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Access: Climbing restrictions may apply

ACAV Note: Parks Victoria has advised that rock climbing restrictions may apply at certain locations. Formal advice has changed several times during 2019.

Please refer to the following link for PV's current advice:

https://parkweb.vic.gov.au/explore/parks/grampians-national-park/plans-and-projects/rock-climbing-faq

For a list of crags in SPA areas see:

https://savegrampiansclimbing.org/the-ban/closed-areas/

See warning details and discuss

Created about two years ago - Edited about a year ago

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Description

This is a semi-sport crag located below the 'Briggs Bluff' massif. The rock is steep orange sandstone walls with the occasional cave thrown in for good measure. Most of the better routes are grade 20+ and protected mainly by bolts.

The fixed equipment used on this cliff are either stainless steel expansion bolts or glue-in ringbolts. Most climbs have rap anchors to facilitate easy descent and cleaning. The first ascentionists have endeavored to camouflage fixed equipment by painting hangers and rings with matt textured paint. The first bolts on routes are usually relatively high off the deck so a stickclip is useful. Much of the rock is soft, so try and avoid climbing within 24 hours of recent rain. Routes such as 'Winged Corpse', 'Psychotic Episode' and 'Killer Wolf' are good wet weather routes. Black streaks on the rock are marks of water seepage which means these routes are not climbable after heavy rain.

A light rack of gear is required for many of the routes - a single set of cams and wires will suffice on all apart from 'Kublai Khan' and 'Stone Temptress'. There is still some potential for new lines to be done.

© (nmonteith)

Access issues inherited from Grampians

ACAV Note: Parks Victoria has advised that rock climbing restrictions may apply at certain locations. Formal advice has changed several times during 2019. Please refer to the following link for current and detailed advice: https://parkweb.vic.gov.au/explore/parks/grampians-national-park/plans-and-projects/rock-climbing-faq

Please note that due to the fact that the Grampians is a National Park, dogs and other pets are not allowed in the park except in vehicles on sealed roads and in sealed car parks. See http://m.parkweb.vic.gov.au/explore/parks/grampians-national-park/safety-and-regulations#overview

Approach

These cliffs are in the Mt Difficult Range (Nth Grampians), in 'Victoria'. From 'Melbourne' drive to Stawell and continue north towards Horshum for about 15 minutes, then take the well signposted road left to Roses Gap. If you drive past the Big Koala you have gone too far. Approx 10km down this road just before Roses Gap turn left down Roses Gap/Mt Zero Road (dirt) heading south for 1.2 km (24km north from Delley's Bridge in Halls Gap). Park on the side of the road near a large rock cairn. In the distance on the right is a low orange wall (Centurion) with a large grey wall above (Briggs Bluff). The upper wall has a large arch formation. Follow well cut track with some tape markers and rock cairns for about 15 minutes, walking through light scrub to arrive at the centre of the 'Lower Wall'.

If you want to camp the two best bets are the Fire Dam about 500m along Halls Gap/Mt Zero Rd from Roses Gap or Troopers Creek campsite (payment required) which is several kilometers west along Roses Gap Rd. You can also camp in a sheltered sandy cave to the right of 'Progressive Happy House' at the cliff.

© (nmonteith)

Ethic inherited from Grampians

Grampians access issues have emerged due to potential damage to the environment and cultural sites. Climbers need to be aware that there are significant Aboriginal sites in the Grampians, especially in cave areas. Leave no trace and treat everything with care.

The following is a basic list of things climbers in the Grampians need to be aware of. For more detailed information visit https://www.cliffcare.org.au/education

Climber’s Code

Find out about and observe access restrictions and agreements.

Use existing access tracks to minimise erosion - don’t create rock cairns or leave marking tape.

Do not disturb nesting birds or other wildlife.

Vegetation, even on cliff faces, is protected. Wire brushing to remove mosses and 'gardening' in cracks and gullies is not permitted. Use slings to protect trees while belaying or abseiling if belay anchors are not provided.

Large groups can create problems of crowding and excessive damage around cliffs. If you plan to take a group of ten or more people climbing, you are required to register to ensure there is space.

Respect sites of geological, cultural, or other scientific interest. Don't climb near Aboriginal sites

Vehicles must stay on roads open to the public; off-road driving is illegal.

Do not leave any rubbish - take it home with you.

Keep campsites clean.

Avoid all risk of fire - do not light campfires outside of official campground metal fire pits.

Dispose of human waste in a sanitary manner (bury, or even better pack it out) Do not pollute water supplies.

Respect established climbing traditions in ethical matters such as the use of chalk, pitons, bolts etc.

Avoid indiscriminate or excessive use of fixed equipment.

Responsible climbing will protect cliffs and ensure continued rockclimbing

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Some content has been provided under license from: © Australian Climbing Association Queensland (Creative Commons, Attribution, Share-Alike 2.5 AU)

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