 18. During the same year Kevin Moore completed the first route up high on the ridge at The Brothers, 'Can't Remember Her Name' 12.

However it wasn't until Mark Colyvan and Brian Birchall returned to the area to do the second ascent of 'Slabba-Dabba-Do' in early 1983 that the potential of the slabs was realised. Colyvan bolted and brushed an obvious black slab which he climbed a few months later with Paul Bayne and Paul Colyvan (Animal) to give 'New Romantic' 21 which was an instant classic. This route was Paul's introduction to slab climbing, a style which he grew to love and master very quickly. During the same year Ed Sharpe returned to Goal Creek Slabs to do the powerful 'Scare Tactics' 19. Later in the year, back at the Anteater slabs Al Stephens got into the act by doing 'On the Slack' 18, another route sporting bolts,and Paul Colyvan did 'Slap And Tickle' 17. Paul also did 'Green Spastic Chook' 11, on the boulders above the slabs.

When Paul Colyvan moved to Tamworth the next year, 1884, he did the bold slab left of 'New Romantic' called 'Fashion Conscious' 22 which was the first slab done in the new high friction boots; Fires.

Things were fairly quiet here until August,1986 when the Colyvan brothers returned for a long weekend and camped in a Kootingal motel so that they could eat Chocolate Bavarians and watch the footy at night. They spent most of the three days at the crag brushing and bolting. However they ended up with three great slab routes; 'Slow Fade' 22 by Mark,'Cock and Pullet' 17 by Paul, and 'Head Over Heels' 19 also by Paul!. Later in the year Al Stephens put in two half days bolting to produce yet another good slab in 'Buck Buck Bacaw' 21.

1987 produced only two new routes, 'Bantam' 17 by Larry Dixon, and 'Finger Lickin Chicken' by Stephens, both on the boulders above the slabs.

1988 was another quiet year with two shady climbs on the boulders above the slabs, 'Shady Bridge' by Gary Phillips and 'Shady Tactics' by Kevin Moore. Later that year Kevin Moore with Bob Murison began exploration of the Kootingal Tip. They found 'Scanties on the Chockstone' 14, by Bob, and Petticoat Corner' 14 by Kevin.

The next two years were boom years for Moonbi. During 1989 21 new climbs were recorded. Seven were completed at the Lookout Crag (now totally closed), the best being the classics 'Confidence Limits' 16 and 'Interative Process' 17 both by Kevin Moore. Eight new routes were conceived on the boulders below the slabs. The best being Larry Dixon's 'Faith No More' 21 and the classic 'Beak Job' 19, and Mark Colyvan's 'The Fosbury Flop' 21. A quick weekend visit by the infamous crag developer Andrew Penny with Carl-Joan Jagusch resulted in two new routes, the best being the very popular 'Henny Penny' 18 by Penny. Later that year Mark Colyvan with Jo Monaghan slogged their way up to the slabs on the Left side of Moonbi Gap and completed the very long, but easy access route 'Walking Back To Happiness' 4, as well as 'Promise' 16, a two pitch slab.

New route fever continued into 1990. Twenty-two new routes! John Wilde put up the last route on the slabs to date,the very bold 'Head Over Heels-Direct Finish' 24. Attention then moved to the Lookout crag. Eight new routes were completed, mostly by Newcastle climbers. The best being 'Sebastian's' Maximum Likelihood' 25 by Paul Reviere, 'Zoro Direct' 21 by George Fieg, 'Call Me Al' 24 by John Wilde and 'The Great Leap Forward' 19 by Al Stephens. During one of his visits, Newcastle climber John Wilde accidentally stole Paul Colyvan's bolt prepared route at The Fosbury Flop Boulder, 'Death Warrant' 23. Around the same time Kevin Moore completed 'Pluckin' Feathers' 21 on the boulders above the slabs. The other area of huge development was the boulders below the slabs. Seven new climbs were put up, the best being 'The Caponiser' 17 by Kevin Moore, 'Cock-A-Hoop' 22 and 'Kentucky Fried Rodent' 21 by Gavin Dean, all at Pecker Wall. Later that year interest turned to the two new areas up on the ridge. Kevin Moore led a tramline of climbers up the classic 'Boys Day Out' 15 at The Brothers, then moved on to The Minefield to do 'Hybrid Vigour' 20. With him was John Wilde who, at the same crag, completed the very technical 'Dambuster' 24.

In 1991 everyone calmed down. Kevin's son Anthony Moore led 'Play School' 7, his first lead. Al Stephens made the long trek to Moonbi Gap-Left Side to complete 'Perfect Skin' 15. Then during December when it was too hot to do any long lines, Kevin Moore ticked of three more at Kootingal Tip, 'No Refuse'15, Wasted Time' 9 and 'Laughing Litter' 10.

In 1992 Al Stephens finally cracked his long term project at Pecker Wall, 'Chicken Vindaloo' 25. Kevin Moore, Dave Worthington and Jim Morgan found another five climbs at Kootingal Tip, the best being Kevin's 'Scalpel' 19 and Jim's 'Dynamic Lifter' 21.

The Kootingal Tip produced one more climb in April 1993,'XPT' 20 by Kevin Moore. In October the same year Stuart Whitten launched a small expedition to Moonbi Gap-Right Side (the North side) and completed 'Up The Garden Path' 5, 'Sly Street' 12 and 'Shoulder Boulder' 16.

If you want to do new climbs, there's always lines between the lines. But if you don't, there are masses of great climbs to repeat. Anyone want to go to Moonbi next weekend ? Al Stephens........September 199

1.4.7. Bakers Creek 20 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 151.891919, -30.542745

Unique Features And Strengths:

Fine grained granite, large boulders

Description:

Deep gorge not far from Armidale, off Waterfall way. I heard from Rick Curtis that a few trad lines had been done there but no record of them exists. Perhaps 20 boulder problems established so far, with scope for more, and potential for bolted and naturally protected climbs as well. Access is steep and difficult, straight off the lookout.

Access Issues:

From Armidale head east on the waterfall way for 20kms, then right at the sign post, onto dirt for a couple kms.

Approach:

From the lookout, jump the fence on the right and follow a faint track down to the right. Caution must be taken walking in as the decent is very steep. As you approach there is a promising looking boulder that you soon realize is the size of a house. Most established boulder problems are downstream of this (problem 'High times and down beats' is upstream of the giant block and 'One too many' sits against it), but future problems exist right through the gorge from the waterfall downstream.

1.4.8. Bluff Rock 1 route in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 151.998922, -29.167188

1.4.9. Cathedral Rocks 57 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Boulder

Long/Lat: 152.231903, -30.439685

Approach:

From Armidale take the Grafton/Dorrigo Road for approx. 79km to the turn-off to the park. Follow the dirt road for 7km. to the Barokee Rest Area. Park here then follow the walking track for approx. 2km. to the walls of Cathedral Rock. All climbs, except 'Morlock', are on the sunny 'North side'.

The best time to climb here is autumn, late spring or on a still, sunny winter’s day. Take out all your rubbish and no fires please.

History:

Due to the popularity of other crags in the Armidale/New England area, Cathedral Rock hasn’t produced many new routes since its discovery as a climbing area in 1979. The history of this crag spans only two years. In the first of those two years, 1979, access to the cliff was more reminiscent of a minor bush-walk. For the second part of this history, 1984, access was greatly improved with a picnic/camping area and a pleasant track leading to the crag.

In 1979 Ed Sharp convinced Al Stephens that there was a huge amount of rock to climb at Cathedral Rock. In those days there was a locked gate at the aqueduct. Bushwalkers parked here and walked several kilometres down the road, then cross-country to the rock. Ed and Al, being very cunning, phoned the D.C.A.(who administer the Radar on Round Mountain) and convinced them to leave the gate open for them. They drove to the bottom of the hill (the site of the current gate) then walked across to the rock. After some exploring they found and completed 'Morlock' (14), a climb that goes from one side of the rock to the other. They realised the great potential of the place but didn’t return until several years later.

1984 was quite a huge year for Cathedral Rock. Stephens convinced Larry Dixon of the possibility of new routes waiting in the warm winter sun. Stephens led 'Soft Touch' (17), in May and they returned in June for Dixon to lead 'Day Dream' (12), while Stephens did the big chimney 'We Won’t Get Fooled Again' (16). Stephens returned the same month with Richard Curtis to put up two climbs on the isolated pillar to the left of the walk-in track. Curtis glided up 'Tontons Macoutes' (22) while from the same start Stephens went up, did a backward somersault off, then up again, 'Street Café' (21). In August Stephens led Brian Birchall up the chimney 'Instrument Of Revenge' (17). Paul (Animal) Colyvan got wind of the possibility of new routes and in December, with Birchall and Simon Gay put up the very scary and dangerous 'Cheap Regrets' (22). The same month Colyvan returned with Stephens and Dixon to do 'Bangin’ Beava' (24).

Well that’s it for now. There are still some cracks left but the best routes will be the walls and faces littered with chicken heads. Protection will require the use of modern technology. It’s all there waiting for you!

1.4.10. Wollomombi Falls 2 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad and Sport

Long/Lat: 152.040002, -30.533920

Approach:

Access: The falls are about 40km. east of Armidale off the Grafton/Dorrigo Road. They are well signposted. Park at the car park/picnic area. Getting into the gorge is not easy. The recommended route into the gorge requires no abseils but it is loose and Dangerous. From the car park walk 100m towards the falls where there is a long grassy platform slightly below the rim of the gorge. At the far-left end of the platform is a gully and rib. Stick to the very loose rib. Stay on the rib, making a few detours around minor obstacles, until you pass a huge landslip on your left and finally reach a small saddle. The spur bluffs out beyond the next high point beyond the saddle. From the saddle, move down right, until you arrive at a steep, slippery watercourse. A scrubby steep spur to the right of the watercourse avoids the steep section in the gully. Once below this section continue on down the watercourse until you arrive at another steep section close to the gorge floor. From here move left into bushes and scree, down to the gorge floor. If you get lost you will have to abseil. Walk up the left-hand river past the junction to the base of the falls. If you are doing the Ridge, go straight up between the two rivers from the junction

1.4.11. Beulah 631 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Boulder

Long/Lat: 150.927251, -30.485121

Unique Features And Strengths:

Rolling terrain covered in (almost) unclimbed granite boulders and domes.

Location of the Annual Beulah Rock Festivus held every Easter and/or ANZAC Day. www.BeulahRockFestivus.com

Description:

Located 1.5 hrs west of Armidale, NSW, Beulah is the Axelsen Family Station. The station is 3000 acres in size and has rolling hills covered in granite boulders as well as 3 large domes up to 70m in height.

Access Issues:

Access to Beulah is only permitted during the Annual Beulah Rock Festivus that is held there every Easter. More info here: www.beulahrockfestivus.com

Approach:

From Armidale, head west on the Bundarra Road. When you come to a T-junction with Thunderbolts Way, turn right. Follow this until the next left after about 5 km, which is Torreyburn Road, which will take you to Kingstown.

From Kingstown head west on the Bendemeer Road for about 3 km then turn right onto Warrabah Road.

Set your trip odometer to zero.

Follow Warrabah Road for 22.6 km going through many dips and over several cattle grids. If you get to 23 km, you have gone too far. You will pass through Warrabah Station and drive by Warrabah Homestead, white metal signs will tell you this. Just before you get to Beulah you will see a sign on the left at a white cattle grid saying welcome to Linton Station. Two hundred metres passed this is Beulah.

You're looking for a green mailbox on the left that says Beulah and has a large piece of steel nailed to a tree with BRF spray painted on it. You made it.

Address is 2317 Warabah Road, Beulah Station.

GPS for Gate: -30.462131 150.919796

Where To Stay:

During the Festivus camping is available and some accommodation is available in two vacant and unfurnished houses.

Ethic:

First ascents are hugely appreciated and the object of climbing at Beulah. Scrubbing lichen and removing loose rock is encouraged but the line is drawn at chipping holds or glueing holds back on. If a hold comes off, please leave it off and climb what the rock affords you.

Bolting is also permitted with permission and as long as there is no available natural protection. For example this includes a 30m climb that requires 9 bolts and one cam or wire to protect. The adding of a 10th bolt for the convenience of not having to carry said wire or nut is not acceptable.

History:

The first boulder problems and routes were scrubbed in 2005. The following year more potential problems were scrubbed, GPS'd and left for another time. The idea for the Festivus began in early 2007 and the first Festivus saw 7 people out in August sending some scrubbed lines. The second annual saw attendance double and the date change to Easter. The third annual event became the a full blown Beulah Rock Festivus complete with sponsorship, prizes, events and climbers from all over Australia. 2010 had 60 people from all over coming out for 4 days of perfect weather and a 132 new problems sent!

In 2011 the 5th Annual had over 120 climbers come out for five days of sun and good times!

1.4.12. Gibraltar Rock 5 routes in Crag

Summary:
Boulder and Trad

Long/Lat: 152.381243, -29.610421

1.4.13. Uncarved Block R&D wall 18 routes in Gym

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 151.687906, -30.538618

Unique Features And Strengths:

NOT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

This is a research facility for the sole purpose of testing and improving climbing holds. Owned and operated by Uncarved Block Pty Ltd. www.uncarvedblock.com.au

Description:

50 m2 of climbing surface.

1.5. Sydney Metropolitan 4,512 routes in Region

Summary:
Boulder, Sport and other styles

Long/Lat: 150.986010, -33.799653

1.5.1. Hornsby and the North 552 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport, Boulder and other styles

Long/Lat: 151.189691, -33.617418

1.5.2. Sutherland 691 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport, Boulder and other styles

Long/Lat: 151.039454, -34.043832

Description:

Most of the climbing can be found on the rim of the hills, overlooking the Woronora River and Georges Rivers. The rock is the usual Sydney sandstone but the Cathedral has a a weird type of stone that is a refreshing change from the norm.

1.5.3. North West 684 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Boulder

Long/Lat: 150.895442, -33.701206

1.5.4. Northern Beaches 469 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad, Sport and other styles

Long/Lat: 151.287204, -33.703897

1.5.5. North Shore 1,133 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Boulder

Long/Lat: 151.187634, -33.773890

Description:

The North Shore has something on offer for all lovers of chalk and rock. There's the Old classic spots like the amazing highballs at Lindfield Rocks, Pumpy much loved problems of Sissy Crag and some brilliant trad at Brown's Road.

New to the Area is the Linfield-like When Crags Collide, the diverse, unappreciated Blues Point and some Slab-tastic climbing at Harbour Side Slabs.

With all that in mind no one can go past the famous Sydney Harbour climb "Clocks" at Balls Head. The North Shore has it all covered, chalk up and climb on!

1.5.6. Sydney CBD 1 route in Region

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 151.208830, -33.871885

1.5.7. Eastern Suburbs 290 routes in Region

Summary:
Boulder, Sport and other styles

Long/Lat: 151.235022, -33.921403

Description:

An amazing example of sea side crags opening up for people interested in all things rock. Top roping, lead climbing, trad, high lining and abseiling, the Eastern Suburbs has it all. During summer you and your friends will more than likely have mother nature put a show on for you with her wildlife. There's always a good chance of seeing whales, dolphins and other creatures. Clovelly is a prime location for this as well as Diamond Bay and Bondi. If you're interested in a little adrenalin rush then perhaps Rosa Gully is the place for you with several high line anchors in situ for those who dare!

Most crags have easy parking with only a short distance to walk, scramble or abseil into the crag.

1.5.8. Inner West 248 routes in Region

Summary:
Boulder, Sport and other styles

Long/Lat: 151.122433, -33.897807

Description:

Located close to Sydney CBD, offering an assortment of lead climbing, top roping and a plethora of bouldering.

Sydney's Inner West has a surprising amount of climbing for being so close to the city. Earlwood gets by far the most attention (and so it should) but new crags with good potential are being discovered every month.

This location offers everything from well protected and varied short routes in nice bush surroundings, to pumpy low caves and solid highballs with nasty landings by the water.

Being so close to Sydney, these areas are well worth a look in especially with Iron Cove offering several decent crags to boulder at.

Respect to the enviroment and keeping crags clean will maintain a healthy and important relationship between the climbing community, local councils and National Parks. Carry out what you take in and enjoy what the Inner West has to offer.

If you come across an area that is being developed or you think could be under development, please show all due respect to the developers and do not climb the projects listed on thecrag.com

1.5.9. Western Suburbs 40 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport, Boulder and Unknown

Long/Lat: 150.952210, -33.877172

1.5.10. Colo River 83 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport, Unknown and other styles

Long/Lat: 150.775044, -33.420830

Description:

A good collection of mixed crags with some nice sport areas and slab climbing. Provides a nice winter location close to Sydney.

Old school sport and Trad areas with a mix of carrots and fixed hangers. If developing make use of Trad placements where possible and if replacing bolts please respect the route as it is and replace bolt for bolt.

1.5.11. South West 252 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport, Unknown and other styles

Long/Lat: 150.732337, -33.935828

Description:

The neglected area of Sydney cragging, strange considering the quality of rock and recent finds like St helens Park bouldering, the big Junkyard Cave and the Hide Away.

In the 70 and 80 and bunch of routes were done at the Woolwash at the back of Airds near Campbelltown, short cracks and mossy slabs mostly done on top rop. A rough guide was done but it lacked details and descriptions.

In roughly 2011 and 2012 Byron Glover set to work on the quality rock and cave of the Wedderburn and St Helens Park bouldering areas finding some absolute gems in the process. Steep and pocketed on quality stone, V3 - V11, easy access, who wants more?

In 2012 Matt Brooks went looking for bouldering in the area after moving nearby and getting a copy of the then new Sydney climbing guide - south of the harbour.

He found the new sector to the Woolwash, the Junkyard Cave with its water polished sandstone and classy steep routes, some that would be quite at home in the Grampians (not in Suburban Sydney).

In early 2014 he also discovered the Hide Away another quality sandstone offering on the banks of the Georges River with a variety of sport routes from 12 - 28 and the 20m roof of the Ghetto Superstar.

With the amount of rock along the length of the Georges River there are sure to be more discoveries.

1.5.12. Royal National Park 68 routes in Region

Summary:
Boulder, Sport and other styles

Long/Lat: 151.064051, -34.125961

1.6. Illawarra 2,821 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 150.610345, -34.772557

Description:

Sandstone ranging from rock hard at Mt Alex to slightly sandy else where.

1.6.1. Appin 20 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 150.840739, -34.212799

1.6.2. Wollongong 344 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad, Sport and other styles

Long/Lat: 150.925310, -34.302473

Description:

Australias 9th largest city. With excellent beaches, mountain bike trails and a relaxed pace (as compared to Sydney)

1.6.3. Kiama 7 routes in Region

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 150.859088, -34.663500

Description:

Volcanic sea cliffs surrounding the 'famous' tourist town of Kiama, south of Wollongong.

1.6.4. Nowra 1,772 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport

Long/Lat: 150.485715, -34.973729

Unique Features And Strengths:

The best sport climbing in the state. Sometimes ugly, but great climbing, with a huge variety of styles. Also home to some of the state's hardest bouldering.

Description:

Nowra is a fantastic sport climbing area, in quite a beautiful urban setting, with many of the crags sitting in valleys carved out by the Shoalhaven River. It is not unusual to park your car outside someone's house, then disappear into the bush, and 3 minutes later be at the crag. The climbing is characterized by being steep and powerful, there are not many pure endurance routes. While the climbing is not as visually inspiring as other areas in Australia, once you're on it's very good.

Nowra is a very comfortable place to climb, most of crags require a five minute approach at the most. All the routes are bolted with easy lower offs and the rock is generally very good. While Nowra doesn’t offer the casual café style that the Blue Mountains has, it is a good location for rest days, with reasonable surf only a short drive away. Nowra itself has all the amenities you would expect from a reasonably sized city.

For the beginner climber Nowra doesn't have a lot to offer, all the easier type climbs do tend to be the chossier ones, and there is very little below grade 18. For the intermediate to advanced climber however there is a lot of very good routes to do, especially if you climb 20+. The best crag in the area is Thompson's Point, it offers more climbing in a greater range of grades than any other Nowra crag. This is probably the best crag to visit if you are an intermediate climber. In the 18 to 24 range there is a plethora of really good routes, all well protected and ideal for pushing your grades on.

For the advanced climber there is loads of stuff to do. There are a lot of other crags apart from Thompson's, they are not quite so large and varied. The intermediate climber has to wander about a bit, but there are some real gems to be found. For the harder climber Nowra is a paradise of projects to do.

Apart from climbing there is also a lot of bouldering, a lot of hard stuff has been done at areas like Lot 33 and Cheesedale, with much more being developed.

All up Nowra is a great place to climb, what it lacks in presence, it makes up for in fun.

Approach:

Three hours south of Sydney. It’s easy to get public transport to Nowra, once you are there many of the crags are in walking distance of each other. If you're staying at one of the parks opposite Thompson's Point it may be to hire a canoe to get across, which saves a long walk.

Where To Stay:

It is possible to bush camp for free, but you want to have found a very secluded spot- climbers' cars have been broken into. The best option is to pay for camping at one of the parks opposite Thompson's Point.

1.6.5. Point Perpendicular 633 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad, Unknown and other styles

Long/Lat: 150.805996, -35.040913

Unique Features And Strengths:

Point Perpendicular is a beautiful seaside climbing area with a fantastic atmosphere and often incredible exposure.

Access Issues:

Point Perp is located within a Navy Weapons Range. It is generally open during weekends and NSW school holidays though it is best to ring the rangers (02 4448 3411) to check first.

Where To Stay:

There is car camping at Honeymoon Bay with toilets but no water. This is inside the navy weapons range and signposted on the drive-in track. It's only open Friday and Saturday nights, plus Sunday nights during NSW long weekends and all week during NSW school holidays. During school holidays it can be full with family holidaymakers.

Ethic:

Point Perp is predominantly a trad crag. There has been more bolting recently but this is a particularly contentious topic. A lot of the bolts are the traditional Aussie carrot and it would be a good idea to have at least half a dozen keyhole hangers before going to the Point for the first time.

1.6.6. Jervis Bay 44 routes in Region

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 150.707974, -35.142481

Description:

Southern head of Jervis Bay. Sea side bouldering. Some of the crags are in Booderee National Park.

1.6.7. Cataract Gorge 1 route in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

1.6.8. Illawarra Escarpment 0 routes in Region

Description:

Clifflines between Royal National Park (north) and Wollongong (south)

1.6.9. The Castle 0 routes in Crag

Description:

Boulder fields on the middle plateau of The Castle.

Access Issues:

Morton National Park

1.7. South Coast 76 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 149.934651, -36.360813

Description:© (nmonteith)

Sandstone sea-cliff climbing a long way from anywhere.

1.7.1. Tuross gorge 3 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 149.655752, -36.456090

1.7.2. Ben Boyd National Park 73 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 150.018558, -37.233754

1.8. Central Tablelands 5,642 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 149.895747, -33.069365

1.8.1. Blue Mountains 4,971 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 150.337263, -33.703968

Unique Features And Strengths:

Massive amounts of rock, easily accessible high quality routes in a beautiful location.

Description:

Driving up into the Blue Mountains is like entering a fortress, for once you are up in them, you are on a plateau surrounded on all sides by cliffs. It is in this almost suburban bush surrounding, that some of Australia's best climbing resides. From big adventurous walls, to smaller single pitch sport climbs, to fantastic trad climbing, the Blueys has a bit of it all. All this comes amidst the smoky blue green vistas of the Blueys, which on a good day are so peaceful you will never want to leave.

The Blue Mountains are a unique destination offering a very civilised climbing experience, courtesy of places like Katoomba and Blackheath, that sport a healthy cafe culture. The mornings can begin with a coffee in Blackheath and a visit to the bakery. The day can then be spent thrashing yourself on some of the countless sport routes, or scaring yourself silly on some sandy trad horror show. The evening can then culminate in Katoomba with a nice café meal and possibly a film. For a more traditional experience head to Mt Victoria for the pub, and the rickety old theatre. Most of the crags are within easy driving distance of each other, and in some cases easy walking distance. The most popular area is around Blackheath which offers the highest concentration of quality climbing to be found. There are many other areas though which are very good, most of which are within half an hour, to an hours drive away. For most people these days, the Blueys is really a sport climbing destination. Apart from Nowra, there is no other place where you will find so many sport routes. There is still plenty of trad climbing though, even though the sandstone is not as suited to trad climbing as the Grampians and Arapiles, being generally poorer in quality. Mt Piddington and Mt York are probably two of the best places to trad climb, although both crags offer some sport climbing. Around Blackheath the best sport area is Centennial Glen, although Upper Shipley probably offers more options for the intermediate climber.

For the beginner climber the Blue Mountains is nowhere near as good as Arapiles or the Grampians, the easier routes do tend to be the chossier ones. For the intermediate to advanced climber though, the Blue Mountains is fantastic. The beginner climber should not be put off however, as the Blue Mountains probably has more climbing companies offering introductions to climbing, than anywhere else in the country. The Blueys is a fantastic place to spend time, although it can be a little more expensive than other areas, due to having so many more temptations.

Access Issues:

The Blue Mountains are a World Heritage listed area. The Grose Valley, the cliffs around Katoomba and much of the Narrow Neck peninsula are part of the Blue Mountains National Park which is managed by the NPWS. The Western Escarpment - where most of the climbing is - is Crown Land managed by the BMCC. While the NPWS Plan of Management nominates several locations in the National Park where rock climbing is deemed appropriate, the majority of the climbing remains unacknowledged. To maintain access our best approach is to 'Respect Native Habitat, Tread Softly and Leave No Trace'.

Approach:

An hour and a half’s drive west of Sydney (80kms). There is a train line that runs right across the top of the Blue Mountains plateau and many stations (e.g. Blackheath) are in very close proximity to the crags. There is also a bus service.

Where To Stay:

Camping isn't fantastic; there are free campgrounds in the Megalong Valley, Mt York and Perrys Lookdown but they are a long way from the crags if you don't have a car and have limited facilities. Blackheath has a BMCC operated campground which offers security and showers and is in the centre of the main climbing hub. Katoomba has plenty of hostels and there are many bed and breakfast type places through the mountains, if you can afford it. It really is a place where a car is needed to make the best of the area.

Ethic:

Mixed-climbing on gear and bolts has generally been the rule in the Blueies. Please try to use available natural gear where possible, and do not bolt cracks or potential trad climbs.

Because of the softness of Blue Mountains sandstone, bolting should only be done by those with a solid knowledge of glue-in equipping. A recent fatality serves as a reminder that this is not an area to experiment with bolting.

If you do need to top rope, please do it through your own gear as the wear on the anchors is both difficult and expensive to maintain.

It would be appreciated if brushing of holds becomes part of your climbing routine - do it with a soft bristled brush and never a steel brush!

The removal of vegetation - both from the cliff bases and the climbs - is not seen as beneficial to aesthetics of the environment nor to our access to it. Generally it's best to leave all this sort of stuff to the local climbers.

History:

Birthplace of climbing in Australia?

1.8.2. Wolgan Valley 537 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 150.244091, -33.242901

1.8.3. Evans Crown Tarana 131 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad, Sport and other styles

Long/Lat: 149.924886, -33.548850

Unique Features And Strengths:

Granite in the Blueys?

Access Issues:

Evans Crown Tarana is a Nature Reserve so when climbing please keep your impact to a minimum so that NPWS doesn't ban climbing.

Approach:

From Sydney drive over the Blueys towards Lithgow and hang a left onto Rydal Road towards Lake Lyell. You'll eventually hit a T-intersection. Turn right and then left almost immediately onto Sodswalls-Tarana Rd - follow this for about 10 clicks until you hit Honeysuckle Falls Road - a dirt road.

About 1.5k up the road there's a small parking area in front of a "Evans Crown Nature Reserve" sign.

Head up the track for about 15 minutes until you bump into Deckout Buttress.

Ethic:

National Parks and Wildlife Service have requested the following:

Contact Bathurst district NPWS before climbing

No new routes to be developed

No cleaning of rock faces

No camping or fires within the reserve

No use of bolts, fixtures or identifying routes with paint

History:

Dave Tanner an old climbing partner of John Ewbank visited Tarana in 1971.

Joe Friend put up a bunch of routes in late 70s after which it lay dormant until 1987 when Crunch (John Smoothy) and Mark Colyvan went nuts and put up heaps of stuff.

Most activity ceased around the end of 1989.

1.8.4. Mt Canobolas 3 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 148.981443, -33.378145

1.9. Southern Tablelands 1,184 routes in Crag

Summary:
Boulder, Sport and other styles

Long/Lat: 149.560756, -34.821083

1.9.1. Cinderella Crag 26 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Sport
Unique Features And Strengths:

A new sport-climbing crag up steep white and orange sandstone. It is full of features and up to 40 metres in height. French translation of Cinderella is "of the ashes"

Description:

Crag gets morning sun, and shade after about 1pm. The base of the crag is a bit of a dustbowl - bring a large rope tarp. The crag also appears to heavily seep after extended rain.

Access Issues:

None… Until they lock the fire road gate then expect a long walk or bike ride. Keep a low profile when drilling, there are some people lurking around the fire trails on the weekends. Well maintained fire trail access is fine with a 2WD

Approach:

From Sydney, get on the M31 freeway and head south, take the XXXXX exit. From here locate XXXXX XXXXX road and follow this for 3.5 km, cross the railway and turn left into XXXX XXXXXX and continue for a further 4.5km until your speedo reads 8km. I think the road changes its name somewhere along this section of road to Wxxxx XXXXX Reset your speedo here at house number 392.

0.1km - Cross the railway

0.8km - Pass thru open gate and continue along dirt fire trail for 4.5km (just under 10min drive)

5.3km - Arrive at commuter car park

From here its an easy 2 min walk to the crag (follow the grey tape in the trees)

Where To Stay:

Camping is possible at the top of the crag.

Ethic:

Ring bolted sport routes with lower offs

History:

Discovered by Mark Farrell 15 years ago. Simon Vaughan given a pass after much badgering.

1.9.2. Bungonia Gorge 214 routes in Crag

Summary:
Boulder, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 150.009497, -34.798623

Unique Features And Strengths:

Limestone gorge two hours from Sydney, three from the blue mountains. Need I say more. Only 1.5hrs from Canberra

Description:

Up to 300m limestone multi-pitch climbing with single pitch sport and bouldering at the base. Some shorter climbs are on scattered crags at the top of the gorge (Reflux Crag, Adams Lookout area). Rap-in, climb-out area at Cooee Point.

Access Issues:

The park is occasionally closed for feral animal control. Check here: http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/alert/state-alerts

Approach:

For the main deal, 3 min drive to the look out and then 30-40 min steep walk down the red track into the slot canyon. Cooee Point, Reflux Crag and Adams Lookout are a 15 minute walk from the car, if you find your way OK.

Where To Stay:

Camping on site. $10 per night plus $7 per car.

1.9.3. Nerriga 96 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport, Boulder and other styles

Long/Lat: 150.136836, -35.088858

1.9.4. The Monastery 75 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 150.254420, -34.675307

Description:

The Monastery is a compact collection of sandstone boulders and walls along the base of a small cliff beside the reclaimed site of the old Penrose rubbish dump. There is a lot of rock in the area and no doubt many more fantastic bouldering areas are awaiting discovery nearby.

Approach:

The get here just get yourself to the town of Bundanoon (great for a morning coffee and breakfast before a day at the crag) and head towards the town of Penrose on Penrose Road. A couple of kilometres out of Bundanoon turn left onto Teudts Road. Just 400 metres down Teudts Road you will see a small dirt track turning off on your left. Turn in here and follow it along just past the old site of the rubbish dump (now a grass field just on your left.

History:

It first saw climbers visit in the early 1990’s with Adam Herdman and Pat Butler nabbing a few of the classic roadside face climbs but then more recently saw extensive development by Chas Ruffles, Ian Phillips, Ryan Winn, the Zuchetto Brothers, Phil Staples and more.

1.9.5. Wingello 177 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport

Long/Lat: 150.252475, -34.710215

Unique Features And Strengths:

Wingello has a good variety of climbing combined with fairly easy access and camping which make for a fantastic weekend away. If a day trip is more to your liking, Wingello is only an hour down the freeway from Liverpool in South Western Sydney. So it is well within the 2 hour day trip limit.

Description:

The crag is located in a great location over looking beautiful bushland about 20 minutes out of Wingello. The best coffee in Wingello is served at the Wingello Village store, which is located just over the railway tracks in the down town metropolis. They also sell pies, bread and basic lunch supplies. They open early on weekdays, but 8am on Saturdays – closed on Sundays. The walls of Supa Fun Happy and La Paz have some fantastic climbing with amazing almost Grampians like sandstone. Supa Fun Happy is a good wall to start at with a good mix of grades.

Access Issues:

Warning! Recently (March 2013) National Parks have erected a locked gate 200m from the fire fighters memorial and several very large boulders placed on the road at the entrance of the memorial. Keep in mind, if you park at the gate there is every chance that another climbing party could park you in resulting in a long stay if you return to your car and don't know where they're climbing.

From Sydney: Wingello is about 1 hour from the M7/M5 intersection and the crag itself is about 20 minutes out of Wingello (depending on your car). Wingello is best reached (from Sydney) by busting straight down the Hume Hwy to the turn off just after the Paddy’s River bridge. You can also go through Bundanoon but its probably a bit slower. From Macca’s on the Freeway its 11.5km to the Wingello turn off, and another 8km from there to the Wingello Railway Crossing. Reset your speedo on the railway line or at the shop .

From Canberra:

Reset Speedo at NSW Border on Federal Highway. The BP at Marulan is 110kms or 1hr drive. Wingello turn off is 124.7km or 1hr 10 mins. The railway crossing at Wingello is 131.6km or 1 hr 15mins.

Approach:

Detailed Directions from Wingello

  1. (0.0km) - Cross the railway track and turn right. Stop at General Store for supplies or lunch. Grab a coffee and a pie.

  2. (0.1km)- Take 1st LEFT onto Forest Road.

  3. (2.8km)- Continue along into Wingello State Forest,, past the state forest sign.

  4. (4.2km)- Turn RIGHT into Running Creek Road at campground ie. The grassy area between the tall trees

  5. (4.4km)- Turn LEFT about 100m later into Gulp Road

  6. (4.8km)- Veer leftish onto smaller looking road (its still Gulp Road) at first intersection

  7. (5.5km)- Veer right at next ‘V’ intersection

  8. (8.6km)- Take the LEFT most track at the clearing with the big tree. There is a sign "Morton National Park" at this point. The track gets a little rough from here but is ok for 2wd with a little care. Please ensure you get someone to check your vehicles ground clearance when going over the sharp rises.

  9. (10.9km)- Arrive at a fenced carpark with large gate at the northern end. Park here, grab your gear and walk through the gate to the fireman’s memorial.

  10. Take the LEFT fire trail down the very steep hill.

  11. Eastern Access: After approximately 200m down the hill is a track on the right, this track is to access the cliff from the eastern end. Follow this track for 150m till a small cairn marks the track decent down on the left, follow over a some rock drops and down to a gully.

  12. Western Access: (Super Fun Happy Wall, etc) Continue straight down hill to a large flat rock platform. (Tape used to marks most of the trail but if in doubt just follow the cliff line until you come across the access gully). A small cairn marks the track on the right of the platform. Follow down for 100m till you reach some fixed ropes and rungs. The walk in to this access gully takes approx 20 mins from the car.

1.9.6. Tallong 14 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 150.105802, -34.734365

1.9.7. The Chopping Block 12 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport

Long/Lat: 150.227750, -34.554034

Description:

Small out crop in Belangalo Forest. Nice featured rock, potential for lots more routes scattered in the gorges around the area.

1.9.8. Binalong 279 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Boulder

Long/Lat: 148.621686, -34.672601

Description:

A nearby bouldering area is about all you're likely to find here, but there's some possibility of climbing nearby, particularly a cliff on private property that looks to be ~15 metres high.

1.9.9. Mt Alexandra 133 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport, Unknown and Trad

Long/Lat: 150.455956, -34.442432

Description:

A great crag in Mittagong, an hour and twenty minutes drive from Sydney and a good change from Nowra. Climbs are mostly sports with the odd trad line thrown in. Faces north west so can get a bit hot during summer, but because of the altitude tends to stay cooler than Nowra.

Approach:© (bundybear)

To get to Mt. Alexandra from Sydney follow the Hume 'Highway' until it is possible to turn off into Mittagong.

Follow the road into Mittagong. Once you pass the Information Center on your L take the next R just past the petrol station. Take the next L then turn R into 'Victoria' St. Follow this as it climbs steeply up until its end in a dirt carpark, park here. Walk towards the rock cutting past the obvious overhanging bouldering area on your R (Sico wall) turn L down hill and pass another bouldering area (Garth's gallery) turn downhill again and follow the track to the base of the cliffs.

1.9.10. Area 51 7 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport and Trad

Long/Lat: 150.458920, -34.439819

Description:© (bundybear)

Useful Info: Area 51, also known as Groom Lake, is a secret military facility about 90 miles north of Las Vegas. The number refers to a 6-by-10-mile block of land, at the center of which is a large air base the government will not discuss. The site was selected in the mid-1950s for testing of the U-2 spyplane, due to its remoteness, proximity to existing facilities and presence of a dry lake bed for landings. Groom Lake is America's traditional testing ground for "black budget" aircraft before they are publicly acknowledged. The facility and surrounding areas are also associated -- with varying levels of credibility -- with UFO and conspiracy stories. In 1989, Bob Lazar claimed on a Las Vegas television station that he had worked with alien spacecraft at Papoose Lake, south of Area 51. Since then, "Area 51" has become a popular symbol for the alleged U.S. Government UFO cover-up.

Routes are described right to left as you approach the crag.

Approach:© (bundybear)

Park at the Gym/Swimming Pool Carpark.

Head straight up the hill on foot, passing the gym until you reach the fire access road (about 20 metres past the gym). There is a sign calling it the RED Track.

Follow this road down hill as it runs beside the Nattai River (looks more like a creek). After four or five minutes you should see a wooden post painted white on the bottom and red on top on the left side of the fire access road.

Walk 108 steps past this and then turn right off the road into bush down towards the river. Look for yellow tape on trees and cairns to guide the way.

Cross river easily and walk up steep hill veering gradually left as you go. Head up towards the cliffs at the top (about three to five minutes).

When you get to the cliff turn left and look for the ring bolts about five to ten metres along cliff. The first climb you come to is 'Butch'. This is a new crag so expect some loose rock for a while.

1.9.11. Mt Gibraltar 13 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport and Trad

Long/Lat: 150.431552, -34.466768

1.9.12. Perpendicular Rock 35 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Trad

Long/Lat: 150.097235, -34.310066

Description:

A big bluff of diorite looming over the Wollondilly river valley, this unique and obscure crag is guaranteed to provide adventure.

The Sydney Rockies online guide can be found here: http://routes.sydneyrockies.org.au/confluence/display/nswrock/Wollondilly

Access Issues:

On private property. Permission to climb was apparently granted by the landowners in 1998. The block the crag is located on is completely undeveloped, and you almost certainly will not run into a soul.

Approach:

Wombeyan Caves Road, then a big slog up the hill through the bush and up the talus.

Where To Stay:

Camping in the Wollondilly valley is described in the guide. If you're driving down from Sydney the night before, the Wollondilly Lookout, on your right a short while after you go through the old sandstone tunnel, is a good but exposed bivy spot.

Ethic:

Purely trad. Not a single bolt here.

1.9.13. The Loony Bin 14 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport and Unknown

Long/Lat: 150.502451, -34.682571

Unique Features And Strengths:

Great rock. All the starts are hard, most routes have a roof or two.

Description:

12 metre high wall capped with a roof in most places. Vertical to steep routes on beautiful rock. Routes described left to right.

Access Issues:

National park land so take care with new routes. Park at the 2nd Shellhaven sign as you leave Fitzroy Fall.

Approach:

Walk up the road for two minutes.

Ethic:

Bolts.

1.9.14. The Sanctuary 14 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Sport

Long/Lat: 150.443909, -34.441897

Description:

A collection of cliffs from 10 to 20 metres in height overlooking a picturesque valley. Near Mittangong, details TBA

1.9.15. To be deleted 0 routes in Area

1.10. Snowy Mountains 80 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad, Boulder and other styles

Long/Lat: 148.866281, -36.358254

1.10.1. Blue Lake 54 routes in Area

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 148.313099, -36.403617

1.10.2. Club Lake 2 routes in Area

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 148.291251, -36.412308

1.10.3. Mount Clarke 2 routes in Area

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 148.295287, -36.432458

1.10.4. Mount Townsend 2 routes in Area

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 148.258688, -36.423465

1.10.5. Barry Way 0 routes in Area

1.10.6. Perisher Blue 13 routes in Area

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 148.405136, -36.396624

1.10.7. Jindabyne 6 routes in Area

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 148.614715, -36.422798

1.10.8. Ramshead Range 1 route in Unknown

Summary:
All Ice

Long/Lat: 148.257793, -36.492972

Description:

The Ramshead Range is part of the Snowy Mountains in New South Wales, Australia. It extends from Dead Horse Gap in the south (near the New South Wales-Victoria state border) towards Thredbo. It is not far south of Mount Kosciuszko, the highest mainland point in Australia. The peaks of the range are around 2,100 m in altitude and the range is generally covered in snow from June through to October, making it suitable for winter climbing. The range is most commonly accessed from Dead Horse Gap or by the Kosciuszko Express Quad Chair at Thredbo. The number of peaks in the Ramshead Range is debatable: however it is commonly accepted that the South Ramshead, the Ramshead proper and the North Ramshead are all proper peaks. The peak between Ramshead and North Ramshead is sometimes known as the 'Central' Ramshead.

1.11. Northwest Slopes and plains 389 routes in Region

Summary:
Unknown, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 149.902545, -30.107391

1.11.1. Kaputar 389 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 150.142584, -30.289936

1.12. Central Western Slope and Plains 235 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

Long/Lat: 147.888469, -32.350568

1.12.1. Warrumbungles 235 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

Long/Lat: 149.005306, -31.282894

1.12.2. Cowra 0 routes in Region

Description:

Granite bouldering right in the middle of town.

1.13. South West Slopes 0 routes in Region

1.14. Riverina 75 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 145.663287, -34.746873

1.14.1. Hermits Cave 0 routes in Crag

Unique Features And Strengths:

Bouldering on great solid sandstone

Description:

Suburban bouldering in the middle of Griffith. Loads of problems on the orange boulders below the Hermits Lookout. At the top of the cliffs the rock appears to be quite conglomerate, but the rock quality on the boulders is similar to Gramps sandstone.

Access Issues:

From the Griffith CBD follow the signs to Scenis Hill Reserve, turning right at the top of the hill towards the Hermits Cave tourist walk on Scenic Drive. From the car park/lookout go down the stairs on the left and follow the multiple tracks around the base of the boulders to the right.

The area can also be reached from the Lawford Cres, next to the Ted Scobie Oval. There is a rough track that you can drive your car on to get to the boulders if you are to lazy to walk.

1.14.2. The Rock 65 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 147.074419, -35.283397

Description:

Know as Kengal to the local Wiradjuri people, The Rock towers 250 metres over the surrounding countryside, and is thought to have been a site for initiation ceremonies. The reserve is an island of natural habitat for native animals, including the turquoise parrot and glossy black cockatoo.

The Rock Nature Reserve is in the southern Riverina of New South Wales, and lies on the boundary of two major physiographic regions: the Riverine Plain and the western slopes of the Eastern Highlands.

On a clear day, you can see Mount Kosciuszko and the Victorian Alps from the top of the three kilometre Yerong nature track.

Access Issues:

This reserve is 6 km west of The Rock village on Lockhart Road, 35 km east of Lockhart and 40 km south-west of Wagga Wagga off the Olympic Highway. From 1st July to 31 December The Rock is closed to all 'Rock Sports', due to breeding Peregrine Falcons.

Approach:

Approach time to The Towers is 20 Minutes, Central Buttress is 25 Minutes, and The Main Face is 35 Minutes

Where To Stay:

There is no camping within The Rock Nature Reserve, visitors can stay the night at The Rock Village, or find other accommodation options in neighbouring towns including Wagga Wagga

1.14.3. Holbrook 10 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 147.391235, -35.724850

1.15. Lower Western 0 routes in Region

1.16. Upper Western 0 routes in Region

1.17. Australian Capital Territory 2,449 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad, Boulder and other styles

Long/Lat: 149.021442, -35.466148

Description:

Generally - must love granite. The ACT is ringed with a large number of cliffs - for such a small geographical area - the majority of which are granite. Trad and mixed climbing is a focus, with Booroomba Rocks, Gibraltar Peak, Orroral Ridge and other such granite areas presenting opportunities for single and multi-pitch climbing up to hundreds of metres tall. Many of them also present interesting opportunities to test the mental faculties above large runouts as well!

However, don't be fooled by the name of the local guide (ACT Granite), sport climbing on other types of rock is by no means unrepresented in the area with a number of crags such as Red Rocks and those to be found in the Mount Coree area providing opportunities for late teen to late grade twenty climbing on river-style rhyolite rock. The ACT currently has climbs of grades up to 28/29, with the opportunity to free some (very) old aid climbs and move the route grades into the 30s. Bouldering is up to V11/12. Climbers new to granite, slab and/or crack climbing are encouraged to jump on a few lower grade climbs before throwing themselves headlong into an epic!

Climbing is fairly accessible in the ACT, with both Kambah Rocks and Red Rocks within easy reach of the city itself. A number of other crags close to the city have either seen access closed (Ginninderra Falls, Michelago) or have fallen off the radar of current climbers in favour of the established granite cliffs and tors.

Bouldering in the area is mostly on granite and generally quite accessible, particularly Cooleman Ridge. For a break from small granite crimps, a reasonable number of boulder problems can also be found at Red Rocks. There is reasonable potential for new problems in a number of areas around the ACT.

If you are having difficulty finding the areas - and some can be very difficult to find, the following link may be of use:

http://maps.google.com.au/maps/ms?hl=en&ie=UTF8&t=p&msa=0&msid=202220939889529959331.0004614316914ba5e0cf2&ll=-35.469618,149.136658&spn=1.263842,2.103882&z=9

1.17.1. Booroomba Rocks 354 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 148.993454, -35.561862

Unique Features And Strengths:

Like much of Canberra, Booroomba showcases the qualities of granite.

Description:

Booroomba Rocks is one of the classic traditional areas of Canberra, and often considered one of the gems of Australian climbing, ranking behind Arapiles, but not by far. A large, proud cliff that can be seen from Canberra, it is home to the tallest climbs in Canberra, though often the final metres of the taller climbs are more a walk-off than any kind of climbing. Expect adventure and come prepared with your rack and a strong lead head.

Approach:

Drive to Tharwa and continue south on the Naas road for about 10 kilometres, then turn right onto Apollo Road towards the site of the Honeysuckle Creek Tracking Station (Apollo Road is the turnoff to the right at the top of the hill above Naas). Follow Apollo Road for 8.9 kilometres, turning right about 400 metres before the old Tracking Station site. Follow this track for about 2.5 kilometres until you reach the carpark. The road is usually passable in two wheel drive vehicles, noting that there is one steep section that will require a bit of grunt or a run up. Booroomba Rocks is signposted - take the well trodden path that starts on the northern side, grunt uphill for about twenty minutes to a fireplace and campsite. 50m straight ahead is the lookout above Middle Rocks; to the left is the track down to the South Buttress and Cocker's Gully; and to the right is a track to the Cave Wall area and the top of the North Buttress. 50m to the left (looking out) of the Middle Rocks lookout is a track that doubles back under the lookout, down through Middle Rocks to the base of the North Buttress, Central Slabs, Snickers Wall and the Northern Slabs.

Where To Stay:

The most pleasant camping is at Honeysuckle campground (the site of the old tracking station), with grassy sites, toilets, tank water and a plethora of boulders to play on. Camping is OK at the top fireplace, but you have to lug all your water up the hill.

Ethic:

The ethic at Booroomba is generally staunchly traditional. Most climbing goes either entirely on gear or gear with bolts for those walls where there is insufficient gear to protect climbs. Climbs are occasionally rebolted, but retro-bolting would be considered vandalism of the lowest order.

History:

The first climbs at Booroomba Rocks were put up around 1966, and from then it saw consistent development from a number of strong crankers. Bolts started appearing over the years on a number of climbs, though never very many and only to accompany natural gear where possible. Since then a handful of climbs have been added that go purely on bolts, simply due to the lack of opportunities for natural protection. However, the prevailing style here is placing gear and adventurous climbing.

1.17.2. Gibraltar and Corin Road 320 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad, Sport and other styles

Long/Lat: 148.929818, -35.489085

Description:

The Corin Road area is home to Gibraltar Peak, a Granite Tor that stands proud above the Tidbinbilla valley to its north west and and the narrow Gibraltar Creek valley to its south, and several worthwhile smaller crags. Snake Rock (great for a winter day or late summer afternoon), Bandito Wall (probably the easiest access crag - great for a summer morning). Several more crags are scattered along the Corin Road and in Tidbinbilla valley and its flanks.

Where To Stay:

Woods Reserve on Corin Road offers camping in pleasant surrounds by a creek.

1.17.3. Orroral Ridge 367 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad, Sport and other styles

Long/Lat: 148.958794, -35.600391

Unique Features And Strengths:

Orroral Ridge is a good alternative to Booroomba and in much the same style, if, like Gibraltar Peak, shorter.

Approach:©

Drive out on Apollo Road as for 'Booroomba', but go all the way to the squashed remains of the Honeysuckle Creek Tracking Station (at the end of the bitumen). The dirt road, starting from just right of the gate here, provides access to all the 'Orroral Ridge' outcrops. The condition of the road varies, but 2WD is generally possible. Beyond 'Honeysuckle Crag' the road winds up to a carpark where, once upon a time, a big scaffolding tower stood, above 'Tower Rocks'. The road passes a turnoff on the left (locked gate) which leads past 'The Battlements' and into the 'Orroral Valley'. See topo/map.

1.17.4. Orroral Valley 97 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 148.954434, -35.629659

Where To Stay:©

There is a national park campsite near the entrance to Orrorral Valley.

1.17.5. River Crags 204 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 148.986739, -35.240271

Description:

A number of crags in the ACT situated along either the Molonglo or other rivers nearby.

1.17.6. Lost Vegas 30 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport

Long/Lat: 148.842654, -35.295449

Unique Features And Strengths:©

Long, gently overhanging sport climbs, with a good range of grades.

Description:©

Eyed off for years, developed once a track was established in 2013. Shady until about 2 o'clock in summer,, and catches any stray breeze meaning it is often cool enough in the afternoon as well.

Access Issues:©

The carpark and cliff are in Canberra's water catchment, meaning no camping. Please don't disturb the peregrine falcons on the upper cliff, particularly during nesting season: start of August to end of January.

Approach:©

There are two options - you get to choose whether to walk downhill on the way in, or the way out, and whether you prefer a shorter walk or a shorter drive.

Option 1: drive along Brindabella Road and turn right onto Blue Range Road. Wind your way along this road to the top of the hill (lat/long -35.2863,148.8524). Either park here or walk. Turn left and continue 300m south along a rougher 4wd track, until you get to a low point in the road (lat/long -35.28952, 148.85127). From here, a walking track heads downhill to the cliff, passing many tape markers. 20 minute approach, 35 minute return.

Option 2: drive along Brindabella Road towards Picadilly Circus, and right after you hit the dirt turn right onto Curries Road. Follow this for about 100m then turn right (there will be a No Through Road sign here). Follow this to the end and park (long/lat -35.3118, 148.8433).

Step over the rocks and walk 20m downhill, then turn right at the track (do not go straight ahead across the creek). Follow the track for 50m to a creek crossing. On the other side of the creek turn left and go steeply uphill, going over lots of waterbars. The track follows a spur. Keep going uphill for 20 minutes or so, passing a turn-off on your left, and eventually you'll see a cairn, some tape and a number plate on the left (lat/long -35.3003, 148.847). Follow the walking track for 20 minutes to the cliff, with occasional tape markers. 40-50 minute approach, 35-40 minute return, plus the time you spend splashing in the creek at the bottom.

Where To Stay:©

There are official campsites at Blue Range Hut and at Corree campground. Blue Range Hut is 2.6km along Blue Range Road from the Brindabella road intersection, and requires you to book and pay. Coree campground is a short walk from the junction of Two Sticks Road and the Coree Summit trail, and is free with no bookings.

1.17.7. Hollywood 23 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport

Long/Lat: 148.805556, -35.308455

Unique Features And Strengths:

Steep, hard and short.

Description:

On the western slopes of Mt Coree just above Two Sticks Rd is this large boulder with some of the ACT's hardest routes. It is shadier than Coree's summit and because of the altitude quite a lot cooler than most Canberra crags. It is possible to boulder at the bottom of the climbs, though none of them are particularly tall in any case.

Approach:

While driving towards Mount Coree on Two Sticks Road you will pass a scree slope. Park and walk up the scree for 30m to get to the cliff.

History:

Few dates of first ascents have been recorded.

1.17.8. Mount Coree 59 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport

Long/Lat: 148.809239, -35.307522

Unique Features And Strengths:

For those who want a break from granite, and to do some proper sport climbing to boot, Mount Coree offers a lot of fun, particularly with its nearby bakery/chalet. It's best to arrive early in the morning if you want to get the best croissants!

The rock type at Mount Coree is similar to what you would find at Kambah Rocks or Red Rocks, with hidden holds abounding on many of the routes, however it has better friction and is stronger to boot, with rock fall less likely.

Description:

Mount Coree can be seen from Piccadilly Circus, a large rock tor looking out over valleys at a height of 1350-1400 metres above sea level. The mountain can get quite cold in winter and does see some snow, and best climbing is therefore in autumn and spring. However, don't listen to tales that summer days can be brutal and painful - with a bit of wind, the height of the cliffs contributes to between a 5 and 7 degree drop in temperature which can make things quite pleasant. That said, the cliff is the right colour to reflect a lot of heat and UV so be careful with your sunscreen.

There is some talk of rebolting but the current climbs are galvanised steel, and are showing some rust. If you're feeling philanthropic, take some new stainless maillons or shackles to replace some of the more rusted lower-offs.

Approach:

Head out to Brindabella Road via Uriarra Road or the Cotter towards Piccadilly Circus, which is an intersection on a saddle with Two Sticks Road and Mount Franklin Road. At Piccadilly Circus, turn right onto Two Sticks Road and follow for around 8km to pass a scree slope, uphill of which is Hollywood. Continue onward further then turn right onto the Mt Coree Summit trail. This road, beyond the campsite, is in poor condition. A 4WD is required.

An alternative approach can be taken via Curries Road. Take the first right a couple hundred meters after the Brindabella Road turns to dirt, towards Blundells Flat. After a small creek crossing, turn left and wind your way up the hill to join Two Stick Road a few hundred meters before Hollywood. Curries Road is slightly rough, a 4WD is recommended.

An even more direct approach can be made via Pabral road, by continuing on straight after the Blundells Flat creek crossing to join the Mt Coree summit trail. Pabral Road is rough in spots, a 4WD is recommended.

History:

Mount Coree saw some climbing in 1958 by John Hammond, and a number of routes were put up which are now lost to history.

Between 1996-1999, George and Sarah Fieg, Nathan Wales, Chris Warner, Justin Ryan and Glen Jones put up the current routes.

1.17.9. Bendora 10 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Trad

Long/Lat: 148.841194, -35.439582

Unique Features And Strengths:

Solid, sometimes exploding Arapiles rock, adventurous approaches and an isolated feel make this a unique place

Description:

A region of rock extending from Bendora Dam through to Mt Tidbinbilla, with numerous cliffs that are bigger and further away than it first appears. There are few recorded ascents and plenty of potential for adventure.

Access Issues:

Most of this area is in Canberra's water catchment. Climbing is allowed, but camping is not.

Approach:

Drive to Picadilly Circus, turn left towards Mt Franklin, then left again to drop down to Bendora Dam. If you don't mind bumpy, windy dirt roads, it's about an hour's drive from Canberra.

1.17.10. Southern ACT 66 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 148.981501, -35.787221

Description:

Contains the areas south of ACT including Mount Scabby, but not including Michelago (see River Crags for the limestone crag in Michelago).

1.17.11. Black Range bouldering 448 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 149.539728, -35.429149

Unique Features And Strengths:

FIRST AND FOREMOST - bring a wire-bristle brush, attached to a broom if possible, and a soft bristled brush. This place grows moss like crazy! But has *AMAZING features for granite.

Description:

A fair distance out of Canberra, these granite boulders are situated in the hills of Tallaganda National Park, in a eucalypt forest. The area was first developed as a bouldering area by Duncan Brown and has since seen a lot of development by Chris Warner, George Fieg and Andrew Bull among others. The boulders are wide-spread and numerous, and most likely home of the greatest number of problems Canberra has to offer, which are quickly being recorded and topographically described due to the hard work of Duncan Brown and other keen climbers.

Access Issues:

These boulders lie in a national park. While there are no current access restrictions, please respect the nature of the park and aim to minimise your impact.

Approach:

Drive out of Queanbeyan towards Bungendore on the Kings Highway and take a right onto Captain's Flat Road. After driving for a fair while turn left onto Briars Sharrow Road (this is easily missed). Cross the creek and continue a short distance, taking the next right. Drive to the end of this road and at the T-intersection turn right, to Hoskinstown. Drive through the town and take a left onto a dirt road (Forbes Creek Road). The dirt road continues for some 15-20 kilometres through fairly rough terrain (but doable for a 2WD) - continue on until you reach a small parking area with an information sign. Back up the road some five metres and to the right is The Hill, and on the left are the remainder of the areas. Allow 1 to 1.5 hours to get there from Canberra.

History:

A description provided by Duncan Brown to australianbouldering.com:

"I first found North Black in 1999 shortly after starting climbing but believing everything to be too hard it was left alone until I returned with my brother Jarvis, Ky Wittich and Chris Webb in early 2000. That year saw us develop most of the problems in two areas: the Campground and the Hill, leaving pretty much only the hardest lines undone. Some of the most notable asscents of that year were Leeson Roses 'Percival the Fiesty Mouse' V8, my 'The Mojo Connection' V7 and Ky's establishment of the desperate 'Bumknut' V5??? (which remained unrepeated despite many strong attempts until Elmar Jerg managed it in June,2002). During that time many other classic hard lines were cleaned but awaited (and some still await) someone strong enough to send them. At the end of 2000 some new keen developers joined in, most notably Andrew Bull & George Fieg. Over the next year or so they cleaned up numerous unfinished projects including Andrew's spectacular 'Nob Jockey' V8, as well as finding and developing several new areas just down the road such as Dog Rock, Wombat Rock, the Asteroid and a few unnamed areas, all of which contain dozens of beautiful granite problems of all styles and grades. The last year has also seen visits from some of our strong northern cousins with 'Sticky' Dale repeating almost every problem V9 and over in a single weekend and Zac Vertrees snagging the first ascent of one of the most amazing lines in the area 'Zacs Arete'(aka'the Nothing') V9. North Black is situated in the mountains about 30kms south of the town of Bungendore which is just east of Canberra (you will find it on most road maps). It is an amazing setting with granite boulders of all sizes scattered throughout the forested hills. This is a place with something for everyone; slabs through to super steep, easy as they come through to desperate unfinished projects with plenty of everything else in between with most of the problems being in the below V3 bracket. It is also one of the few places where you can spend all day putting up new problems, so bring a brush!"

1.17.12. Corin Road Bouldering 113 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 148.947825, -35.474015

Unique Features And Strengths:

Best featured granite boulders (with actual holds) in Canberra.

Description:

A number of boulders can be found along Corin Road. Note that the crags in the Corin Road area (Bandido Wall, Hideout Wall, Square Rock etc) can be found under Gibraltar Peak. Like most of the rest of Canberra, the boulders around Corin Road are granite, and require good contact strength, balance and sometimes a fair bit of nerve to top out. Highball problems are a bit more common here, and there's a few that will test the V6 climber's nerve to the limits. The area has some potential for new problems, and some further work cataloguing existing problems, for example near Snake Rock.

George's Boulder is a good place for a quick stop-off and boulder if you're stretched for time, and if you have more time, Cantaloupe Hill holds enough to keep all but the very strong busy.

Access Issues:

Access is along forestry roads, which in some cases may require a 4WD or just a bit of extra walking. If you have a low clearance car you can park a few hundred metres past the Woods Reserve turnoff (good visibility both directions for parking and also driving away) and walk up from there. It is about 200m to the dirt road, and another 200m to the 4WD parking area, so it isn't a great deal more effort.

Approach:

Either through the Cotter via Cotter Road down towards Tidbinbilla, or through Point Hut Road.

Cantaloupe Hill: turn onto Corin Road, then it's around 6km until you reach a turn-off to Woods Reserve. Around 400 metres past this, a dirt forestry track on your right leads up towards Cantaloupe Hill. Drive (the road is quite rutted) or walk straight up this road until you reach a fork where it turns left and right. Ignore these - the walking track is directly in front of you, marked with a cairn or two at the start.

George's Boulder: The second dirt track turn-off on Corin Road, found 2.6km (as the crow flies) after the turn off onto Corin Road from Tidbinbilla Road. You'll know you've found the right track from its comparatively well-kept surface, and the fact that the dirt track takes an almost immediate right turn. Park at the turn and follow a faint and blackberry-infested path north for about 80 metres.

1.17.13. Pierce's Creek Bouldering 201 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 148.922973, -35.365752

Description:

An area developed in the main by Justin Ryan and Chris Warner after the Canberra bushfires, Pierce's Creek has hundreds of discrete boulder problems over a wide-ranging area. Unfortunately since the fires the area has seen consistent regrowth of pine and blackberry, rendering climbs difficult to find and the terrain rugged. Only the most intrepid are likely to climb here without a guide (and understandably), but there are still a lot of problems that survive and are good quality.

A note about topos: the darker numbers on topos are those that were checked post the 2003 fires and found to be still in climbable condition.

Approach:

Drive towards and then past the Cotter from town. You'll go through a few switchbacks and then continue past the Cotter dam. Look out on your right for Laurel Camp Road. Don't turn at the Pierce's Creek Forest sign - that's too early; continue on a bit further. Directions for individual areas can be found at the area level.

Ethic:

Quite a few climbs out here have been chipped, and some are completely chipped. That said, there's enough problems here; please don't chip or drill any more.

History:

Pierce's Creek was developed in the main by Chris Warner and Justin Ryan, with Chris developing the excellent guides that have been used as a basis for this guide. A number of other strong Canberra climbers have contributed, including Clinton Szady and Andrew Bull.

1.17.14. Cooleman Ridge Bouldering 116 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 149.034201, -35.361838

Unique Features And Strengths:

Cooleman Ridge comprises mostly granite rocks, similar to most of Canberra. As such, it's an excellent training ground for getting used to granite climbing tactics, although it won't necessarily prepare you for the long runouts you might find when tackling some of the routes around Canberra.

Description:

Cooleman Ridge has a lovely set of boulders set over six semi-distinct areas, spanning VBeginner to V8. Cooleman has a lot more than one might expect at first glance. In fact, it covers the basics of lower grade bouldering, with some steeper and shorter climbs to be found around Niblo and Horse Paddocks, and some taller lines, verging on highballs to be found at Sun Blocks and Pony Boulders. Like most granite, the rock is not hugely featured and many climbs rely more on friction, balance and a bit of nerve to complete than pure strength. The higher grade boulders are exercises in crimping, body tension, and pure willpower. People have been bouldering here since the early 80's so what has been climbed or not is very hard to quantify. It is not the place to be to concerned about grades and lots of variants have been done. There are also boulders that go beyond what this guide covers that have also been climbed on long ago.

Access Issues:

Please be sensible accessing the Horse Paddock boulders if walking in from the Kambah side and go around the horses rather than straight through the pen. Parking for access from this side is on Hake Street.

Approach:

Park in Niblo Pl or Darrell Pl (Chapman) and walk up to the ridge. Alternatively if you want to access Pony or Horse Paddock boulders, you can park on the Kambah side at Hake Street and walk across to the walking track and then uphill. The walks are fairly short through grass.

Ethic:

While some of the harder climbs on the ridge were created by chipping, where previously no climb was possible, please leave your chisels at home. There are not so many climbs at the higher grades that they should be brought down to lower levels!

History:

A detailed history of the geology of cooleman ridge can be found at: http://www.coolemanridge.org/geology.html

Without the hard work of Chris Warner in putting together topos for all of the areas on Cooleman Ridge, much of the information here would most likely have remained in people's heads. Therefore it should be noted that this guide draws heavily on the expertise and information he freely provided to the Canberra Climbers' Association and for that he has the author's thanks.

1.17.15. Black Mountain Bouldering 29 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 149.097249, -35.276204

Unique Features And Strengths:

Black mountain consists of the same type of rock found around Kambah and Mount Coree. Like Coree, it is less polished than the river crags; unfortunately it is also somewhat prone to breaking just like the other areas. Like Coree, the rock also has good friction.

Description:

The boulders of black mountain (or, more accurately, exposed rock faces indigenous to the mountain, as opposed to free standing boulders) are found in a rough ring of the area. While many have visited this area over time, no details have been recorded, other than a brief mention in the local guide of 'black mountain bumdrags'.

The rock here lends itself to many hand and foot-holds, and therefore the climbing is really as hard or as easy as you make it. There is enough simple stuff to make it a great intro to bouldering for beginners who haven't made it outside the gym yet. Though there are also enough crimps, slopes and dynoes around to provide climbing roughly up to V5, including a roof problem or two!

If you're looking for 'that' stellar line that climbs a line of barely possible features, there's a fair few better areas around, particularly Cantaloupe Hill (Corin bouldering) and Black Range.

However, if you're not climbing V8+, or you'd just like a pleasant afternoon out in the sun (which the mountain gets until late, as long as you're on the face near the carpark), black mountain is worth a day trip. Heck, bring a picnic along.

Note that the names and grades of what is here are liable to change for a while until they get solidified. Also you should take them as only being a general idea of the difficulty of the climb, as body morphic issues will become more apparent on eliminates/dynoes etc.

Approach:

The approach to black mountain is near the Australian National University. Turn off just before the Botanic Gardens into Black Mountain Drive and you'll wend your way up a twisty hill (a nice ride, by the way). Park your car or bike in the first parking area on your left as you go up the hill. Follow the "Lakeview" trail from the carpark for about 120m. You'll need to turn right off the track to find the rocks - a broken band of exposed stone up to 5 metres tall.

Where To Stay:

If you're staying in or near the city, this is a good little quick jaunt. Otherwise, there's probably other areas that will take your interest, particularly if you're staying in the south of Canberra and have access to Booroomba Rocks and Orroral Ridge.

History:

This area has been climbed at for many years, but the prevailing trad ethic ("if it's got a runner, it's not bold!!") and resulting disdain for any type of bouldering - particularly bouldering that focuses more on eliminates and/or traversing moves - has meant the problems have remained unrecorded until now.

1.17.16. Buildering 10 routes in Feature

Summary:
Boulder and Unknown
Description:

Buildering - climbing man made structures has a proud history in Canberra. The long traverses of the rough hewn bluestone wall on the iconic National Library are a legacy of determined climbers returning time and again after being turfed off by bored security guards. Sanity and library budgetary constraints prevailed and now it is as much a part of the landscape as the joggers on the lake shore below. As a way of developing your climbing strength - outside and close to where we live it is unsurpassed.

That said... There's other places inside Canberra where you could actually get on a rock and go up. Your choice.

1.17.17. Mount Ainslie Quarry 2 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 149.160598, -35.271518

Description:

After an investigation into the impact of climbing on the area by the ACT Parks and Conservation Service, this cliff was closed in 1994. Please respect the closure.

1.18. Western NSW 0 routes in Region

1.18.1. Wagga 0 routes in Area