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The Cheesecake

Access: Climbing restrictions may apply

ACAV Note: Parks Victoria has advised that rock climbing restrictions may apply at certain locations. Formal advice has changed several times during 2019.

Please refer to the following link for PV's current advice:

https://parkweb.vic.gov.au/explore/parks/grampians-national-park/plans-and-projects/rock-climbing-faq

For a list of crags in SPA areas see:

https://savegrampiansclimbing.org/the-ban/closed-areas/

See warning details and discuss

Created about a year ago - Edited 7 months ago

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Description

'The Cheesecake' is the lower, first line of cliffs at the southern end of 'Mt Abrupt'. The name becomes obvious when you see the (somewhat chossy) cheesecake-like layers on the east facing walls. Moss and lichen is a problem on many routes, but apart from a few wide horrors, the climbing is quite good.

Since the approach brings you to the righthand end of the cliff, climbs are listed right to left.

Almost zero traffic means loose rock and moss abound. Helmets recommended.

Please do not add inscriptions below the cave.

Access issues inherited from Grampians

ACAV Note: Parks Victoria has advised that rock climbing restrictions may apply at certain locations. Formal advice has changed several times during 2019. Please refer to the following link for current and detailed advice: https://parkweb.vic.gov.au/explore/parks/grampians-national-park/plans-and-projects/rock-climbing-faq

Please note that due to the fact that the Grampians is a National Park, dogs and other pets are not allowed in the park except in vehicles on sealed roads and in sealed car parks. See http://m.parkweb.vic.gov.au/explore/parks/grampians-national-park/safety-and-regulations#overview

Approach

Exactly 3.0 km from the Halls Gap-Dunkeld Rd intersection is an old gate on the weatern side of the road. Park here. Walk up the old tourist trail immediately on your right inside the gate and you'll come to the far righthand end of cliff (gets increasingly hard to follow but isn't too bad). 'Flay' is the obvious leaning crack to the right of the small caves as you arrive.

Ethic inherited from Grampians

Grampians access issues have emerged due to potential damage to the environment and cultural sites. Climbers need to be aware that there are significant Aboriginal sites in the Grampians, especially in cave areas. Leave no trace and treat everything with care.

The following is a basic list of things climbers in the Grampians need to be aware of. For more detailed information visit https://www.cliffcare.org.au/education

Climber’s Code

Find out about and observe access restrictions and agreements.

Use existing access tracks to minimise erosion - don’t create rock cairns or leave marking tape.

Do not disturb nesting birds or other wildlife.

Vegetation, even on cliff faces, is protected. Wire brushing to remove mosses and 'gardening' in cracks and gullies is not permitted. Use slings to protect trees while belaying or abseiling if belay anchors are not provided.

Large groups can create problems of crowding and excessive damage around cliffs. If you plan to take a group of ten or more people climbing, you are required to register to ensure there is space.

Respect sites of geological, cultural, or other scientific interest. Don't climb near Aboriginal sites

Vehicles must stay on roads open to the public; off-road driving is illegal.

Do not leave any rubbish - take it home with you.

Keep campsites clean.

Avoid all risk of fire - do not light campfires outside of official campground metal fire pits.

Dispose of human waste in a sanitary manner (bury, or even better pack it out) Do not pollute water supplies.

Respect established climbing traditions in ethical matters such as the use of chalk, pitons, bolts etc.

Avoid indiscriminate or excessive use of fixed equipment.

Responsible climbing will protect cliffs and ensure continued rockclimbing

Tags

Routes

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Grade Route

The obvious leaning crack to the right of the small caves when you first reach 'The Cheesecake'. Easy but definitely a few grades harder than 8. An alternate finish involves heading right and up the slab at the third cave, thereby avoiding the bushes.

A climb of considerable quality considering its location. The leader used a rest 4m below the belay, eliminated by the second. There is an abseil anchor on the ledge. This is also a better place to finish Harassed Tweed. Start at Harassed Tweed. Move up and left past a fixed wire to a rest, then step back right and continue straight up to belay ledge.

FA: Wayne Maher & Glen Donohue, 1994

Starts as for NLAS, but takes the faint RH crack. Traverse R through bulges up to small ledge on nose. Excellent sustained climbing up faint crack (accepts good small wires) leads up to ledge. Dicey direct start might be possible. Pitch 2 as for NLAS.

FA: Goshen Watts & Chris Leidy, 9 Mar 2014

Looks amazing? Particularly for the grade - very thin crack (wires & small friends) up an inspiring wall. Starts just around the nose of the East facing wall, about 30m left of flay.

  1. 30m, Crux. Delicately up bulges in middle of wall, trending left until it is possible to traverse right on black pockets into the crack. Great climbing up this to ledge below ceiling.

  2. Up to short L facing corner to roof, then step around R and climb chossy wall above - either finish through two noses, or belay beneath them and walk off right.

FA: Russell Crow, Allan Hope & Terry Tremble, 1983

An obvious corner/crack-line that climbs quite well, although a little loose on the top half. Up bulges as for NLAS, trending left to crack and L facing corner, which is followed to ledge. Do the 2nd pitch of NLAS (about 17) to top out.

Can rope traverse left to DRB on RRCC after first pitch.

FA: Chris Leidy & Goshen Watts, 9 Mar 2014

Start 3m left of Cream Cheese at the groove starting from a ledge, accessed from Old English gully. (The initial short corner was avoided because it was dirty and poorly protected, however, it was seconded.) Up the groove just left of the arête past natural pro and a bolt. Continue to the second bolt then step right onto the arête. Up a few metres to belay on a small ledge. Traverse off right into Cream Cheese and to the large ledge.

FA: Glen Donohue & Graeme Smith, 1994

Can descend from 1st pitch by rope traversing 5 metres to DRB above RRCC.

Makes the route independent of Cream Cheese. Start on the same ledge as Never Love A Stranger. Up left leaning crack into the wide crack of Handle With Care (where it traverses from Cream Cheese).

FA: Glen Donohue & Wayne Maher, 1994

Straight up centre of face, below RB, 2m left of 'Old English'. Take a few RPs. One RB at start, to rap off DRBs on the ledge. Doubled 50m rope reaches the ground.

FA: Ramon Francis & Dalen Court, 1998

Up 'Old English' for 2m, step right, climb centre of face to exit top right, on arête.

FA: Ramon Francis & Catherine Francis, 1998

FA: Jim Nelson Dick Curtis

On the wall R of Shadow Road there is a major crack line near the arete. The crack starts above a bulging lower wall. Start down and L of the crack.

  1. 18m [20] Up and R following awkward seams and ledges to the foot of the crack. Hanging belay.

  2. 32m [19] The crack to a good ledge on the R.

  3. 22m [17] Step out R and pick your way up the grooves to the final steep crack thru’ the top bulge.

FA: Richard Curtis 1, 2 & Jim Nelson 3, 1979

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