Use this Region Guide to easily find and compare Crags.

Table of contents

1. Victoria 14,521 routes in Region

Summary:
JFMAMJJASOND
seasonality
Trad, Unknown and other styles

Long/Lat: 144.384125, -36.973754

1.1. North West 10,297 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 142.427950, -35.866651

Description:

Mt Cole

1.1.1. Arapiles 2,751 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 141.828307, -36.760663

Unique Features And Strengths:

The most loved and known, easily accessible quality crag in the land.

Description:

Heading towards Arapiles for some legendary climbing and starting to see it clearly for the first time, you will not have been alone if you feel a little disappointed. For taken from a distance Arapiles looks like a pile of choss.

It is the closer inspection that yields a glimpse of the true magic of Arapiles. For this is when Arapiles reveals itself. The beautiful rich golden and gray sandstone, hard and solid. The labyrinth of small gullies and hidden faces, the technical and varied climbing.

Added to this is that the true heart of Australian climbing resides at Arapiles and in particular the campground we call The Pines.

One of the greatest qualities Arapiles has, is its appeal to climbers of all abilities. It must be one of the few crags in the world which offers incredible quality routes at all grades.

The rock quality is such that even the easiest routes involve good rock and beautifully formed holds, a rarity at most crags. In the 'Experienced' range (approx grades 19-24) Arapiles is particularly blessed. It is only from grade 25 upwards that bolts start to kick in. Again the routes that are 25+ are incredibly good.

Climbing at Arapiles is a mixture of superb rock and technical moves on often steep and spectacular ground. Arapiles is the ideal place to become a more proficient trad climber. Arapiles is also very accessible, there are over 2000 routes all within easy walking distance.

One of the greatest things about Arapiles, which draw so many people to it apart from climbing, is the social scene. At popular times of the year the Pines campground can be very crowded, which some people may not like, but it is a good thing, because the atmosphere it creates is very social and friendly. You can turn up without a climbing partner, and be almost guaranteed to meet someone to climb with. It is great for meeting fantastic people from all over the globe.

There is so much more to say on this crag, Australia's premier crag, but that waits for you to discover it.

Access Issues:

State Park

Approach:

300km west of Melbourne.

Driving is your best bet. Public Transport is available- catch the train to Ballarat, bus to Horsham. From Horsham it is easy to hitch a lift or take a feeder bus that runs daily out to Arapiles.

Where To Stay:

The Pines Campground is situated at the base of Arapiles, with water and toilets. Suitable for long and short term camping. More luxurious accommodation can be found in Natimuk i.e. Backpackers or Bed and Breakfast establishments. There is a campground at Lake Natimuk which has showers. Showers are also available at the Natimuk Pub for $5.

Ethic:

Mount Arapiles is first and foremost a trad climbing area. The few sport climbs tend to be in the higher grades where no natural pro is available.

Bolting, particularly retro-bolting, is discouraged and should only be undertaken after extensive consultation with the local climbers, first ascensionists, etc. Inappropriately placed bolts have been chopped.

Do not chip the rock.

Look after the park.

  • Stick to the paths.

  • Don't disturb the wildlife.

  • Routes near peregrine falcon nesting sites are closed in the spring.

  • Minimise the impact of your camping (fuel stoves not fires, take your rubbish with you, etc).

1.1.2. Grampians 7,410 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad, Boulder and other styles

Long/Lat: 142.376338, -37.265302

Unique Features And Strengths:

Some of the best climbing in a Australia in a beautiful environment, often in great solitude.

Description:

For many climbers, memories of the Grampians are like memories of paradise. The warm winter sun, breathtaking sunsets lighting up Taipan Wall and sore tips from hard days. The Grampians are beautiful and the climbing reflects this. The solitude, routes that offer variety and adventure, these are the hallmarks of the Grampians.

The Grampians offer some of the most spectacular and high quality climbing in Australia. The beautiful thing about the Grampians is that it offers so much choice, there is plenty of good easier climbing in fantastic locations, and also probably the best hard routes in the land. When you talk about climbing in the Grampians you are referring to a multitude of crags and thousands of routes. There are a core of popular crags regularly visited, then there are a host of areas that are lucky to be visited more than once a year. The most popular crags are the ones with a combination of good access and a large amount of top routes. Among the most popular areas are 'Mt Stapylton' (which incorporates a number of crags like the enormously popular 'Summerday Valley', 'The Ampitheatre'[11979139] and 'Taipan Wall'), 'Mt Rosea' (loads of quality multipitch routes) and 'Bundaleer' (an intimidating summer crag). Apart from this there is a plethora of marginally less important crags, all of which offer fantastic climbing.

Sport climbing is limited in the Grampians (although what there is, is of fantastic quality), there are three or four main areas, 'The Gallery' (steep thuggery of perfect orange sandstone), 'Millenium Caves'[13001335] (very steep flawless rock with committing runouts), 'Van Diemens Land'[12976261] (great fun) and 'Spurt Wall' (funky fun at the end of 'Taipan Wall'). Sport climbing in the Grampians begins at grade 22, so you want to be fairly competent.

Like Arapiles the trad climbing is very good, and generally the gear is exceptionally solid, there is often the occasional bolt. The harder routes to tend to be mainly on bolts. While you are here it is essential to check out Taipan Wall, unquestionably the best piece of rock in the land.

Climbing in the Grampians is generally less accessible than Arapiles, you will need to have a partner (there is no meeting someone here, unless you are lucky) and a car to get around in. The one benefit of being less accessible is that the Grampians is more of a wilderness experience. Bouldering has recently exploded in the Grampians, and there are loads of great problems to be found, including some of the hardest in the world. Bouldering is a good option if you are here in winter. All up the Grampians is a wonderful place, deserving of a decent stay. You will love it!

Access Issues:

The northern part of the Park, including Mt Stapylton is currently closed to all access following the January 2014 fires. Check the Access Issues for each area.

Here's an update from Parks Victoria:

Grampians National Park Update – 14 February 2014 (Rock climbing and Bouldering)

The Northern Grampians Fire severely burnt the natural environment and much of the park infrastructure in and around Hollow Mountain, Summer Day Valley and Mt Stapylton – this includes many popular rock climbing and bouldering sites; as a result there are many park closures in place. The dry, rocky landscape is now extremely fragile and will take a long time to recover – the fire burnt extremely hot so in many cases regeneration will now occur (very slowly) from seed. Loss of vegetation, loose rocks, unstable soils and loss of access tracks means any foot traffic will have long term impacts on the recovery of the environment. Impacts now will also affect the sustainability of rock climbing sites well into the future.

Please respect the fragility of the environment and support the long term recovery of the Northern Grampians by remaining out of any closed areas. While Parks Victoria regrets the need to enforce closures, substantial fines will be imposed on those found in any closed, fire affected area.

Parks Victoria recognises the importance and popularity of the Northern Grampians to the rock climbing and bouldering communities and will be working closely with industry and community representatives throughout a staged reopening process. Environmental considerations will largely determine when sites are available to be reopened, and replacement of damaged infrastructure will occur as suitable funding is available.

As part of the recovery process, Parks Victoria will be identifying alternative options for climbing and bouldering, and will closely monitor impacts on these sites as their use and popularity increases. There will also be significant work done on the future experience of visitors in the Northern Grampians.

Parks Victoria is continuing to improve its understanding of the needs of climbers and boulderers and is intent on providing an experience that is well respected, regarded, promoted and understood throughout the Australian and International Climbing and bouldering communities.

Parks Victoria will be relying heavily on the climbing industry to work together to spread the messages about the fragility of the landscape and the long term sustainability of rock climbing in the Grampians. There may be opportunities for licenced tour operators, school and community based groups to become involved in the recovery process.

Due to closures in the Northern Grampians, the availability of rock climbing, camping, car touring and bushwalking experiences is limited. Sourcing information on available campgrounds and other accommodation options is recommended. Please visit www.parkweb.vic.gov.au for park maps and regular Grampians fire recovery updates.

For detailed information on available rockclimbing and bouldering sites in and near to the Grampians please refer to recognised guidebooks/websites. A general list of open and available areas includes the following:

Rockclimbing sites open in the Grampians:

  • Wonderland Range
  • Serra Range (Including Mt Rosea and Bundaleer)
  • Mt William Range
  • Victoria Point area
  • Victoria Range (Including the Red Rock, Muline and the Gallery area. Please respect cultural heritage and recovering fire affected areas)

Limited Bouldering Sites available in and near the Grampians:

  • Victoria Range (Including the Gallery area. Please respect cultural heritage and recovering fire affected areas)
  • Serra Range (Including Mt Rosea and Bundaleer)
  • Mt Arapiles
  • Mt Talbot
  • The Black Range

Please remember your climbing etiquette:

  • Only climb and boulder in open accessible areas
  • Stick to tracks
  • Respect fragile environmental areas and cultural heritage
  • Keep an eye out for Aboriginal Art sites – Report to Parks Victoria if you come across anything new.
  • Be mindful of cleaning
  • No chipping or bolting
  • Avoid excessive chalk
  • Take your rubbish home with you

Parks Victoria - Grampians National Park

National Park

Approach:

235km west of Melbourne. Driving is best. You can catch a train to Ballarat, then bus to Halls Gap. The only problem is that once you are there there is no way to get around unless you hire a car, or know someone that has one.

Where To Stay:

There are campgrounds throughout the Grampians. Most do have fees, but they are generally very reasonable.

Also a range of accommodation (cabins, B&B, backpackers, motels, etc) in Halls Gap and the other villages around the National Park.

1.1.3. Mt Hope 60 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown
Unique Features And Strengths:

The northern most climbing in Victoria. Too hot in summer. This crag is best in winter when everywhere else in Victoria is too wet.

Description:

Large granite monolith near Pyramid Hill on the Tragowel Plains. The rock is large grained and very coarse and is of variable quality. There are some quality routes, but beauty may be in the eye of the beholder.

Access Issues:

No access issues. This area is in a nature reserve and contains some rare and endangered flora and fauna. It may look pretty scrappy, but please take care and look after this area if you visit.

Approach:

From Melbourne/south, head to Pyramid Hill and then drive north on the Pyramid Hill - Leitchville Rd until you see the Major Mitchell Trail sign to Mt Hope. Turn left and drive 1.5 km on the dirt. Turn left at the first opportunity to get to the Picnic Ground, or drive another 500 m to the next left to reach Suicide Rock car park

Where To Stay:

You can camp at Mt Hope, but it's pretty rough - no water or toilets. In summer the flies will carry you away during the day and the mosquitoes will take over after dark.

Ethic:

Trad as well as bolted sport routes, with a mix of carrots and fixed hangers.

1.1.4. Mt Kooyoora 66 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 143.704930, -36.596903

1.1.5. Mt Cole 10 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 143.229378, -37.270722

1.2. Granite Highlands 197 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 145.153557, -36.600427

1.2.1. Big Hill 32 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad and Boulder

Long/Lat: 145.432135, -36.829456

Unique Features And Strengths:

Granite crack climbing and bouldering close to Melbourne, no crowds, great views, short walk to access, easy to top rope.

Description:

Granite crag just over an hour from Melbourne, situated in a Flora reserve which runs along the highway. Good views north, nice rock and smattering of lines in the 17-24 grade. Short cliffline easy to toprope, highest route is only 25m, and features some interesting cracks on good qaulity granite that is kind on the paws; a good spot for beginners to granite cracks. Climbs are generally crack affairs, there is one bolted line at time of writing, but potential for more on some faces. Makes a good little daytrip from Melbourne if you are sick of the local stuff and don't want to drive to Gramps or Araps. A nice trip is to do Big Hill and nearby Tennerife. Its a lovely location with great views north, lots of wildlife and a few climbs that stay in the shade through summer.

Access Issues:

The land is a Flora Reserve, so it is legal to climb here and there is no need to ask permission - but respect the land and leave gates as you found them. There are some endangered wildflowers that grow amongst the crag boulders and cliffs (some can be found on the 'sandpaper terrace', as well as numerous wombats, echidnas and falcons, so be aware.

Approach:

This is a roadside crag just off the Hume Highway. From Melbourne, head north on the Hume. A few minutes after the Avenel roadhouse you will see Mt Tennerife on your right, keep heading north until You see a turnoff for Berry Lane. Turn right, then left onto the dirt road just off the highway. Before the top of the crest you will see a gate on the right, park here, and follow the fire trail up the hill to the north. The Southern Boulders are obviously on the southern side of the ridge, and the crag is on the northern face. Climbs are described from this approach.

To get to the better boulders you need to contour around the ridge and pick out the stuff with good potential.

Where To Stay:

Nearby towns Avenel, Longwood, Seymour and Euroa have hotels and other accomodation.

History:

In 1969, 'Trial' (6) and 'Coolu' (5) were established, as well as the other 'chimney', 'Tribulation' (14). Chris Baxter aided Dipsomania with his brother in 1970 and led the crag favourite 'Cut Throat Crack' with Keith Lockwood. In '74 those routes went free by Mike Law, who also happened to solo a second ascent of 'A smile from Julia', and soloing the FA of 'Lightstropper'. 1974 also saw visits from Nic Taylor, Reg Marron, Iain Sedgeman, Peter Watson and Andrew Bowman took most of the obvious lines. In 1975 Mike Law and Kim Carrigan returned to put of more comments from Julia. Things stayed quiet with focus moving to the bigger crag down the road at Mt Tenerife. In the late 1990's Pat McVeigh-Mcconnel and Darryl McConnel put up the nice beginner line 'Mosquito Corner', a rather difficult 10. Steve Wilson and Robin Holmes finished off the last of what was available in 2002 with 'Battle of the Bulge', the one star 'Lost for Words' and 'Gravel Rash' all on the sandpaper terrace. They also added a nice variant to the already enjoyable 'Tribulation' at 18.

1.2.2. Teneriffe 82 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

Long/Lat: 145.388571, -36.845580

Approach:© (willmonks)

Quite obvious to spot when driving along the Hume freeway, between Seymour and Euroa, southeast of the road.

1.2.3. Wombat Rock 3 routes in Cliff

Summary:
Trad and Aid

Long/Lat: 116.440268, -32.373922

1.2.4. Central Quarry 4 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Unknown

1.2.5. Killeen's Hill 2 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Unknown

1.2.6. The Rockery 4 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Unknown

1.2.7. Rolling Stone Wall 13 routes in Cliff

Summary:
Unknown and Aid

Long/Lat: 145.639237, -36.855472

1.2.8. Kobyboyne 1 route in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 145.376520, -37.064530

1.2.9. Pulpit Rock 14 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

1.2.10. South Blue Range (Andromeda) 2 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

1.2.11. The Bishop's Mitre 2 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown and Aid

1.2.12. Strathbogie Ranges 13 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 145.761491, -36.885049

1.2.13. Warby Ranges 2 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 146.187546, -36.313804

1.2.14. Warragul Rocks (Tallarook) 23 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown, Trad and Aid

Long/Lat: 145.206863, -37.136154

Description:

Located in the Tallarook state forest. Granite slabs.

The crag doesn't get huge amount of love and features a lot of vegetation on some of the routes.

The area has had some problems with bogans dumping cars and other rubbish off the top of the cliffs (the access road drives right up to the top) so the landowner who controls access has asked that climbers contact him to let him know you are coming through.

The landowner wishes you to "Please ensure you contact me prior to accessing the rocks on the following number: Ron Milanovic mobile - 0413 402 744".

1.3. North East 1,276 routes in Region

Summary:
Unknown, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 147.150036, -36.682385

1.3.1. Buffalo 781 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 146.774778, -36.706165

1.3.2. Beechworth Area 161 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad, Boulder and other styles

Long/Lat: 146.690061, -36.356962

Description:

The area centred on Beechworth and bounded by the Hume Freeway on the northwest, the Alpine Road from Wangaratta to Myrtleford on the southwest, and the road from Albury to Myrtleford (via Yackandandah) on the east. Almost all of the rock is granite and a many of the crags are collections of boulders of varying sizes.

1.3.3. Felltimber Creek Crag 101 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Boulder

Long/Lat: 146.824504, -36.128093

Unique Features And Strengths:

A compact bouldering area on the outskirts of Wodonga.

Description:

Felltimber Creek Crag is a collection of granite boulders on the south side of the hill just west of Wodonga. It is a good place to spend an afternoon, with several excellent problems and a large number of worthwhile ones. The problems are also quite varied, from slabs to faces to rooves to cracks. There are also a small number of roped climbs - Where Bovines Fear To Tread and Pimp Daddy Superstar being the highlights.

Approach:

From Melbourne, take the 1st Wodonga exit (Melbourne Rd). Turn R at the first intersection past the overpass (Moorefield Park Drive). From Sydney, take the 3rd Wodonga exit (Melrose Dr). After crossing the railway line, turn R at the roundabout onto Melbourne Rd. Then take the first L onto Moorefield Park Drive. Once you're on Moorefield Park Drive, follow this to the end (a T intersection) and turn R onto Felltimber Creek Road. Follow this down a hill and over a bridge. About 400m after you pass Ingrams Rd (on the R), there's a carpark. Follow the obvious walking track to the climbing areas (which are on the S side of the hill). The carpark is marked on the street map with an X. The walking track is marked on the satellite map in green, and access to the crags is marked in yellow dashes.

1.3.4. Mansfield 2 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 146.097777, -37.068660

1.3.5. Omeo 96 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

Long/Lat: 147.590324, -37.079659

1.3.6. Corryong 61 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 147.923241, -36.180918

1.3.7. Buchan 41 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

Long/Lat: 148.211470, -37.463598

1.3.8. Wulguulmerang 13 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

1.3.9. Mt Ellery 2 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 148.792454, -37.375279

1.3.10. Snobbs Creek 1 route in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

1.3.11. Mt Bogong 17 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Ice

Long/Lat: 147.306702, -36.740332

1.3.12. Mt Buller 0 routes in Crag

1.4. Melbourne and Surrounds 2,524 routes in Region

Summary:
Unknown, Sport and other styles

Long/Lat: 144.703679, -37.796807

1.4.1. The You Yangs 609 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown, Sport and other styles

Long/Lat: 144.416768, -37.935513

Unique Features And Strengths:

Typically this granite outcrop of boulders and slabs offers mostly short low angled face climbs on rough rock with small holds.

Description:

Only 352 m in height the granite peaks of the You Yangs dominate the Werribee lava plains and are clearly identifiable from Melbourne and beyond.

Access Issues:

National Park. Parks Vic website (Oct 2014) says "[...] Bookings are required for groups. Individuals are not required to book, but should check with the Park Office to enquire about the availability of sites. [...]"

Approach:

You Yangs Regional Park is 55 km south-west of Melbourne and 22 km north of Geelong (Melway ref: Key map 11). Access to the park from the Geelong-Melbourne Freeway is clearly signposted via Little River or Lara.

1.4.2. Staughton Vale 15 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

Long/Lat: 144.269958, -37.846175

Description:

Top-roping or trad.

Approach:

From Anakie drive down the ballan-geelong rd then turn right on to staughton vale rd then take a left at mcleans hwy. After several km's you will reach a car park on the left and then it is a 10 minute walk along the track to the face.

1.4.3. Black Hill 94 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport

Long/Lat: 144.488692, -37.185911

Unique Features And Strengths:

Slabby granite tors. A mini version of the You Yangs but with shade.

Access Issues:

Forest Reserve

Approach:

Take the Calder Hwy out of Melbourne. Get off at the Kyneton exit and head into town. Turn R onto the Edgecombe-Eppalock Rd.

Drive about 6km. When the road turns to the R turn R into Ennis Rd. Follow Ennis Rd for 750m and park at the gate and information shelter.

There are two entry points into the reserve. The ‘Front Gate’ entrance is located on the north western side of the reserve, whilst the ‘Back Gate’ is located on the south eastern side of the reserve.

‘Back Gate’ access: Calder Freeway to Kyneton exit and then right at the roundabout and take C326 Heathcote - Kyneton Rd and head towards Edgecombe. Pass Verekers Lane then turn right into Hallorans Lane. Drive to the end of the road and turn left at the T junction onto Black Hill Rd (unsealed) and follow this for 1.7km to a turnaround and gate (Back Gate). Park at the gate and enter the reserve.

Back Gate approach: From the Back Gate car park follow the trail until you hit the Circuit Track and turn right. Follow the Circuit Track until you arrive at the 1st of 2 picnic benches located near eachother. The large boulder on the left is The Monolith Boulder.

1.4.4. Camels Hump 157 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 144.597294, -37.369643

Description:

Mount Macedon is a small town located 64 kilometers northwest of Melbourne. Camels Hump is the highest peak of Mount Macedon. This rocky outcrop was once a small steep-sided volcano. It's steep and solid rock, with a variety of short, pumpy sport routes and taller trad lines calls to climbers not wanting to make a long drive to the bigger named crags. If you're leading grades 16 to 20 there's plenty of quality here worth ticking.

Approach:

Take the Calder Hwy out of Melbourne. Get off at the Mt Macedon exit and head up the Mount. The easiest approach to the crag is to simply walk along a trail marked "Emergency Use Only", that leaves from the Camel's Hump car park, and weaves around to the base of the Omega Block area.

1.4.5. Hanging Rock 112 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

Long/Lat: 144.594208, -37.330012

Access Issues:

This crag has been closed for years. :-(

1.4.6. Bullengarook Slate Quarry 13 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 144.499500, -37.468798

1.4.7. The Cathedral Range 219 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

Long/Lat: 145.767259, -37.404474

Unique Features And Strengths:

Long (100m plus) multi-pitch climbs on fantastic sandstone slabs. Mainly trad.

Description:

Fun adventure climbing. Allow enough light for the approach and descent which can be tricky for first time visitors. The majority of climbs are east facing and sunny until around 2pm. It gets cold very quickly when the sun passes behind the range.

Approach:

119km from Melbourne, 18km from Buxton.

Where To Stay:

Camping is permitted at several locations in the park. Possible as a day trip from Melbourne and surrounds.

1.4.8. Ben Cairn 48 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 145.620465, -37.718846

Unique Features And Strengths:

Described by Mike Law as "possibly the worst cliff in the world, with some of the best climbs", you'll either love it or hate it.

Description:

Ben Cairn is granite outcrop situated about 1.5 hours east of Melbourne. The surrounding area is heavily forested, picturesque but is not suitable for climbing in the winter.

It's a five minute walk in from the road and contains around 40 routes protected by a mixture of bolts and trad gear.

You can belay from the tourist guard railing or set up top ropes. Most routes involve friction slabbing. The rock is very fine grained making slab moves sometimes slippery.

Update: 25 Sep, 2011. Many routes may need cleaning to be safely climbed on lead.

Access Issues:

From Melbourne take the Maroondah Highway to Healesville. Go through town, past the bridge, turn right at Don Rd and go 9.8km to a junction. Keep driving about 8km and the road becomes dirt. You pass a sign stating "Ben Cairn 1040m". Walk 5 minutes up the foot track to gain access to the crag.

Approach:

Follow the track marked Ben Cairn from the car park.

1.4.9. Four Brothers Rock Outcrop 2 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 145.633783, -37.965402

1.4.10. Seven Acre Rock 11 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

Long/Lat: 145.749825, -37.913765

Description:

Seven Acre Rock resides deep within the Yarra State Forest about an hour and a half east of Melbourne. There are a limited number of routes, most involve friction slabbing and runouts on bolts. Bouldering problems can be found on the hillside.

Access Issues:

To get to Seven Acre Rock from Yarra Junction take the C425 and head towards Powelltown for 14.8kms. Turn right at "Learmonth Creek Road" (unsealed) for 8.5 - 9kms then turn left onto Bunyip Road at a T intersection. (Do turn at either of the two preceding lefts). You come to a picnic area with a marked foot track leading off on the left.

1.4.11. Mt Cannibal 5 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown and Trad

Long/Lat: 145.681643, -38.052275

1.4.12. Mount Erica Rocks 46 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

Long/Lat: 146.360375, -37.882547

Unique Features And Strengths:

Mt Erica Rocks provides a vast number of high quality granite boulders with very high frictional properties The boulders are situated amongst scenic alpine forest.

Description:

Most of the routes are bolted, so you could get away with a sport climbers rack, though there are a few trad cracks to climb. Mostly the routes are not that tall and most are quite hard to get up.

Access Issues:

To gain access from Melbourne drive to Moe in the north-east of the state via the Princess Hwy, and take the road to the locality of Erica. About 10kms afterwards, turn left to the signposted Mt Erica, and drive on up. Take the walking track from the car park for about 30 minutes to the boulder field.

1.4.13. Cape Woolamai 58 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown and Trad

Long/Lat: 145.352294, -38.555893

Unique Features And Strengths:

A wild and beautiful area offing varied quality climbing but always a grand day out

Description:

Pink granite sea cliffs located on Phillip Island, just over the bridge from the mainland. Not for the inexperienced. Tides, weather, and choss may dictate your approach and retreat so be prepared. Fixed protection is not trustworthy; bring slings for rap anchors

Access Issues:

This is a sea cliff, so tides are an obvious factor. Check charts before departing. Grassy areas atop the cliffs are rookeries for mutton birds and penguins, so stick to established tracks. Nest burrows will collapse if trodden on. This is a special and unique environment, so read the signs and behave accordingy

Approach:

From the Wollamai beach carpark, follow the beach/walking track towards the headlands visible to the southeast. Access to the rock is easily visible as penguin tracks down from the lookout area

Where To Stay:

Nearby Phillip Island towns Rhyll and Cowes, and San Remo just over the bridge offer a variety of accommodation

Ethic:

Trad ethic predominates, largely due to the the short lifespan of fixed steel in the salty spray. Anchors are often slung bollards so bring some tat to lower off

History:

Having seen some climbing over previous decades, there's been renewed interest in recent years

1.4.14. Plenty Gorge 18 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

1.4.15. Werribee Gorge 111 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad

Long/Lat: 144.350420, -37.660207

Unique Features And Strengths:

Good variety of short routes close to Melbourne

Access Issues:

State park

Parks Victoria advises that 'Falcons Lookout' is currently the only area open for climbing.

Approach:

Take the Western Highway out of Melbourne. Take the first exit into Bacchus Marsh. Go into Bacchus Marsh, turn L into Grant St (just before the hill). Go straight ahead for about 1km, crossing the river and then turning R into Griffith St at the roundabout just before the railway crossing. Go about 2km then veer R into McCormack Road at the golf course. Cross the railway line then turn hard R into Ironbark Rd.

To get to 'Falcons Lookout' follow Ironbark Rd for 6km to a parking area on the R after you cross the railway again, but before you go under the railway bridge. A Parks Victoria information sign marks the beginning of the walking track. Follow track through Ironbark Gorge to Falcons Lookout (Sign posted 40 minute walk, actual time = 25 min.).

Ethic:

Visitors are encouraged to use this area responsibly and to adopt safe practices during all climbing and aseiling activities. The use of safety equipment, including helmets, is recommended.

Please keep to the tracks, observe access agreements, remove all rubbish, and climb safely.

History:

Werribee Gorge's potential for rockclimbing was noticed by Keith Lockwood in 1970. His enthusiasm for the cliff's strong architecture was tempered by access difficulties but later visits by Norm Booth revealed easier access, allowing visitors to quickly develop 'Falcons Lookout' (the Ampitheatre).

1.4.16. Inner Melbourne 254 routes in Region

Summary:
Boulder, Sport and other styles

Long/Lat: 145.054409, -37.883380

1.4.17. Whipstick Gully Quarry 6 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

1.4.18. Loddon River Falls 8 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 144.242380, -37.279742

1.4.19. 'bluestone supercrags' 12 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown and Boulder

1.4.20. Sheoak Falls (Lorne) 1 route in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 143.959938, -38.538294

1.4.21. Melton Creek 17 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 144.580087, -37.701759

Unique Features And Strengths:

Plenty of broken glass and bogans on a warm summer evening

Description:

The "cliff face" is probably only 6m tall at it's peak. Some of the rock is friable, some is ok...

Access Issues:

Watch out for broken glass and snakes

Approach:

Exit the Western Highway turning L into Coburns Rd. Turn L at the first traffic lights (Richard Rd) and follow to T intersection with Station Rt. Tun R into Station Rd and the L into Fraser St (2nd left). Continue along throuh sweeping right hand turn and park opposite Mcdonald St. Look L and enjoy your climbing.

1.4.22. The Organ Pipes 14 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

1.4.23. Lal Lal Falls 18 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 144.044522, -37.652512

1.4.24. Coral Island 13 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 144.076668, -37.683848

Unique Features And Strengths:

esoteric crag: short crappy climbs on dubious tilted mudstone slabs set in a nice location

Access Issues:

high clearance 2wd helps. refer vcc south-west guide for more info.

Where To Stay:

some good campsites next to the river

Ethic:

none

1.4.25. Treasure Island 8 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 144.077112, -37.683936

1.4.26. Leigh River 4 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

1.4.27. Ironbark Gorge 16 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 144.098443, -38.444363

1.4.28. Cumberland River 16 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

Long/Lat: 143.948038, -38.572109

1.4.29. Meredith 20 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport and Unknown

Long/Lat: 144.123824, -37.831552

1.4.30. Mount Beckworth 380 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

Long/Lat: 143.717582, -37.313325

1.4.31. Mt Alexander 180 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown, Trad and other styles

Long/Lat: 144.303959, -37.002014

1.4.32. The ROCK Adventure Centre (Geelong) 39 routes in Gym

Summary:
Sport and Boulder

Long/Lat: 144.343984, -38.161858

Description:

If you climb at The ROCK you can use the generic routes below to keep your training logbook up to date.

Approach:

Rear 403 (River End) Pakington St Newtown Geelong

1.5. Gippsland 205 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

Long/Lat: 147.407567, -37.924849

1.5.1. Toora 2 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 146.392671, -38.672559

1.5.2. Alpine National Park (Southern) 61 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 146.848368, -37.502738

1.5.3. Glen Maggie 3 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

1.5.4. Nowa Nowa - NSW Border 12 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

1.5.5. Rosedale - Stratford 0 routes in Crag

1.5.6. Stratford - Bairnsdale 0 routes in Crag

1.5.7. Bairnsdale - Nowa Nowa 0 routes in Crag

1.5.8. Wilson's Promontory 99 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Unknown

Long/Lat: 146.287939, -38.935155

Access Issues:

A permit is required to climb in this National Park. It is only legal to climb at Mt Bishop Slabs, Elephant Rock, Mt Oberon, Trackside Wall and Turtle Rock. No permit is required for bouldering at the north end of Squeaky Beach. A permit can be obtained from the park office at Tidal River. Permits must be carried at all times and produced on demand to an authorised officer of Parks Victoria.

Where To Stay:

The campground at Tidal River is your only real option.

Ethic:

Bolting is prohibited in the National Park. 'Gardening' (removal or damage to vegetation on climbs) or wire brushing to remove lichen or moss is prohibited. Chipping holds or marking the start of climbs is prohibited. Access the cliffs using existing paths and if appropriate descend by abseil rather than scrambling.

Non-compliance with these regulations may result in cancellation of your permit and/or further penaty

1.5.9. Dargo 28 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Unknown

Long/Lat: 147.260817, -37.478562

1.6. South West 22 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad and Unknown

Long/Lat: 142.445193, -38.024027

1.6.1. Nigretta Falls 4 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Trad

Long/Lat: 141.927250, -37.657259

1.6.2. Seal Wall (Cape Bridgewater Blow Holes) 7 routes in Crag

Summary:
Unknown and Trad

Long/Lat: 141.368412, -38.379789

1.6.3. Prufrock 11 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Trad

Long/Lat: 141.931904, -37.471992

Approach:

Head South on Dundas Gap Rd Turn left into Dundas Scenic Reserve and follow track until vague pull out on the left. Walk directly up hill to the scattered cliff.