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Pangaea Walls

  • Grade context: AU
  • Ascents: 8

Access: Climbing restrictions may apply

ACAV Note: Parks Victoria has advised that rock climbing restrictions may apply at certain locations. Formal advice has changed several times during 2019.

Please refer to the following link for PV's current advice:

https://parkweb.vic.gov.au/explore/parks/grampians-national-park/plans-and-projects/rock-climbing-faq

For a list of crags in SPA areas see:

https://savegrampiansclimbing.org/the-ban/closed-areas/

See warning details and discuss

Created about a year ago - Edited 6 months ago

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Description

Most of the following has been copied directly from Kieran Loughran's excellent Amphitheatre guide - thanks!

A collection of buttresses on the north-east slopes of 'Mount Zero' with a couple of good hard routes, another couple of reasonable easy climbs and a lot of choss.

Most of the routes here have their starts initialled in case they get lost (no great loss for the most part). This area was burnt-out in early 1996 so is probably heavy with regrowth by now.

© (willmonks)

Access issues inherited from Grampians

ACAV Note: Parks Victoria has advised that rock climbing restrictions may apply at certain locations. Formal advice has changed several times during 2019. Please refer to the following link for current and detailed advice: https://parkweb.vic.gov.au/explore/parks/grampians-national-park/plans-and-projects/rock-climbing-faq

Please note that due to the fact that the Grampians is a National Park, dogs and other pets are not allowed in the park except in vehicles on sealed roads and in sealed car parks. See http://m.parkweb.vic.gov.au/explore/parks/grampians-national-park/safety-and-regulations#overview

Approach

Either park near the sweeping bend as you proceed from the 'Mount Zero' Picnic Area to the 'Hollow Mountain' quarry and walk towards the lowest of the blocks or follow the summit walking track to just before 'Descartes' and drop down and around.

© (willmonks)

Ethic inherited from Grampians

Grampians access issues have emerged due to potential damage to the environment and cultural sites. Climbers need to be aware that there are significant Aboriginal sites in the Grampians, especially in cave areas. Leave no trace and treat everything with care.

The following is a basic list of things climbers in the Grampians need to be aware of. For more detailed information visit https://www.cliffcare.org.au/education

Climber’s Code

Find out about and observe access restrictions and agreements.

Use existing access tracks to minimise erosion - don’t create rock cairns or leave marking tape.

Do not disturb nesting birds or other wildlife.

Vegetation, even on cliff faces, is protected. Wire brushing to remove mosses and 'gardening' in cracks and gullies is not permitted. Use slings to protect trees while belaying or abseiling if belay anchors are not provided.

Large groups can create problems of crowding and excessive damage around cliffs. If you plan to take a group of ten or more people climbing, you are required to register to ensure there is space.

Respect sites of geological, cultural, or other scientific interest. Don't climb near Aboriginal sites

Vehicles must stay on roads open to the public; off-road driving is illegal.

Do not leave any rubbish - take it home with you.

Keep campsites clean.

Avoid all risk of fire - do not light campfires outside of official campground metal fire pits.

Dispose of human waste in a sanitary manner (bury, or even better pack it out) Do not pollute water supplies.

Respect established climbing traditions in ethical matters such as the use of chalk, pitons, bolts etc.

Avoid indiscriminate or excessive use of fixed equipment.

Responsible climbing will protect cliffs and ensure continued rockclimbing

Tags

Some content has been provided under license from: © Australian Climbing Association Queensland (Creative Commons, Attribution, Share-Alike 2.5 AU)

Routes

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Grade Route

It's unfortunate that this crack was bolted, but it's a bit late to do anything about it now. It almost deserves two stars to con sport-climbers into jamming.

Start: On the lowest and east-most crag, there is an overhang with a bolted crack through the ceiling.

FA: Andy Pollitt, 1991

Kachoong on roids! 50m uphill from Sport Crack is a wall capped by large roofs. This route climbs right edge of wall then swings left across massive roof flake and straight through the guts of the overhang above. 7 RBs.

FA: Neil Monteith & Adam Demmert, 18 Nov 2012

Good, strenuous route...unless it's an April Fool's joke.

FA: Andy Pollitt, 1991

Leave it for Saddam Hussein. This description is as accurate as a Scud missile.

Start: Start L of 'Ephemeral Lakes'.

FA: David Burnett & Andrew Geelan, 1991

The name is much more interesting than the climb.

FA: Megan Rush, Burnett & Geelan, 1991

A very short pump. Desperate and worthless.

FA: Geelan, 1991

You would have to be extremely desperate.

FA: Geelan, 1991

R-leading diagonal for 2m. Delicately up and follow L line.

Start: On the steep, yellow buttress most prominent from the road, just behind (south of) Pangaea Wall. Start 4m L of undercut arete.

FA: Michael Gidding, David Burnett, Rohan Schaap & Paul Watson, 1991

Balance R from vegetated chimney for 2m, then up through bulge and up groove.

Start: On a compact, bulging buttress below and R of the highest bluff of 'Pangaea Walls'. Start at distinctive pink-stained rock on L, below tiny roof.

FA: David Burnett & Andrew Geelan, 1991

Roof left of "Sport Crack".

FA: Phil Neville, Oct 2011

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