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The prominent rock structure you see just opposite the camp with long and challenging slabs on the front and steeper climbs on the back.

Access issues inherited from Ogawayama

Much of the information about this crag is from the online guide http://www.ogawayama.com/


Wander down to the river from the lodge and look for a cairn that marks the start of a path on the opposite bank. Cross the river wherever possible and follow the path a short way into the woods. Where it steepens, drop down left for the lower slab, or follow the path up and right for the upper walls.


Ethic inherited from Japan

There`s not a lot of information about in English on climbing in Japan. Much of the information is kept in personal blogs or is accessed through joining a climbing organization.

Many of the routes are well protected, while other less climbed "sport" routes have loose pitons as protection.

The Japan Free Climbing Association does a lot of good work (http://freeclimb.jp/seibi/seibi.htm) but with some clubs and communities, many techniques and ethics are still passed down from old generations with outdated gear and techniques.


Some content has been provided under license from: © Neil Harrison (Copyright www.ogawayama.com)


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