Use this Region Guide to easily find and compare Crags.

Table of contents

1. Northern Tablelands 1,855 routes in Region

Summary:
JFMAMJJASOND
seasonality
Boulder, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 151.765129, -29.951277

1.1. Ebor Gorge 181 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 152.340406, -30.402480

Unique Features And Strengths:

Lots of crack and aretes

Description:©

Ebor Falls is part of Guy Fawkes River National Park. All the cliffs are in the National park as is the access to these areas and should thus be treated accordingly. Enough said!

Ebor is a township 77km east of Armidale on the Dorrigo road. The climbing area is just before the town on the Armidale side of the Guy Fawkes river on the cliffs around the falls.

The cliffs consist of short vertical basalt columns (10m - 20m) and virtually all the climbs are sustained cracks of varying size between the columns. The original climbing areas are called ‘Breakaways’ and are numbered 1 to 6 with the first being closest to the falls and the sixth being furthest from the falls.

The more recently developed cliffs have broken with tradition and been given more exotic names so that the very short ‘Dead Heroes Buttress’ is between the 4th and 5th Breakaways, ‘Solid Gold Buttress’ is directly below the left-hand end of the 4th Breakaway and ‘Pub Buttress’ and ‘Bondage Buttress’ are on the other side of the gorge.

Access Issues:©

National Park

Approach:©

Take the Dorrigo road out of Armidale until just before the township of Ebor there is a sign posted road to Ebor falls on your left. Take this road past the graveyard to the first car park (on your right); park here for access to the 1st and 2nd Breakaways, and drive further on to the main car park and picnic area for access to the 3rd - 6th Breakaways, ‘Dead Heroes Buttress’ and ‘Solid Gold Buttress’. To access ‘Pub Buttress’ and ‘Bondage Buttress’ walk across the top of the First Falls and then proceed to the gorge rim on that side of the river.

Where To Stay:©

Camping at the Ebor Falls rest area is banned but you can camp nearby at the Native Dog camping ground. To get there drive west towards Guyra for 12kms. It is part of Cathedral Rock National Park and camp fees apply. It is only an hour’s drive from Armidale so you can easily stay there. There are also an amazing variety of hotels, bed n’ breakfasts, pubs and caravan parks in Armidale.

Ethic:©

Basically, the climbers of Armidale are a prettylaid back, free thinking group and as long as you don’t go out of your way to put people’s noses out of joint you’ll be amazed at how helpful they can be. The quickest way to piss people off is by ripping off projects. There are a few devoted locals making an effort and putting up quality new climbs. A lot of time, hard work and even money goes into their endeavours (cracks can be projects too) and there is too much unclimbed rock around to justify destroying someone else’s motivation. Any routes marked as such or not in the guide should be left alone. The simple courtesy of asking first may save you from being stripped naked and being staked out for the crows to pick your eyes out.

If putting up new routes is your thing then please feel free. However bolting in National Parks is actually illegal and as Ebor is mostly crack climbs there is rarely a need for bolts.

History:©

Ebor holds a rather special place in the history of New England climbing. Due to its pleasant nature, easy access and short well protected climbs it has been an ideal training area where many Armidale climbers have ‘pushed their grades and tested themselves on such classics as ‘Rooflet’ 19, ‘Backdoor Man’ 19, ‘Sleight of Hand’ 19, and ‘Luce’ 21, and as little as about 6 years ago an ascent of any of these test pieces signified your ‘arrival’ into the upper echelon of New England climbers. On the other hand Ebor has broken a lot of hearts. Almost everyone who has climbed there has had at least one of those days when the climbs cease to be inanimate crack lines and become vicious and spiteful beasts, hell bent on seeing you lying on your back on the ground with blood streaming out of your ears. On one such day (in May 1983) after falling off ‘Anxiety Attack’ a few times Paul Colyvan (Animal) in a fit of rage hitchhiked back to Armidale rather than spend a minute longer at the cliff waiting for everyone else to drive back.

Given the extremes of feeling for the place, which is so much a part of the character of the cliff, it is not surprising that the cliff drifts in and out of fashion from time to time. It always manages to attract a few visitors though, even in recent times, when it has been largely overlooked due to its lack of bolt protected wall climbs which are fashionable at present. Considering this lack of interest in recent years it is remarkable that some of New England’s hardest routes are at Ebor, in fact Ebor has always been well represented in the upper grades at any particular point in time and was often the scene of the first climb at a particular grade right from the time of its discovery as a climbing area.

Anyway, the story begins in April 1974, when local, Bob Killip, records the first climb at Ebor on the Third Breakaway, ‘Luce’ 17M1, a thin crack that was aided to a roof which went free. Ironically now that the route is free at 21 the roof is considered about 19 (and some even insist that the roof is the crux). Shortly after that Jill Kelman and Al Stephens also did ‘Haggis Hole’ 13, also on the third breakaway, which was the only other route recorded at Ebor that year, despite Killip’s enthusiasm for the place. In reality Killip would have been climbing near his limit on most climbs at Ebor, since 17 was the highest grade in New England at the time, and no one else was capable of climbing at that standard. So it’s not surprising that development was slow at first, however, the interest was there and it prompted New England climbers to get into crack climbing, a trend which wouldn’t change significantly for nearly 10 years.

In March the following year Killip returned to do ‘Frogwyn D’Harder’ 18 also on the third breakaway, which was New England’s first 18 (although now it is considered 19!). Before that however A1 Stephens and Rob Dixon recorded the first route on the first breakaway in February with ‘Supermouse’ M2 and went on to do a few others on the same breakaway as the year progressed, the best of which is probably ‘The Joker’ 17 led by Dixon. Dixon along with mature age novice Brian Birchall and visiting Queenslander Trevor Gynther also added the first route on the second breakaway with ‘Chunder Chimney’ 12. Also of note from 1975 was Stephens’ route ‘Sundown’ M2 which made the first use of bolts on a climb (for aid) in New England. By the end of 1975 there were still only a total of 13 routes recorded at Ebor. In 1976 Richard Curtis arrived in Armidale and he, like Killip, was keen on hard jam cracks and provided a bit of healthy and friendly competition for Killip, who had dominated Armidale’s hard climbing scene for the past few years. Curtis was particularly keen on Ebor where he added many fine new routes, but the other important thing he was to do was to provide encouragement for Brian Birchall who improved dramatically and also acquired a taste for hard jam cracks such as those found at Ebor. The two teamed up for many first ascents at Ebor and elsewhere such as Kaputar and Gara gorge, although the newly discovered Gara granite areas where neglected somewhat in 1976 for the sake of Ebor. During the year Curtis led the superb ‘Narcissus’ 19 on the First Breakaway, ‘Anxiety Attack’ 19 on the Second Breakaway, freed the Killip route ‘Luce’ 20/21 which was the first climb in new England graded above 20 (it has since been upgraded to 21). That was on the 3rd Breakaway where he also added ‘Prime Cut’ 19/20 with an aid rest, which was overlooked in the description. He also did the testy ‘Knuckleduster’ 18 which was among the first climbs on the Fourth Breakaway. Birchall led ‘Fear and Loathing’ 17 and ‘Rattlesnake’ 18 on the Second Breakaway and the classic ‘Jugular’ 19 (later downgraded to 18) which was the first route recorded on the Fifth Breakaway.

Bob Killip’s only significant contribution at Ebor in 1976 was to steal a route on the 4th breakaway which Curtis had cleaned and not had a chance to climb yet. Killip called the route ‘Rooflet’ 18 (it has since been upgraded to 19). This marked the end of the ‘friendly’ competition between Curtis and Killip. Other routes worth mentioning from 1976 are Jill Kelman’s ‘Double Trouble’ 16 on the 4th Breakaway and Phil Prior’s middle grade classic ‘Caballero’ 14 (since upgraded to 16 after some enthusiastic cleaning years later). The new 2 volume green guide ‘Rockclimbs in New England’ by Bob Killip and Brian Birchall came out in the later part of 1976 and featured 40 routes at Ebor up to grade 19, 27 of which had been added in that year and another 10 were added after the deadline for the guide to bring the years total to 37 new routes and one aid elimination. This was Ebor’s finest hour!

In 1977 Birchall left for Melbourne and Curtis continued on his merry way cleaning up many great climbs at Ebor such as ‘Backdoor Man’ 19 and ‘Sleight of Hand’ 19 on the 4th Breakaway and ‘Affection Injection’ 18 and ‘Bash Street’ 20 on the First Breakaway. He also discovered the 6th Breakaway and did the first easier routes there. Joe Friend arrived in Armidale late in the year and did his only significant routes here, the off width ‘Blinky Bill’ 20 on the First Breakaway and the thin crack ‘Inspiration Point’ 18 on the 5th Breakaway. Killip although still around only made sporadic appearances and led nothing of interest at Ebor in 1977. There were 19 new routes in 1977.

In 1978 both Curtis and Killip left Armidale and Birchall returned from Melbourne but it was Joe Friend who was to dominate the scene in 1978 doing many new routes in Gara Gorge but Ebor apparently didn’t interest him and no new routes were recorded here in 1978.

1979 was a year of general slackness. After Friend left, Birchall was in charge of shop and very little in the way of new routes was done (only 4 at Ebor), the most significant being the rattly fist crack ‘Fidget’ 17 on the 4th Breakaway. It was, however, a period of consolidation after the grade pushing and exploration of the previous few years and it allowed everyone the chance to get out and repeat routes.

There was also a new younger crowd of climbers such as John Lattanzio, Greg Pritchard, Ed Sharpe and later in the year Mark Colyvan, who were keen to push their grades and there was no better place than at Ebor under Birchall’s guiding hand.

1980 saw even more new-comers to Armidale in Paul Bayne and Austin Legler (from the USA). Al Stephens, who had done very little in the past few years jumped into the limelight again with Rob Clark who arrived in Armidale the previous year. The other important development in 1980 was the arrival of ‘Friends’ to New England which had immediate applications at Ebor, and later in the year the use of chalk became common.

The first route to be done in 1980 was Paul Bayne’s lead of an old problem which had been previously attempted by Dick Curtis to give ‘Anyone for Tennis’ 20MO. A couple of months later, also on the Fourth Breakaway, Mark Colyvan led the slippery off width ‘Resurrection Shuffle’ 18M0 and a little later still, visitor Tony Dignan led the classic test piece ‘Brown Buffalo’ 20. However it was the Second Breakaway which received the most attention and yielded many new routes in the latter part of the year.

Clark and Stephens did the classic line ‘Amphetamine Annie’ 18. Austin Legler did ‘Anthrax’ 19M0 (& later freed it at 20) and Lattanzio and Colyvan did many new middle and easy grade routes, the best of which was ‘Hitman’ 15. All in all there were 22 new routes for the year bringing the total to 95 at Ebor at the end of 1980. Lattanzio and Legler left Armidale at the end of the year and Pritchard left early in the next.

At the beginning of 1981 the hardest climb in New England was ‘Demon Dropout’ 21 (later upgraded to 22) put up in 1978 and while Ebor’s hardest was ‘Luce’ 20/21 (later upgraded to 21) freed in 1976. So there had been no advancement in grades at Ebor for 4 years and for 2 years in the rest of New England; that was to change in 198Early in the year Greg Pritchard, Ed Sharp and Al Stephens developed Dead Heroes Buttress and did quite a few routes here, the best of which was ‘Daroof’ 17 led by Stephens. In March Colyvan freed his own route ‘Resurrection Shuffle’ at 18 and later in the same day, along with Ed Sharpe, freed ‘Anyone for Tennis’ 20 under controversial circumstances by preplacing 2 pitons that weren’t present on the first ascent, to protect the scary top section. After much criticism Colyvan removed the pegs and led it free again without them. About midway through the year the new guide book by John Lattanzio and Greg Pritchard came out entitled ‘Climbers Guide to the N.E. Tablelands’ It contained 116 routes recorded at Ebor, although 3 were mistakes (and one omission) so there were 114 routes at this point up to grade 20/2Later that year after the new routing frenzy at Dome Wall had died down, interest reverted to Ebor and Colyvan led (and then freed) the classic offhand crack ‘Lethal Dose’ 21 while also on the 6th breakaway Birchall and Clark took turns on ‘Toxic Shock’ 20 which was one of Clark’s last routes before he left Armidale for Hobart. Right at the end of the year Colyvan led Birchall and Killip up ‘Chemical Warfare’ 22 to bring the years total number of new routes up to 25 along with 4 aid eliminations..

Interest continued at Ebor in the early part of 1982, particularly on the first breakaway where Stephens led ‘Bombay Duck’ 20MO (freed a couple of weeks later, at 21, by Lattanzio, who had returned to Armidale to live), and Colyvan led ‘Pretty Vacant’ 20, ‘Blitzkrieg Bop’ 19 and the desperate flared crack ‘Power Play’ 23MO (freed by Colyvan shortly afterwards at 23). The 4th Breakaway yielded ‘Domination Quickstep’ 19 by Lattanzio and ‘Transactional Burnout’ 20 by Birchall. Colyvan left Armidale for Sydney early in 1982. However he returned later in the year to do ‘Arsenic and Old Lace’ 24 on the 6th Breakaway, which was New England’s first 24. Interest in Ebor waned as the year went on and a total of only 9 routes and 3 aid eliminations were recorded during 1982.

1983 marked the beginning of New England climbers interest in bolt protected walls and slabs and consequently they have been pretty lean years at Ebor since then. During 1983 Colyvan returned to do ‘Blue Murder’ 21 on the Second Breakaway while Stephens led ‘Solid Gold’ 20MO, the first route on Solid Gold Buttress (freed later that same day by Colyvan at 20).

Later in the year Solid Gold Buttress was the scene of a rather unfortunate accident and rescue involving Brian Birchall, a 30 ft ground fall, a variety of popped runners and an unfinished new route. 1983 also saw Mark Colyvan lead the classic ‘It’s My Party’ 22 on the Third Breakaway on yet another of his semi-_regular visits, and Paul Bayne leave Armidale. During 1983 there were 8 new routes along with one aid elimination to bring Ebor’s total number of routes at the end of 1983 up to 137. 1984 sees the return of Richard Curtis to live in Armidale and he frees his old route ‘Prime Cut’ at 20 (which no-one knew had any aid in it, it just so happens that the couple of ascents it had also found it necessary to rest on the rope!) and added ‘Little Wonder’ 18 to the First Breakaway. He also took visitor Kevin Lindorff here so he could do the arête ‘Chocolate Barbarian’ 23, which was the first bolt protected face climb here, although poorly bolted, since the bolt spoils another naturally protected route.

1984 yielded a total of 4 new routes and one aid elimination; In 1985 Stephens does the classic bolt protected face route ‘Sucking Faces’ 20 on the first breakaway.

Curtis and Animal (Paul Colyvan) visited the other side of the gorge and did ‘Snatch and Grab’ 18 (led Curtis) and ‘Grab the Snatch’ 21 (led Animal) on Bondage Buttress. They were the only 3 new routes done in 1985.

1986 saw a couple of aid eliminations of interest with Lattanzio freeing ‘Supermouse’ at 22 and Stephens freeing all but the start of ‘Sundown’ now 20M.

Larry Dixon from Dorrigo began developing Pub Buttress on the other side of the gorge with ‘Damp Monkeys’ 18 being the first route, and probably the best to date. A total of 5 new routes and 2 aid eliminations for the year.

The only activity in 1987 has been Larry Dixon and Al Stephens continuing development of Pub Buttress and bolting some of the arêtes on the second breakaway such as ‘Modern Electrics’ 17 (by Dixon) and ‘Ilean’ 20 (by Stephens), making use of their new power drill. A total of 13 new routes were done in 1987 to bring the total number of routes recorded at Ebor at the end of 1987 to 162 with grade 3 being the easiest and grade 24 being the hardest.

I am tempted to say that the future at Ebor looks fairly bleak however stranger things have happened than crack climbing returning to favour and if recent developments with power drills and aretes continue, Ebor may yet be dragged into the modern era of face climbing. We’ll just have to wait and see.

Mark Colyvan 1 Jan 1988 1988, the Bi-Centennial year, produced four more crack-lines, the best being ‘Tough Customer’ 21 by Jack Lattanzio and Mark Colyvan. Two bolt-protected routes were also established; Tadpole’s ‘It Pays To Belong’ 20 ,and the very beautiful ‘Dream Of The Devil’ by Mark Colyvan. This climb being the first to have fixed hangers at Ebor.

In December 1989 the summer heat melted something in Al Stephens’ brain causing him, with Mark Colyvan, to bolt up ‘Dead Calm’ 22 at the 1st Breakaway . The Nymboida was very low that summer so Larry Dixon and a group of Rafting Guides visited Ebor and did ‘Old Punks and Young Hippies’ 16 on the 2nd breakaway.

1990 saw only two climbs established, both on the 2nd breakaway and both using bolts; ‘Rage’ 21 by Stephens, Gavin Dean and Anita Gordon, and ‘Steel Magnolias’ 24 , equal to the hardest grade at Ebor so far, by Mark Colyvan, Dean and Stephens.

There were no new routes at Ebor during 1991, 1992, and 1993. Many repeats were done during this time at both the First and Second Breakaways, with occasional visits to the Fourth.

Three routes were completed in 1994. At the First Breakaway Brian Cork led Scott Cleland up ‘Biscuit’ 12, and Cleland led Stephens up ‘Nought’ 18.

At the Second Breakaway Gordon Low led Al Stephens, Brian Cork and Toby Waters up ‘Sex and Intrigue’ 20.

1995 saw a new climbing style developing at Ebor, “Shimmying up a fridge”. Gordon Low used this style at the 2nd Breakaway to complete ‘New Blue Dress’ 24, equal to Ebor’s hardest.

In 1996 Gordon Low with Ben Christian, again perfected this technique by leading Ebor’s hardest climb to date, ‘The Proverbial’ 26, at the Third Breakaway.

What’s next? There are many more arêtes to be “shimmied” but they will all be very hard. If you can perfect the technique it will be worth the effort.

Al Stephens 27 Aug 1996

In 98 James Langston with Al Stephens added Funky Monkey.

Either not much happened after this or a lot of history has been lost.

In 2006 the NPWS wanted to ban climbing here but in consultation with the UNEMC future climbing here is secure. In 2007 Liam Jackson and Todd Free added some bolts around the lookout as part of this agreement.

1.1.1. First Breakaway 44 routes in Cliff

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 152.342855, -30.402844

Descent Notes:©

The climbs from 'Dead Calm' to 'Pylarox' finish under the lookout. NPWS have requested that climbers do not use the lookout for anchoring to - bolt anchors have been placed where necessary. Please use them!

1.1.2. Second Breakaway 48 routes in Cliff

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 152.341003, -30.403586

Approach:

Access via a shallow gully l00m left (facing out into gorge) of the upper falls car park. Walk beneath the broken cliff for about 50m until the first recorded routes. Climbs described from left to right.

1.1.3. Third Breakaway 20 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Trad

Long/Lat: 152.339730, -30.403847

Approach:

Half-way between the two lookouts is a large shallow gully, close to the road. Walk down trending towards the top falls. The cliffs are easily seen. The climbs start past a water soak and manky area. Climbs are described right to left.

1.1.4. Fourth Breakaway 31 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Trad
Approach:

From the second car park, take the path down to the valley lookout then follow the cliff top left over the creek, past a barbwire fence and along until you find a large break in the cliffs. The Fourth Breakaway is down then back towards the lookout. Climbs are from right to left.

1.1.5. Solid Gold Buttress 3 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Trad
Approach:

Below the left-hand end of the fourth breakaway is another little buttress, this is Solid Gold Buttress. It is reached by walking down, from the left-hand end of the fourth breakaway near ‘Mongrel’. Climbs are described left to right.

1.1.6. Dead Heroes Buttress 10 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Trad
Approach:

This very short little cliff lies between the Fourth Breakaway and the Fifth Breakaway, and a little higher up in the gorge than those two cliffs. Climbs are described left to right.

1.1.7. Fifth Breakaway 5 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Trad
Approach:

Has the same access as the fourth breakaway, except the cliffs are on the other side of the descent gully, past Dead Heroes Buttress (ie further away from the lookout). Climbs are described left to right.

1.1.8. Sixth Breakaway 6 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Trad
Approach:

Same direction as the fifth breakaway, but still further from the lookout (10-15 min walk from car). Climbs are described left to right.

1.1.9. Pub Buttress 11 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Trad

Long/Lat: 152.342500, -30.401650

Approach:

This cliff is located on the other side of the gorge from all the previously mentioned cliffs. Park at the first car park (as for access to first breakaway), then walk around to the top of the first falls, cross the river and walk up onto the paddock, then along the top for about 50m. Step over the fence and scramble down past an old bottle dump. The cliff is just around the next corner. It is generally 6-l0m in height. Climbs are described from right to left.

1.1.10. Bondage Buttress 3 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Trad
Approach:

This cliff is hard to find. It is located directly beneath Pub Buttress. It is reached by walking diagonally left from the bottom of Pub Buttress (right-hand end) until the top of another cliff is reached. Walk left until a descent can be made down an easy gully. Walk back right beneath unclimbed lines until cleaner rock appears. Good luck. Climbs described left to right.

1.2. Gara Gorge 612 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad, Boulder and other styles

Long/Lat: 151.821961, -30.625204

Description:

All the cliffs on the Gara gorge 15 minutes from Armidale.

1.2.1. Upper Gara Gorge 331 routes in Crag

Summary:
Boulder, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 151.804256, -30.601294

Unique Features And Strengths:

Granite!

Description:

This guide covers the climbing areas in the Upper Gara Gorge. Gara Gorge is part of the Oxley Wild Rivers National Park. All the cliffs (apart from the Ring-pull Boulder) are in the National park as is the access to these areas and should thus be treated accordingly. Enough said!

The Gara Boulders, with their easy access and proximity to Armidale have long been a popular venue for a quick afternoon sortie or a lazy day’s climbing. There is a large variety of routes with everything from straight up jamb-cracks to clip-up sport-routes. Most lines are short (8-15m) and have easy walk-offs or a rap-station nearby. A light rack plus a few brackets should see you through just about everything. The other areas described in this guide are located further down the gorge and are suited more to at least a half-day effort. Climbing at the Kitchen is similar to The Gara Boulders while the Sea Cliff is entirely Sport climbing and the Bastille and the Fortress are slightly more serious with a mixture of styles and routes between 25 and 100m in length.

So there you go, you want, we got - there’s really something for everybody. If after looking at all the climbs you feel like something else, then there are enough boulder problems to send you mad for weeks. Friction slabs, sharp little crimp-fests, cheese-grating slopers and even big, friendly, overhanging jug-hauls.

What more can I say: “Ring now, but don’t send any money!”

Access Issues:

Gara Gorge is located 16km south-east of Armidale’s CBD. To get there, take the Grafton road east out of Armidale then turn right onto Castle Doyle road (just after the 100km speed limit signs) This road goes onto Blue Hole road, turning to dirt straight after the cattle grid, takes you to the Oxley Wild Rivers National Park. Once at the river follow the road right until it comes to a turning circle/parking area at the beginning of the walking track. This is the focus of most of the bouldering in the area. Access to the second car park referred to in the rest of the guide has been blocked to vehicles. To get there walk up onto the ridge and follow the old car track along until it stops. This is the old ‘Car Park’. From the old car park there are several ways of getting into the gorge. Either follow the well defined track which leads east along the ridge to drop down to the Roadblock area and the Mad Woman’s Breakfast boulder, or veer left (north) from this track at its start and walk straight down towards the Hope Buttress region. To get to the Thick As Thieves / Private Sector area, scramble up past the upstream end of Hope Buttress, then head straight across, past a small gully, then on to the main gully, the main water course. Another way to access the Thick as Thieves and Schoolgirl area is to follow the walking track from the first car park until you are above them, and then drop in via the riverbed (about 500m).

Where To Stay:

Camping is frowned upon in the Gara boulders picnic area but the NPWS seem to be amenable to bush camping as long as you adhere to the usual rules about fires etc. Another option is the Pembroke Caravan Park which is just before the turnoff as you leave town on the Grafton road. They offer everything from basic tent-sites to fully furnished cabins. There is also an amazing variety of hotels, bed n’ breakfast and pub accommodation in town. For your food needs there is a choice of three large supermarkets as well as a multitude of fruit shops and heath food stores. If you feel like catching a feed in town, there are plenty of restaurants, cafes and pubs, the New England Hotel has a great brassiere that serves good food in a nice atmosphere and is the watering hole for most of the local climbers - just look for the scruffy mob waving their arms around in the air. All your climbing needs as well as the latest information on routes and access are available from Armidale Outdoors.

Ethic:

Basically, the climbers of Armidale are a pretty laid back, free thinking group and as long as you don’t go out of your way to put people’s noses out of joint you’ll be amazed at how helpful they can be. The quickest way to piss people off is by ripping off projects. There are a few devoted locals making an effort and putting up quality new climbs. A lot of time, hard work and even money goes into their endeavours (cracks can be projects too) and there is too much unclimbed rock around to justify destroying someone else’s motivation. Any routes marked as such or not in the guide should be left alone. The simple courtesy of asking first may save you from being stripped naked and being staked out for the crows to pick your eyes out. If putting up new routes is your thing then please feel free. The only request is that you avoid placing hangers or conspicuous bolts around the Gara Boulders as we are already viewed as an environmental menace by the NPWS - bolting in National Parks is actually illegal.

History:©

Ironically, the Garra boulders area was discovered by accident by Rob Dixon and Brian Birchall whilst returning from a day at Nettle Buttress. The year was 1975. On this day they completed “Hope” (16) and “Charity” (14). Development continued through the following years with one of the best being the classic easy route “Illusion” (13).

1978 saw the arrival of the infamous Joe Friend in Armidale. Foregoing the short routes of the Boulders he went further down the gorge to the Bastille, unearthing it’s first route “Geronimo” (20) though a rumoured wooden peg found on the first ascent may point to the possibility that Friend may have been beaten to the cherry. Friend went on to do more routes over the river at the Fortress such as the frightening off-width “The Chop” (18).

1980 was the first real route-finding rush of the area. Inspired by Birchall’s “Savage Amusement” (20) (now 22 since the large spike was inadvertently removed) Mark Colyvan and John Latanzio climbed “Inertia” (22) and “Anticipation” (18) respectively. 1981, and the pace was kept up by Colyvan’s superb “Psychosomatic” (23) arguably one of the best routes in the area if you have the bottle for the first few moves. The same year saw the first sport-route (not recognised as such at the time) with Al Stephens’ ever-popular “Heavy Metal” (18).

1982 and the year of greatest productivity with over 20 new climbs developed in the area. This was also the year of one of the greatest controversies in the local scene. Frustrated with waiting for Ed Sharpe to break free from his alleged weekend hangovers and finish his project at the Private Sector, Paul Bayne finally went out and rope-soloed the first ascent of “Never-Ready Eddie”. Tempered by everyone’s plea’s (no-one wanted to find Paul’s body at the dump) Paul eventually called the route “Slackers and Robbers” (22) Also in this area was Latanzio’s Trajectory (18) which met an unpleasant demise when the bottom half fell down the slab. It has since been resurrected by Gordon Low. Straightened out with a couple of new bolts it has become a testy little 22. Other notable routes of this year were Colyvan’s “Private Sector” (22) and the classic overhanging crack “Thick as Thieves” (21). The same year saw a renewal of interest downstream where a direct finish was added to Geronimo (at the Bastille) compliments of Colyvan and Stephens. Across the river at the Fortress Bayne made significant inroads into freeing the classic double roof “Kiss Me Deadly” (22M1).

The next few years were a bit of a veritable new route drought with interest being focused in other areas. Two exceptions were Colyvan’s scary Don’t Get Cute” and Geof Robertson’s ascent of “The Hot Pearl Snatch” (26). Present on the day Stephens seemed more chuffed at the fact that Colyvan had been beaten to the ascent rather than the fact that New England now had it’s very own 26, even if it was less than ten metres long.

1988, the bicentennial year, brought a small stir with Brendan Halliburton producing 5 new routes, all in the area of the Swimming Hole. Most have since been lost in the mists of time but one standout is the excellent, exciting traverse “Careful He Might Hear You” (17). Before leaving town he also bolted a line left of “Don’t Get Cute” but the first ascent of “Leaving on Your Mind” (21) was left to the opportunistic Colyvan to clean up the following year. 1989 must have been the year for cleaning up as Stephens was also on detail. When Graeme Stewart was kidnapped by his wife and unable to return and free the last bit of aid from “Picnic at Hanging Rock” (25) Stephens was the first in to snaffle it up.

The following years brought a lull in activity though some interest was shown in the Bastille. Several routes were put up. Of these, “Innocence” (18), courtesy of Stephens, is probably the best easy slab this side of the divide.

The summer of 93-94 could be seen as a reemergence of the Boulders to the centre of attention. Too hot to climb anywhere else, Stephens and local boy Ben Christian focused on a few short tricks at the private sector. The pair managed to successfully pull a few rabbits out of their sleeves with Stephens’ “Yoda” (24) (just as popular as it is short!) and Christian’s exciting “Ninja” (22) being the picks of the litter. Shortly later Christian came down with severe tendonitis and everybody else’s attentions were elsewhere.

1995 started off with a bang with Christian letting everyone know he was back by quickly dispatching his old project “Black Dog” (25). The following day Gordon Low had finally lost enough weight to drag his sorry arse up “Sweet Surrender” (24), ending his two-year affair with the line.

Later that season Christian cleaned up an abandoned project next to “Sweet Surrender” on the “Shooting Star Buttress” to produce the frightening “Rodney’s Garibaldi Metwurst” (26-and quite a poisonous mouthful!). Finally heeding the plaintive bleating of would-be suitors, too scared to do the route without dangling slings all over it, Christian has since re-bolted “The Metwurst” to make it a little more consumer-friendly.

Downstream, between the Bastille and the Fortress, Low began development at “The Kitchen”, which is at water level, with several others in tow. The best routes so far are the easy classic “Get Nuked” (15) done by visiting Brisbanite Bill Briner, though it has been recently pointed out that Paul Bayne actually soloed the first ascent 10 years ago, and Low’s more recent “Lean Cuisine” (23).

Winter 1995 saw the arrival of The Swiss route-machine Andreas Audetat.

With his strong fingers and European sportclimbing tactics Audetat was the one to drag New England, kicking and screaming, into the new age during 95 and ‘96. Though most of his efforts were focused further down the gorge, Audetat did do many high-calibre routes around the Boulders and further downstream. Below the Fortress, Audetat teamed up with Low and Tim Hill to Develop The Sea Cliff. Best routes here are Hill’s “Se A Cabo” (26) and Audetat’s extremely powerful “Ravage” (29). Up on the Bastille Audetat bolted and quickly completed (in two days) the striking yellow streak on the main face to give a product with “No Frills” (29). At the Fortress Low and Stephens continued to unearth the goodies through the early months of ‘97 with the hit being Stephens’ “Morning Glory” (22) -”What’s the story?”

At the boulders Audetat managed to fill in nearly all the gaps on the Shooting Star Buttress - the best being “Hitman” (29) as well as grid-bolting a large boulder in the farmer’s property. The “Ring-Pull Boulder” (anonymously named by a stunned local) has almost a dozen skin-ripping classic sport-routes on it but unfortunately a recent change of ownership and the usual litigation fears has closed this area to climbers.

Since the departure of Audetat back to Switzerland and the discovery of new sport climbing areas on the sandstone of the coast, development in the gorge has once again gone into hibernation, with the exception of the occasional route by the regular local crew. One of these was the so-called last great problem on Motor-head Buttress. “Paper, Scissors, Rock (25) finally submitted to a siege tactics onslaught by Matt Rizzuto and Low, with Rizzuto finally claiming the glory of success. But don’t be fooled, there is still a veritable cornucopium of unclimbed rock down there. Stephens is still sniffing out the occasional classic and Low is still making hopeful forays to the Bastille to waste tape on his optimistic project. Rizzuto, as well as tearing his way through the local test-pieces, is gradually notching up a good collection of hard boulder problems in the V5+ range.

So if you ever get fed-up with long approaches and slogging uphill to your favourite crag, remember why we climb in Gara gorge - because it’s not there!

Pay us a visit, there’s plenty rock for everyone.

1.2.2. Western Gara Gorge 190 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

Long/Lat: 151.815071, -30.625937

Unique Features And Strengths:

Slabs and cracks

Description:

All crags that are on the west side.

Access Issues:

Access to Dome Wall or Persian Carpets involves driving through private property to reach the Gara Gorge. Contact must be made with the landowners prior to heading out there:

Mike Coffey (Kenwood Park): 02 6775 3766

Pete and Susanne or Jeff Moore: 02 6775 3727

It is important to let the Coffeys know you’re coming (as access is very close to their house), and ask the Moores for permission to cross their land (providing the most efficient access to Dome Wall or Persian Carpets).

Good relations with these landowners are essential for New England climbers, and all visitors in the future, to access these excellent crags, so please treat them with respect. Leave all gates as you find them, cross fences at the strongest strainer post, etc etc. Access is likely to be refused if tenants are in the Moores’ ‘holiday’ house, so please be patient or better still ask about staying there yourself.

This is a link to a file you can use in Google Earth to see a map to The Dome Wall Parking area:

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/24251869/Dome%20Wall%20Etc%20Access.kmz

Where To Stay:

Aside from the usual places in Armidale, there is a cabin you can rent on the property only a couple minutes walk from the gorge.

1.2.3. Eastern Gara Gorge 88 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 151.827850, -30.624146

Description:

All crags that are on the east side.

1.2.4. Isolated Buttress 3 routes in Area

Summary:
All Unknown

1.3. Stonehenge 71 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 151.742422, -29.840773

Description:

Stonehenge is a great bouldering spot with 60+ routes on some great shaped rocks. The rock is typical New England granite with lots of crimps, flakes and great friction. And where else can you park right next to the problem you're working?

Even though stonehenge has seen active bouldering for some time a lot of history isn't recorded so any feedback on history, routes, names and grades would be greatly appreciated!

Stonehenge is about an hours drive north of Armidale and about 5 minutes south of Glen Innes. It is 700 hundred meters north of 'Balancing Rock' which is sign posted.

The area is a recreation area complete with picnic area, barbecues, footy pitch, washrooms, water and a rifle range.

1.3.1. North-East cluster 23 routes in Sector

Summary:

Long/Lat: 151.744197, -29.839514

Description:

Drive in past the buildings, after the water tank turn left and drive until there is no more rock.

1.3.2. Central Cluster 10 routes in Area

Summary:

Long/Lat: 151.741798, -29.841409

Description:

Drive into the recreation area past the picnic area and continue straight when the gravel stops. Follow worn dual track straight ahead until you see the concrete water tank ahead on your left. You are now in the Central cluster, boulders are south and north of the track.

1.3.3. South-West cluster 18 routes in Sector

Summary:

Long/Lat: 151.741198, -29.842433

Description:

After the building turn right and drive carefully straight south

1.3.4. South East Cluster 20 routes in Area

Summary:

Long/Lat: 151.742173, -29.842608

Description:

Drive in to the recreation area and past the picnic area and follow road to the right. When the gravel runs out drive slowly through the grass to the south east. Most obvious boulder is the large boulder that is split in half.

1.4. Dangars Gorge 23 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 151.726576, -30.675762

1.4.1. Dangars Falls 12 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Trad

Long/Lat: 151.727379, -30.676110

Unique Features And Strengths:

Like climbing inside a giant mixing bowl.

Description:

Warning: - Don’t climb at Dangars Falls if the rock is wet or if it looks like rain. The rock is very slippery when wet.

  • S.L.C.D.’s don’t work very well on this rock type - they slip with alarming ease. Hexes and wires are needed here.
  • Helmets are recommended. This is a tourist area and tourists throw stones.

Some climbs may not be able to be attempted depending on how much water is coming over the falls. Be sensible.

Approach:

Follow the signposts from various points around Armidale to Kennedy St. and out onto Dangarsleigh Rd. Continue along this road till you come to the War Memorial. Either turn left here, or continue along Dangarsleigh Rd. to a turn-off further along. Park in the car-park. The access walking track is located down the gully near the car park. This track zig-zags to the bottom of the gorge. Near the bottom the track gets very steep.

Where To Stay:

There is a National Park Campground at the falls.

History:

1960's

Rock climbing in the Armidale district is believed to have commenced around 1960 at Dangars Falls. Two climbers, John (Action) Lindsay and Hugh Spencer, at that time, climbed the waterfall face right of the water-course. This is of course the climb known today as Action. At the same time it is believed that they also climbed the orange pinnacle right of Action.

Looking for other great challenges, in 1961 Lindsay and party attempted and completed the first ascent of the Wollomombi-Chandler Ridge. Obviously other members of the Mountaineering Club thought they were a little crazy, as none of these climbs were recorded. No doubt Lindsay and others attempted/completed other climbs but unfortunately no records were kept.

The first recorded climbs were completed in 1964.

Bob Harden and Doug McLean formed a climbing group called the Delta Club, a breakaway group from the University Of New England Mountaineering Club (UNEMC). Starts of climbs were marked with a Delta instead of the usual square. Some of these markings were still visible at Bakers Creek in the early seventies but have since been worn away. Two climbs were put up in 1964 by Harden and McLean. They are Bakercide (6) and Nitrocide(8), both at Bakers Creek. 1965 saw the Delta club leap into action. John Davis and Mike Thomas joined Harden and McLean.

Apart from climbing at Bakers Creek, the group make excursions to Mihi Falls and Dangars Falls. Five new climbs were put up at Bakers Creek. The best being Davicide(13) by Davis, Punjacide(13) by I.Logan and the two aid climbs, ADP(M1) and ryocide(M1), both by Harden. Three climbs were completed at Mihi- the best being the classic Pull Up(15) by Davis. During the same year they made their first visit onto the big, scary wall of Dangars Falls. Harden put up the very run-out Toecap(13), while Davis climbed Goldfinger(16), a climb that hasn’t, at the time of writing this guide, had a second ascent !

In 1966 McLean with Dave Mills repeated Lindsay’s route, giving it the name Action (14), while the best route at Bakers Creek was Normacide (11) by Mills.

1967 produced only two new ones at Bakers Creek. Hardicide (14) by Thomas and the tricky Speleocide (12) by B.Douglas.

The only new route in 1968 was at Dangars, Nightcap (12) by Thomas.

Mills pioneered two new ones at Bakers Creek in 1969. The best being Klettercide (12). Noel Beynon with J.Street had a close look at the rock around Wollomombi Falls. They found and climbed Dono Dedit (8) During this year the Wollomombi-Chandler Ridge became a popular trip. Elaine Cantrill (Elaine’s Gorge-a canyon- is named after her) arrived on the scene, and swinging leads with R.Jones, put up the long Magnificent Obsession (9) on Oaky Falls. The same pair did the first route at Four Mile Creek Falls, Skylite (6).

1970's

The only new route in 1970 was Drednought (14) at Dangars Falls by N.Hughes and Beynon. This takes the corner right of Action and left of the Orange Pillar. Today it is quite loose and probably was then.

1971 produced eight climbs. Five at Bakers Creek- the best being Pissed Psychedelic Peanut (15) by A.Suters and Cornelius Corners (15) by Rob Dixon. Hughes and Beynon found the chossiest route in New England at Wollomombi Falls. It goes up a slabby wall onto the Wollomombi-Chandler Ridge, opposite the falls. It is appropriately titled Violet Crumble Bar (13). J.Street with Dick Gallimore did We Are Not Amused(12), the chimney next to the falls at Four Mile Creek Falls, while R.Jones with Gallimore did Nuttinge (14) at the same crag.

1974 saw Phil Prior arrive, and with Jill Kelman put up a direct start to Nightcap, which they named Copperhead (12). Rob Dixon dragged Bob Killip and Brian Birchall to Mihi to do Deception(14). Prior, at Bakers Creek, disappeared into the mank just downstream of Bakers Creek Falls, to produce Frigid Air (6).

In 1975, Al Stephens with Dixon added the first four pitches to We Are Not Amused (12) at Four Mile Creek Falls. At the same location Killip with Rob Stazewski completed The Killip-Stazewski Route On The East Face Of Four Mile (20). At Mihi Dixon, with Stephens, did Bird On A Wire (16). In 1978, a granite cliff,Flaky Buttress, downstream from Dangars, was discovered by Bob Killip. The result was Plain Sailing (14).

1980's

Dangars received two new ones in 1980. Stephens with Geoff Francis did the multi-pitch Slippery When Wet (13) during a drought, while on the opposite wall Birchall with Francis did Caprice (17). At Bakers Creek Austin Legler with Greg (Dulux) Pritchard did Basilisk (16). Back at Flaky Buttress (Dangars) Jack Lattanzio, with Ed Sharp, warmed up on Fairy Choss (8), and later that year returned with Mark Colyvan to complete Mystery Achievement (20).

1981 saw Dangars Falls yield Total Control (20) by Bayne and Colyvan, as well as Foolscap (18) by Birchall. Downstream, past Flaky Buttress Stephens and Rob Clark found The Richard Cliff and put up three great climbs, the best being Eavesdropper (19) by Stephens and Airs and Graces (19) by Clark. Stephens with Sharp had a Calculated Thrill (16) at Mihi after he did White Man’s Burden (20) with Clark at Bakers Creek. Near The Richard Cliff Pritchard found The Pritchard Cliff and soloed the only route to date, Pariah (5).

In 1982 Paul Bayne found another crag, Dynomight Buttress, near (before ?) Flaky Buttress. No one has been able to locate it since. At Flaky Buttress Stephens put up the great Bombora (20 M1). Bayne managed to eliminated most of the aid but left the grade the same. On Richard Cliff, the next crag down the gorge, Bayne with Stephens, did the powerful Lackluster Backbuster (23).

In 1985, Stephens made a brief visit to Bakers Ck. to establish Cheesy Gland (20), a variant finish to Cornelius Corners.

At Bakers Ck. in 1986 Stephens with Larry Dixon eliminated all aid on ADP, now 21.

1990's

No new routes were put up on or around any of the falls from 1986 until the drought of 1993 when Wollomombi Falls were completely dry! Ben Christian and Stephens did After the Rain (18). The drought continued in 1994 and once again Wollomombi Falls dried up. This time Gordon Low and Stephens with Tim Hill completed a line parallel to After the Rain, called God’s Of Thunder (18).

Most of this guide and the history was documented in 'Waterfalls-A Rock climbers guide to the waterfalls of New England' by Al Stephens (1996)

1.4.2. Dynomight Buttress 2 routes in Area

Summary:
All Trad
Description:

Along the northern rim of the gorge are several granite crags. These can be seen from the various lookouts. The first one you will approach as you proceed along the gorge is Dynomight Buttress. No one has been able to find it since then so if you do let me know.

Approach:

Eastward, along the north rim of the gorge to the first granite outcrop approx. 200m. past a large gully, descend a minor gully (marked with two pieces of tape on fence) about 20m. then traverse east below upper tier. There are three obvious lines. Two have been completed.

1.4.3. Flaky Buttress 5 routes in Area

Summary:
Trad and Aid

1.4.4. Pritchard Cliff 1 route in Area

Summary:
All Trad

1.4.5. Richard Cliff 3 routes in Area

Summary:
All Trad

1.5. Mt Yarrowyck 177 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Boulder

Long/Lat: 151.372529, -30.464257

Unique Features And Strengths:

Mt Yarrowyck is granite bouldering and climbing. There is a lot of climbing that has been done and still more to be discovered. The boulders range from 2m to 15m high and the roped climbing is up to 2 pitches long.

Description:

The Mt Yarrowyck Nature Reserve west of Armidale is best known for it’s Aboriginal rock art and it’s isolation. However this area also offers some superb bouldering on exceptionally high quality granite. The boulder fields are extensive and the environment and landings usually friendly. The rock is featured with unusual crystalline pockets, heinous slopers and the arch-typical granite crimper. These combine to offer problems ranging from V0 slabs to steep pocketed test-pieces. The best time to climb is from March through to November. Winter days can be cold with single digit temperatures not unusual whilst pleasant summer mornings can give way to scorching midday sun. The area is serviced by the NPWS who maintain a toilet and some BBQs but drinking water is not available so be warned, particularly if you intend to visit in the summer months.

Jeff Gracie.

Access Issues:

95% of the climbing at Yarrowyck is located on private property, but the land owner is a climber and has granted access to all climbers anytime. Please do not leave garbage around, leave gates as you find them and do not harass stock. Climbing at Yarrowyck is a privilege, not a right.

The other 5% is located on National Park land along the trail to the Aboriginal Rock Art site.

Approach:

Yarrowyck is about 30 minutes west of Armidale.

From Armidale take the Bundarra Rd past Mitre Ten and the Sale yards for about 30 minutes.

When you get to the T-intersection at Thunderbolts Way, turn right and after about 1km turn right into the car park of the Mt Yarrowyck Reserve.

History:

It wasn’t until 1975 that the potential of the boulder fields at Yarrowyck was realized. Although the crags higher up the hill had long been a focus of local attention, the numerous problems on the low lying boulders had gone largely unnoticed. Development following the initial reconnaissance's yielded a number of area classics including Killop's Killer , Burchill's Bomber, Latanzio's Lurch and Bayne's Claim To Fame. The main protagonists at this time being Bob Killop, John Latanzio, Brian Burchill, and Paul Bayne. Unlike other bouldering areas at that time the problems at Yarrowyck focused mostly on boldness rather than technical difficulty.

By the mid 80s the focus of the Armidale climbing scene had again returned to roped climbing with the popularity of the ‘practice boulders’ all but a fond memory. However the bouldering at Mt Yarrowyck returned briefly to the limelight in the early 90’s following the arrival of the now infamous Carl Schultz. Although Carl's bouldering passion was seen by some as an oddball activity, he pioneered a number of extremely difficult problems in the Armidale area, many of which are yet to see repeats. It was in 1997 that the Yarrowyck area underwent a full bouldering renaissance after being rediscovered by Armidale locals Ben Christian, Gordon Low, and Jeff Gracie. The new problems all focused on technical difficulty and included the development of the Sharpest Mono Area with it’s classic problems, 'Pocket Fest' (V2), and 'The Sharpest Mono in the World' (V3). Development went into overdrive in early 1999 when the mist finally cleared from Christians’ ‘bouldering goggles’ allowing him to at last realize the true potential of the area (something that Gracie had been telling him for years). The first focus of attention was 'The Trackside Boulder' where 'New Beginning' (V4) and 'Jingoism' (V7) both saw quick ascents.

1.5.1. Car Park Boulders 92 routes in Area

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 151.371808, -30.467960

Description:

From the parking area walk north past toilet and climb the fence and you are in the Car Park boulders.

There is a sign that says private property, but the land owner allows climbing on the property without having to ask permission.

1.5.2. New Age area 4 routes in Area

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 151.371242, -30.466217

Description:

Walk along the track to the rock art site until you come to an old fence (300-400m) running perpendicular to the trail and going uphill.

Follow the fence line up hill for about 150m and you should see a collection of boulders. Most obvious is a 6m high boulder with a nice crack to undercling flake.

1.5.3. Trackside area 20 routes in Sector

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 151.371254, -30.465362

Description:

The area immediately to the north from the car park

1.5.4. Icefields 14 routes in Area

Summary:
All Trad

1.5.5. The Central Bluff 3 routes in Area

Summary:
All Trad

1.5.6. Half Dome 5 routes in Area

Summary:
Trad and Aid

1.5.7. Wall Right of Central Bluff 3 routes in Area

Summary:
All Trad

1.5.8. Wall Below Cetral Bluff 1 route in Area

Summary:
All Trad

1.5.9. The Yarrowyck Boulders 2 routes in Area

Summary:
All Trad

1.5.10. Captain Pugwash Memorial Buttress 1 route in Area

Summary:
All Trad

1.5.11. Lost world 18 routes in Sector

Summary:
Mostly Boulder

Long/Lat: 151.373305, -30.462753

Description:

Home to possibly the hardest granite boulder problem in Australia, 'Gandalf the Grey'.

Approach:

After finding the old track that passes the 'Trackside boulder', keep walking for about 400m gradually gaining height. The lost world is uphill on your right about 50m from the track, over a fence which is so collapsed you might miss it. It can be a little tricky to find the first time, look for a large distinctive fig tree, which is actually growing right through the 'Gandalf cave'.

1.5.12. No mans land 4 routes in Sector

Summary:
All Boulder
Approach:

As you walk along the main track heading north, about 50m past the 'Clean arete boulder' is a little cluster immediately to the right of the track with a handful of problems.

1.5.13. Sharpest Mono area 10 routes in Sector

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 151.374348, -30.460368

Description:

Walk along the NP track for roughly a km. It is the last area before crossing the fence into the Nature reserve (no climbing allow there)

1.5.14. The cave area 0 routes in Area

Description:

Walk about a 1km north into the Nature reserve.

1.6. Moonbi 28 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad and Unknown

Long/Lat: 151.076836, -30.995035

Description:

The Moonbi area (Anteater Buttress and environs) presents many granitic cliff lines, mainly slabby in nature and much of which has now been explored. In the early years most of the interest concentrated on Anteater Buttress and the boulders above due to easy access and obvious quality. The slab routes are some of the best in New England and there have been no hang-ups with anti-bolting ethics here so most of the routes are well protected.

Access Issues:

The town of Moonbi is located about 20km North of Tamworth on the New England Highway, in the heart of chicken country. The access arrangements have changed in recent years and general access is now not allowed. If you want to climb here you must go with Kevin Moore from Tamworth or with the UNEMC from Armidale. In addition you will be required to fill out a special indemnity form, requested by the landowner's insurers available only from Moore and Stephens. Failure to adhere to this procedure will see a total lockout.

History:

The first routes were done in April 1975 by various Armidale climbers. The notable routes from these early visits were the classic 'Snakeskin Flake' 13 by Bob Killip and Phil Prior, the desperate jam crack 'Savage' 19 (now 23 due to a falling block) by Bob Killip and Max Smart, and the bold 'Slabba-Dabba-Do' 17,which was the first slab route to be done,by Robert Stazewski and Bob Killip. The last route was particularly impressive since it was done on sight (ie no brushing or bolting !) and it took many years before it had its second lead. Another route of interest was the popular 'Sorrow' 14 by Phil Prior. A total of eight new routes were put up that year.

Only two new climbs were completed in 1976, 'Laurel And Hardy' 15, above the slabs, by Brian Birchall and, on the Splitters Gully Road Slabs the multi-pitch 'Babylon' 12 by Laimonis Kavelieris, the only climb there to date.

The area continued to see visitors from time to time mainly to repeat 'Snakeskin Flake'. Early 1982 saw the first climbs at Goal Creek Slabs. Ed Sharpe led 'Trundle' 11 and Al Stephens did 'Protection Racket' 14 and 'Up For Grabs' 18. During the same year Kevin Moore completed the first route up high on the ridge at The Brothers, 'Can't Remember Her Name' 12.

However it wasn't until Mark Colyvan and Brian Birchall returned to the area to do the second ascent of 'Slabba-Dabba-Do' in early 1983 that the potential of the slabs was realised. Colyvan bolted and brushed an obvious black slab which he climbed a few months later with Paul Bayne and Paul Colyvan (Animal) to give 'New Romantic' 21 which was an instant classic. This route was Paul's introduction to slab climbing, a style which he grew to love and master very quickly. During the same year Ed Sharpe returned to Goal Creek Slabs to do the powerful 'Scare Tactics' 19. Later in the year, back at the Anteater slabs Al Stephens got into the act by doing 'On the Slack' 18, another route sporting bolts,and Paul Colyvan did 'Slap And Tickle' 17. Paul also did 'Green Spastic Chook' 11, on the boulders above the slabs.

When Paul Colyvan moved to Tamworth the next year, 1884, he did the bold slab left of 'New Romantic' called 'Fashion Conscious' 22 which was the first slab done in the new high friction boots; Fires.

Things were fairly quiet here until August,1986 when the Colyvan brothers returned for a long weekend and camped in a Kootingal motel so that they could eat Chocolate Bavarians and watch the footy at night. They spent most of the three days at the crag brushing and bolting. However they ended up with three great slab routes; 'Slow Fade' 22 by Mark,'Cock and Pullet' 17 by Paul, and 'Head Over Heels' 19 also by Paul!. Later in the year Al Stephens put in two half days bolting to produce yet another good slab in 'Buck Buck Bacaw' 21.

1987 produced only two new routes, 'Bantam' 17 by Larry Dixon, and 'Finger Lickin Chicken' by Stephens, both on the boulders above the slabs.

1988 was another quiet year with two shady climbs on the boulders above the slabs, 'Shady Bridge' by Gary Phillips and 'Shady Tactics' by Kevin Moore. Later that year Kevin Moore with Bob Murison began exploration of the Kootingal Tip. They found 'Scanties on the Chockstone' 14, by Bob, and Petticoat Corner' 14 by Kevin.

The next two years were boom years for Moonbi. During 1989 21 new climbs were recorded. Seven were completed at the Lookout Crag (now totally closed), the best being the classics 'Confidence Limits' 16 and 'Interative Process' 17 both by Kevin Moore. Eight new routes were conceived on the boulders below the slabs. The best being Larry Dixon's 'Faith No More' 21 and the classic 'Beak Job' 19, and Mark Colyvan's 'The Fosbury Flop' 21. A quick weekend visit by the infamous crag developer Andrew Penny with Carl-Joan Jagusch resulted in two new routes, the best being the very popular 'Henny Penny' 18 by Penny. Later that year Mark Colyvan with Jo Monaghan slogged their way up to the slabs on the Left side of Moonbi Gap and completed the very long, but easy access route 'Walking Back To Happiness' 4, as well as 'Promise' 16, a two pitch slab.

New route fever continued into 1990. Twenty-two new routes! John Wilde put up the last route on the slabs to date,the very bold 'Head Over Heels-Direct Finish' 24. Attention then moved to the Lookout crag. Eight new routes were completed, mostly by Newcastle climbers. The best being 'Sebastian's' Maximum Likelihood' 25 by Paul Reviere, 'Zoro Direct' 21 by George Fieg, 'Call Me Al' 24 by John Wilde and 'The Great Leap Forward' 19 by Al Stephens. During one of his visits, Newcastle climber John Wilde accidentally stole Paul Colyvan's bolt prepared route at The Fosbury Flop Boulder, 'Death Warrant' 23. Around the same time Kevin Moore completed 'Pluckin' Feathers' 21 on the boulders above the slabs. The other area of huge development was the boulders below the slabs. Seven new climbs were put up, the best being 'The Caponiser' 17 by Kevin Moore, 'Cock-A-Hoop' 22 and 'Kentucky Fried Rodent' 21 by Gavin Dean, all at Pecker Wall. Later that year interest turned to the two new areas up on the ridge. Kevin Moore led a tramline of climbers up the classic 'Boys Day Out' 15 at The Brothers, then moved on to The Minefield to do 'Hybrid Vigour' 20. With him was John Wilde who, at the same crag, completed the very technical 'Dambuster' 24.

In 1991 everyone calmed down. Kevin's son Anthony Moore led 'Play School' 7, his first lead. Al Stephens made the long trek to Moonbi Gap-Left Side to complete 'Perfect Skin' 15. Then during December when it was too hot to do any long lines, Kevin Moore ticked of three more at Kootingal Tip, 'No Refuse'15, Wasted Time' 9 and 'Laughing Litter' 10.

In 1992 Al Stephens finally cracked his long term project at Pecker Wall, 'Chicken Vindaloo' 25. Kevin Moore, Dave Worthington and Jim Morgan found another five climbs at Kootingal Tip, the best being Kevin's 'Scalpel' 19 and Jim's 'Dynamic Lifter' 21.

The Kootingal Tip produced one more climb in April 1993,'XPT' 20 by Kevin Moore. In October the same year Stuart Whitten launched a small expedition to Moonbi Gap-Right Side (the North side) and completed 'Up The Garden Path' 5, 'Sly Street' 12 and 'Shoulder Boulder' 16.

If you want to do new climbs, there's always lines between the lines. But if you don't, there are masses of great climbs to repeat. Anyone want to go to Moonbi next weekend ? Al Stephens........September 199

1.6.1. Anteater Buttress 16 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Trad

Long/Lat: 151.076613, -30.996171

Description:

This is the obvious large slabby buttress seen up high as you drive in and was the original Moonbi crag. Descent is made via the gully at the far right of the cliff or by a 50m abseil from the chain atop of 'New Romantic' to the blocks between 'New Romantic' and ',Slabba-Dabba-Do' i.e. when abseiling take a slightly diagonal line to your right.

The routes are described from left to right.

1.6.2. Upper Boulders 7 routes in Area

Summary:
All Unknown

1.6.3. Goal Creek Slabs 4 routes in Area

Summary:
All Unknown
Description:

Access has been denied to The Goal Creek Slabs at the time of writing this guide. It is apparently on private property and the owners refuse to allow climbers to go there. For the sake of history and the possibility that one day the cliff may be open, I've included the routes in this guide. From Anteater Buttress the slabs are clearly visible from the road up on your right. There are many potential new slab routes in this area.

1.6.4. Splitters Gully Road Slabs 1 route in Area

Summary:
All Unknown
Description:

Follow the 'Splitters Gully' road (bitumen), off the New England Gully Road for about 4-5 km, there is a large cliff on the right high up on the hill, just West of 'Lighthouse Hill'. Walk up the hill (horrendous) to the cliff.

1.7. Bakers Creek 44 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad and Boulder

Long/Lat: 151.891919, -30.542745

Unique Features And Strengths:

A strange mix of old-school trad routes on the walls around the falls and modern bouldering in the creek bed. Fine grained granite, large boulders

Description:

Deep gorge not far from Armidale, off Waterfall Way. Old neglected trad climbs with bouldering at their base. Perhaps 20 boulder problems established so far, with scope for more, and potential for bolted and naturally protected climbs as well. Access is steep and difficult, straight off the lookout.

Access Issues:

From Armidale head east on the waterfall way for 20kms, then right at the sign post, onto dirt for a couple kms.

Approach:

From the lookout, jump the fence on the right and follow a faint track down to the right. Caution must be taken walking in as the decent is very steep. As you approach there is a promising looking boulder that you soon realize is the size of a house. Most established boulder problems are downstream of this (problem 'High times and down beats' is upstream of the giant block and 'One too many' sits against it), but future problems exist right through the gorge from the waterfall downstream.

History:

Bob Harden and Doug McLean formed a climbing group called the Delta Club, a breakaway group from the University Of New England Mountaineering Club (UNEMC). Starts of climbs were marked with a Delta instead of the usual square. Some of these markings were still visible at Bakers Creek in the early seventies but have since been worn away. Two climbs were put up in 1964 by Harden and McLean. They are Bakercide (6) and Nitrocide(8).1967 produced only two new ones, Hardicide (14) by Thomas and the tricky Speleocide (12) by B.Douglas. Mills pioneered two new ones in 1969, the best being Klettercide (12). 1971 produced five, the best being Pissed Psychedelic Peanut (15) by A.Suters and Cornelius Corners (15) by Rob Dixon. In 1980, Austin Legler with Greg (Dulux) Pritchard did Basilisk (16). 1981 saw Al Stephens climb White Man’s Burden (20) with Clark and in 1985, Stephens made another brief visit to establish Cheesy Gland (20), a variant finish to Cornelius Corners. In 1986 Stephens with Larry Dixon eliminated all aid on ADP, now 21.

This history was documented in 'Waterfalls-A Rock climbers guide to the waterfalls of New England' by Al Stephens (1996).

After years of neglect, the area received a second wind after Artie Schultz heard from Rick Curtis that a few trad lines had been done there but no record of them existed (oh yes they did and now they are in this guide...). The new generation was after quality bouldering and it seems they found some.

1.8. Bluff Rock 1 route in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 151.998922, -29.167188

1.9. Cathedral Rocks 57 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Boulder

Long/Lat: 152.231903, -30.439685

Approach:

From Armidale take the Grafton/Dorrigo Road for approx. 79km to the turn-off to the park. Follow the dirt road for 7km. to the Barokee Rest Area. Park here then follow the walking track for approx. 2km. to the walls of Cathedral Rock. All climbs, except 'Morlock', are on the sunny 'North side'.

The best time to climb here is autumn, late spring or on a still, sunny winter’s day. Take out all your rubbish and no fires please.

History:

Due to the popularity of other crags in the Armidale/New England area, Cathedral Rock hasn’t produced many new routes since its discovery as a climbing area in 1979. The history of this crag spans only two years. In the first of those two years, 1979, access to the cliff was more reminiscent of a minor bush-walk. For the second part of this history, 1984, access was greatly improved with a picnic/camping area and a pleasant track leading to the crag.

In 1979 Ed Sharp convinced Al Stephens that there was a huge amount of rock to climb at Cathedral Rock. In those days there was a locked gate at the aqueduct. Bushwalkers parked here and walked several kilometres down the road, then cross-country to the rock. Ed and Al, being very cunning, phoned the D.C.A.(who administer the Radar on Round Mountain) and convinced them to leave the gate open for them. They drove to the bottom of the hill (the site of the current gate) then walked across to the rock. After some exploring they found and completed 'Morlock' (14), a climb that goes from one side of the rock to the other. They realised the great potential of the place but didn’t return until several years later.

1984 was quite a huge year for Cathedral Rock. Stephens convinced Larry Dixon of the possibility of new routes waiting in the warm winter sun. Stephens led 'Soft Touch' (17), in May and they returned in June for Dixon to lead 'Day Dream' (12), while Stephens did the big chimney 'We Won’t Get Fooled Again' (16). Stephens returned the same month with Richard Curtis to put up two climbs on the isolated pillar to the left of the walk-in track. Curtis glided up 'Tontons Macoutes' (22) while from the same start Stephens went up, did a backward somersault off, then up again, 'Street Café' (21). In August Stephens led Brian Birchall up the chimney 'Instrument Of Revenge' (17). Paul (Animal) Colyvan got wind of the possibility of new routes and in December, with Birchall and Simon Gay put up the very scary and dangerous 'Cheap Regrets' (22). The same month Colyvan returned with Stephens and Dixon to do 'Bangin’ Beava' (24).

Well that’s it for now. There are still some cracks left but the best routes will be the walls and faces littered with chicken heads. Protection will require the use of modern technology. It’s all there waiting for you!

1.9.1. Magic bean 4 routes in Boulder

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 152.249686, -30.441969

Description:

Walk along the track until the split, then head left for 50m then turn right and the magic bean is obvious and only 20m up hill from the track.

1.9.2. North side 8 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Trad

Long/Lat: 152.250722, -30.433291

Description:

As you approach the main cliff from the track, you will see a wide crack up high to the left of the track. This is the second pitch of Tontons Macoutes and Street Cafe. To get to the start, scrub bash across to the base of the pillar.

1.9.3. South side 1 route in Cliff

Summary:
All Trad

Long/Lat: 152.250559, -30.433915

Description:

On the Southern side there is only one route to date. This is 'Morlock'. It follows a crack that goes from the Southern side of the rock to the Northern (main cliff) side. The potential for many other routes on the Southern side is endless. However you’ll need electronic technology to protect most new routes.

1.9.4. Woolpack rocks 0 routes in Sector

Description:

A bit of a long walk in but has some cool granite features not seen anywhere else in the New England. Best approached from the Native Dog campground on the Guyra - Ebor road.

History:

A couple different groups have spent time working stuff around 2010-2011 but not much recorded.

1.9.5. Boon Docks 44 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Boulder
Description:

Fun bouldering / climbing area with some fun lines.

Approach:

2mins

1.10. Wollomombi Falls 7 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad, Sport and Unknown

Long/Lat: 152.040002, -30.533920

Unique Features And Strengths:

One of the most spectacular gorge systems in Australia. Long, serious, chossy adventure climbing in a remote setting.

Description:

Wollomombi falls was once believed to be the tallest waterfall in Australia. However, geographical revisions place them at second or third tallest, depending on the source. Regardless, the gorge is very spectacular with many sheer faces. Unfortunately, the quality of the metamorphosed mudstone deteriorates very quickly as you move away from the stream.

Activities around the gorge including hiking trails or canyoning trips down Wollomombi or Chandler Falls and continuing downstream thorugh a steep sieded canyon known as the 'Inaccessible Gulf'. The valley widens about 4km downstream of the falls. The upper reaches of the gorge should be avoided when water levels are high.

Approach:

The falls are near the tiny village of Wollomombi, about 40km. east of Armidale off the Grafton/Dorrigo Road (Waterfall Way). They are well signposted. Park at the car park/picnic area. Getting into the gorge is not easy. You can either abseil down the Wollomombi Falls Rap Route or scramble down into the gorge. The recommended scrambling route into the gorge requires no abseils but it is loose and dangerous. From the car park walk 100m towards the falls where there is a long grassy platform slightly below the rim of the gorge. At the far-left end of the platform is a gully and rib. Stick to the very loose rib. Stay on the rib, making a few detours around minor obstacles, until you pass a huge landslip on your left and finally reach a small saddle. The spur bluffs out beyond the next high point beyond the saddle. From the saddle, move down right, until you arrive at a steep, slippery watercourse. A scrubby steep spur to the right of the watercourse avoids the steep section in the gully. Once below this section continue on down the watercourse until you arrive at another steep section close to the gorge floor. From here move left into bushes and scree, down to the gorge floor. If you get lost you will have to abseil. Walk up the left-hand river past the junction to the base of the falls. If you are doing the Ridge, go straight up between the two rivers from the junction.

Where To Stay:

There is a National Park campground at the falls.

Ethic:

Old School.

History:

1960's

Rock climbing in the Armidale district is believed to have commenced around 1960 at Dangars Falls. Two climbers, John (Action) Lindsay and Hugh Spencer, at that time, climbed the waterfall face right of the water-course. This is of course the climb known today as Action. At the same time it is believed that they also climbed the orange pinnacle right of Action.

Looking for other great challenges, in 1961 Lindsay and party attempted and completed the first ascent of the Wollomombi-Chandler Ridge. Obviously other members of the Mountaineering Club thought they were a little crazy, as none of these climbs were recorded. No doubt Lindsay and others attempted/completed other climbs but unfortunately no records were kept.

The first recorded climbs were completed in 1964.

Bob Harden and Doug McLean formed a climbing group called the Delta Club, a breakaway group from the University Of New England Mountaineering Club (UNEMC). Starts of climbs were marked with a Delta instead of the usual square. Some of these markings were still visible at Bakers Creek in the early seventies but have since been worn away. Two climbs were put up in 1964 by Harden and McLean. They are Bakercide (6) and Nitrocide(8), both at Bakers Creek. 1965 saw the Delta club leap into action. John Davis and Mike Thomas joined Harden and McLean.

Apart from climbing at Bakers Creek, the group make excursions to Mihi Falls and Dangars Falls. Five new climbs were put up at Bakers Creek. The best being Davicide(13) by Davis, Punjacide(13) by I.Logan and the two aid climbs, ADP(M1) and ryocide(M1), both by Harden. Three climbs were completed at Mihi- the best being the classic Pull Up(15) by Davis. During the same year they made their first visit onto the big, scary wall of Dangars Falls. Harden put up the very run-out Toecap(13), while Davis climbed Goldfinger(16), a climb that hasn’t, at the time of writing this guide, had a second ascent !

In 1966 McLean with Dave Mills repeated Lindsay’s route, giving it the name Action (14), while the best route at Bakers Creek was Normacide (11) by Mills.

1967 produced only two new ones at Bakers Creek. Hardicide (14) by Thomas and the tricky Speleocide (12) by B.Douglas.

The only new route in 1968 was at Dangars, Nightcap (12) by Thomas.

Mills pioneered two new ones at Bakers Creek in 1969. The best being Klettercide (12). Noel Beynon with J.Street had a close look at the rock around Wollomombi Falls. They found and climbed Dono Dedit (8) During this year the Wollomombi-Chandler Ridge became a popular trip. Elaine Cantrill (Elaine’s Gorge-a canyon- is named after her) arrived on the scene, and swinging leads with R.Jones, put up the long Magnificent Obsession (9) on Oaky Falls. The same pair did the first route at Four Mile Creek Falls, Skylite (6).

1970's

The only new route in 1970 was Drednought (14) at Dangars Falls by N.Hughes and Beynon. This takes the corner right of Action and left of the Orange Pillar. Today it is quite loose and probably was then.

1971 produced eight climbs. Five at Bakers Creek- the best being Pissed Psychedelic Peanut (15) by A.Suters and Cornelius Corners (15) by Rob Dixon. Hughes and Beynon found the chossiest route in New England at Wollomombi Falls. It goes up a slabby wall onto the Wollomombi-Chandler Ridge, opposite the falls. It is appropriately titled Violet Crumble Bar (13). J.Street with Dick Gallimore did We Are Not Amused(12), the chimney next to the falls at Four Mile Creek Falls, while R.Jones with Gallimore did Nuttinge (14) at the same crag.

1974 saw Phil Prior arrive, and with Jill Kelman put up a direct start to Nightcap, which they named Copperhead (12). Rob Dixon dragged Bob Killip and Brian Birchall to Mihi to do Deception(14). Prior, at Bakers Creek, disappeared into the mank just downstream of Bakers Creek Falls, to produce Frigid Air (6).

In 1975, Al Stephens with Dixon added the first four pitches to We Are Not Amused (12) at Four Mile Creek Falls. At the same location Killip with Rob Stazewski completed The Killip-Stazewski Route On The East Face Of Four Mile (20). At Mihi Dixon, with Stephens, did Bird On A Wire (16). In 1978, a granite cliff,Flaky Buttress, downstream from Dangars, was discovered by Bob Killip. The result was Plain Sailing (14).

1980's

Dangars received two new ones in 1980. Stephens with Geoff Francis did the multi-pitch Slippery When Wet (13) during a drought, while on the opposite wall Birchall with Francis did Caprice (17). At Bakers Creek Austin Legler with Greg (Dulux) Pritchard did Basilisk (16). Back at Flaky Buttress (Dangars) Jack Lattanzio, with Ed Sharp, warmed up on Fairy Choss (8), and later that year returned with Mark Colyvan to complete Mystery Achievement (20).

1981 saw Dangars Falls yield Total Control (20) by Bayne and Colyvan, as well as Foolscap (18) by Birchall. Downstream, past Flaky Buttress Stephens and Rob Clark found The Richard Cliff and put up three great climbs, the best being Eavesdropper (19) by Stephens and Airs and Graces (19) by Clark. Stephens with Sharp had a Calculated Thrill (16) at Mihi after he did White Man’s Burden (20) with Clark at Bakers Creek. Near The Richard Cliff Pritchard found The Pritchard Cliff and soloed the only route to date, Pariah (5).

In 1982 Paul Bayne found another crag, Dynomight Buttress, near (before ?) Flaky Buttress. No one has been able to locate it since. At Flaky Buttress Stephens put up the great Bombora (20 M1). Bayne managed to eliminated most of the aid but left the grade the same. On Richard Cliff, the next crag down the gorge, Bayne with Stephens, did the powerful Lackluster Backbuster (23).

In 1985, Stephens made a brief visit to Bakers Ck. to establish Cheesy Gland (20), a variant finish to Cornelius Corners.

At Bakers Ck. in 1986 Stephens with Larry Dixon eliminated all aid on ADP, now 21.

1990's

No new routes were put up on or around any of the falls from 1986 until the drought of 1993 when Wollomombi Falls were completely dry! Ben Christian and Stephens did After the Rain (18). The drought continued in 1994 and once again Wollomombi Falls dried up. This time Gordon Low and Stephens with Tim Hill completed a line parallel to After the Rain, called God’s Of Thunder (18).

Most of this guide and the history was documented in 'Waterfalls-A Rock climbers guide to the waterfalls of New England' by Al Stephens (1996)

1.11. Beulah 631 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Boulder

Long/Lat: 150.927251, -30.485121

Unique Features And Strengths:

Rolling terrain covered in (almost) unclimbed granite boulders and domes.

Location of the Annual Beulah Rock Festivus held every Easter and/or ANZAC Day. www.BeulahRockFestivus.com

Description:

Located 1.5 hrs west of Armidale, NSW, Beulah is the Axelsen Family Station. The station is 3000 acres in size and has rolling hills covered in granite boulders as well as 3 large domes up to 70m in height.

Access Issues:

Access to Beulah is only permitted during the Annual Beulah Rock Festivus that is held there every Easter. More info here: www.beulahrockfestivus.com

Approach:

From Armidale, head west on the Bundarra Road. When you come to a T-junction with Thunderbolts Way, turn right. Follow this until the next left after about 5 km, which is Torreyburn Road, which will take you to Kingstown.

From Kingstown head west on the Bendemeer Road for about 3 km then turn right onto Warrabah Road.

Set your trip odometer to zero.

Follow Warrabah Road for 22.6 km going through many dips and over several cattle grids. If you get to 23 km, you have gone too far. You will pass through Warrabah Station and drive by Warrabah Homestead, white metal signs will tell you this. Just before you get to Beulah you will see a sign on the left at a white cattle grid saying welcome to Linton Station. Two hundred metres passed this is Beulah.

You're looking for a green mailbox on the left that says Beulah and has a large piece of steel nailed to a tree with BRF spray painted on it. You made it.

Address is 2317 Warabah Road, Beulah Station.

GPS for Gate: -30.462131 150.919796

Where To Stay:

During the Festivus camping is available and some accommodation is available in two vacant and unfurnished houses.

Ethic:

First ascents are hugely appreciated and the object of climbing at Beulah. Scrubbing lichen and removing loose rock is encouraged but the line is drawn at chipping holds or glueing holds back on. If a hold comes off, please leave it off and climb what the rock affords you.

Bolting is also permitted with permission and as long as there is no available natural protection. For example this includes a 30m climb that requires 9 bolts and one cam or wire to protect. The adding of a 10th bolt for the convenience of not having to carry said wire or nut is not acceptable.

History:

The first boulder problems and routes were scrubbed in 2005. The following year more potential problems were scrubbed, GPS'd and left for another time. The idea for the Festivus began in early 2007 and the first Festivus saw 7 people out in August sending some scrubbed lines. The second annual saw attendance double and the date change to Easter. The third annual event became the a full blown Beulah Rock Festivus complete with sponsorship, prizes, events and climbers from all over Australia. 2010 had 60 people from all over coming out for 4 days of perfect weather and a 132 new problems sent!

In 2011 the 5th Annual had over 120 climbers come out for five days of sun and good times!

1.11.1. Northern areas 101 routes in Area

Summary:
Mostly Boulder

Long/Lat: 150.922659, -30.468505

Description:

All boulders that are near the houses and donger, within walking distance.

1.11.2. Western areas 212 routes in Area

Summary:
Mostly Boulder

Long/Lat: 150.917316, -30.489111

Description:

All areas and boulders that are accessed by driving west and up the hill.

1.11.3. Central Areas 89 routes in Area

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 150.927022, -30.482126

Description:

Central Area includes all the boulders south of the turn for the Swamp Boulders.

1.11.4. Eastern areas 229 routes in Area

Summary:
Mostly Boulder

Long/Lat: 150.940622, -30.481353

Description:

All areas that are accessed by driving east and turning left at the first fork

1.12. Gibraltar Rock 5 routes in Crag

Summary:
Boulder and Trad

Long/Lat: 152.381243, -29.610421

1.12.1. Mulligans Boulder 4 routes in Boulder

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 152.358012, -29.514398

Description:

Located at Mulligans Hut Campsite, this featured boulder sits on top of the hill only 50m from the campsite. If your here for some walking and camping throw your shoes in as the climbs on this boulder are fun on some cool features. These Route names have just been given for the purpose of identification, its likely most of them were done previously and may have other names. There are also literally thousands of other boulders in the park if your keen on exploring.

Approach:

Walk 50m up hill past the firewood hut and water tank.

1.13. Uncarved Block R&D wall 18 routes in Gym

Summary:
All Boulder

Long/Lat: 151.687906, -30.538618

Unique Features And Strengths:

NOT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

This is a research facility for the sole purpose of testing and improving climbing holds. Owned and operated by Uncarved Block Pty Ltd. www.uncarvedblock.com.au

Description:

50 m2 of climbing surface.

1.13.1. 30/40 Wall 8 routes in Feature

Summary:

1.13.2. Brendans Corner 4 routes in Feature

Summary:

1.13.3. Convex 4 routes in Feature

Summary:

1.13.4. The Testing Wall 2 routes in Feature

Summary: