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1. New South Wales and ACT 33,245 routes in Region

Summary:
J
F
M
A
M
J
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A
S
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D

Seasonality

Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -32.806142, 150.150172

access issues

If you have benefited from climbing infrastructure in NSW, please consider making a donation towards maintenance costs. The Sydney Rockclimbing Club Rebolting Fund finances the replacement of old bolts on existing climbs and the maintenance of other hardware such as fixed ropes and anchors. The SRC purchases hardware, such as bolts and glue, and distributes them to volunteer rebolters across the state of New South Wales. For more information, including donation details, visit https://sydneyrockies.org.au/rebolting/

1.1. Northern Rivers 343 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -28.963259, 153.073030

description

The Northern Rivers region of Northern NSW

1.1.1. Urbenville 152 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -28.507652, 152.531220

summary

An area providing a number of different crags, each with their own unique style, from steep thuggery to delicate friction slab.

description

Sleepy Urbenville, best known for a place to ride dirtbikes could be transforming into the Catalunya of Queensland. And even though it's not in Queensland, we've adopted it.

access issues

For access to The Crown, Crossroads and Spot X only (Not for Battery Hill or Vesuvius: It is requested (by the farmer whose land you cross to access the cliff) that you phone him prior to your arrival and seek permission to access The Crown. His name is Mr Jones and his number is (02) 6634 1225. Think of this as a courtesy call which will serve to keep climbers in the good graces of land managers. Please do it. If you should have any problems with this arrangement, post up on qurank.com.

approach

Urbenville is in NSW, 150 km south of Brisbane via Beaudesert. Turn R to Rathdowney at the traffic lights in Beaudesert. Through Rathdowney and past spectacular mountain scenery. 'Campbell's Folly', the cliffline just past Palen Creek is particularly awesome-looking, although it resides on private property and is largely chossy. Drive on past Mt Lindsay and into NSW. At Woodenbong, turn L to Tabulam on McPherson Street. It is about 13 km to Urbenville.

where to stay

Option 1: There is a basic campground at the northern entrance to Urbenville set amongst huge pine trees. The camp hosts are Tony/Kelly Jo who volunteer to maintain the site run by Forestry. The cost is $10/night with warm showers. You can reach Tony on (02) 6634 1424 and pick up shower keys at the local store. It is recommended you bring your own water.

Option 2: If you plan to climb at Battery Hill or Vesuvius, there is a campsite south of Urbenville, where it's an easy walk to The Pines. It's called Tooloom Falls Camp Grounds (see Google Maps or directions under Battery Hill section).

Option 3: It's possible to get a room in the Urbenville pub for about $30 a night.

1.1.2. Mt. Warning Wollumbin Shield 13 routes in Crag

Summary:
Rock climbing, Trad climbing and Aid climbing

Lat / Long: -28.402196, 153.263911

description

Mount Warning is a mountain in the Tweed Range in the Northern Rivers Region of NSW. It is very close to the border between NSW and Queensland. It stands at 1159 metres above sea level.

access issues

It is located in Wollumbin National Park.

approach

Mount Warning is accessible by the Summit Track hiking trail, which leads up the mountain to the summit.

1.1.3. Tweed Valley 1 route in Crag

Summary:
All Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -28.286091, 153.329274

1.1.4. Old Lismore Quarry 10 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -28.793621, 153.262965

1.1.5. Angel Way 12 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

summary

climbing is banned in these areas... keep climbing gear in your pack.

description

Rock is crumbly

access issues

access difficult.

1.1.6. Lillian Rock 0 routes in Crag

description

Lillian Rock is a 317 metre high mountain in the Northern Rivers region of Northeast New South Wales.

approach

Lillian Rock is accessible by car via Lillian Rock Road.

1.1.7. Island Quarry 3 routes in Crag

Summary:
Rock climbing and Top roping

Lat / Long: -28.638788, 153.573690

summary

This crag is located on private land. Climbing here is illegal now as it is a community arts and eco centre.

access issues

Climbing is banned here.

where to stay

Byron Bay

1.1.8. Rainbow Rock 16 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -28.512089, 153.324141

summary

Private Property

description

Helmet and brush needed at this crag. Holds appear and disappear often. Needs lots of cleaning. Lots of ticks, march flies, mosquitoes and leeches.

access issues

Across farmers land - must ask permission - private property.

approach

Call for details and directions... walk up hill. Very steep at the end. Hard to find.

ethic

Sensitive area. Private Property. Permission for climbing or bolting required.

history

Called Rainbow Rock. First climbs established in 2000 by the owner of Wave Rock, Byron Bay (John Reilly)

1.1.9. Zen 15 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -28.451898, 152.668754

1.1.10. Boonoo Boonoo Falls 3 routes in Crag

Summary:
Rock climbing and Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -28.800954, 152.163074

description

Pronounced Bunna Boonoo. Boonoo Boonoo Falls is a spectacular waterfall located in Boonoo Boonoo National Park near Tenterfield in the Northern Rivers Region of Northern NSW.

© (gremlin)

access issues

Located in Boonoo Boonoo National Park.

© (gremlin)

where to stay

Camping is available at Cypress-Pine Campground in Boonoo Boonoo National Park.

© (gremlin)

1.1.11. Surf Rock 26 routes in Crag

Summary:
Top roping, Trad climbing and Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -28.336125, 153.577362

summary

sea cliff, windy. Some loose rock, helmet is a good idea, Some very sharp rock!!! cut though my 11mm rope when top roping an overhang. Use rope protectors over all edges. Most rock is pretty average.

description

Mostly Trad climbing.Sea cliff climbing, beautiful location. good surf. A place to climb when on the north coast of NSW... Better than nothing... If you dont like the climbs... go Surfing...

approach

Cabarita Beach - Headland... NSW. follow trail out to headland, when on wooden boardwalk climb over fence and head to right side of headland. there are 2 decent gullys, first climbs are in first gully.

where to stay

Cabarita has lots of accomadation.

ethic

Using carrots to bolt, they are least noticeable. Headland is public location. Minimal impact to environment is required here.

history

Found a bolted climb with a chain anchor... Most climbs are probably easier than graded. Grading is my best guess... feel free to adjust grades...

1.1.12. Lighthouse beach 92 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -28.867943, 153.592400

summary

Sun surf sand and bouldering.

description

Small outcrop on the headland with around 80 problems on volcanic basalt rock that is on the most part quite compact. Right on the beach with some sandy landings near the surf club end (southern). The remainder is rocky landings, but a good spot and a crash pad will definitely help. Nice holiday bouldering good fun easy moves that in places get a touch high off the ground. Salt spray can sometimes make walking around base very slippery and is best avoided around times of large swells! Sand levels change often by as much as a metre.

approach

North end of lighthouse beach Ballina. Park at the beach or ontop of crag at lookout. Climb, surf and swim at the beach. Grab a coffee/breakfast at the club house.

history

Seems like the kind of spot that would of attracted climbers at some point. Who knows the history? Just putting up whats been done by a few people over the past few years.

1.2. Mid North Coast 882 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -31.149465, 152.568243

1.2.1. Coffs Harbour 624 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad climbing, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -30.188363, 153.016657

summary

The Glenreagh area (about 45 minutes NW of Coffs Harbour) offers an extensive sandstone escarpment with more than ten established crags and a variety of climbs from cracks to steep sport routes.

description

Although the area is described as 'Coffs Harbour', the majority of the climbing is located near the town of Glenreagh, 45 mins North West of Coffs.

The Glenreagh area offers an extensive sandstone escarpment with more than ten established crags. A summary of the crags is provided in the 'Glenreagh' subsection.

The Coffs Harbour area also includes a climbing area in the Nymboida Gorge, a remote, adventurous, multipitch, granite climbing area that has a challenging walk-in approach or can be accessed by paddling a renowned whitewater river. All of the routes are considered fairly serious undertakings requiring a full rack of traditional gear. The routes are up to 180m in length.

Boambee Headland is near Sawtell. A small cliff offers some bouldering traverses.

Coffs Harbour makes a great destination for combining climbing with a coastal holiday and it is possible to climb in the area year-round (by chasing shaded cliffs). The best temperatures are from about March to October.

approach

Half way between Sydney and Brisbane. Most of the crags are only about half an hour west of the Pacific Highway.

where to stay

The nearest bush camping is at the parking lot for Wonderland. Otherwise, the towns of Coffs Harbour, Woolgoolga or any of the other coastal villages offer everything from caravan parks and backpackers hostels to five star resorts. The ability to combine a combine climbing with a beach holiday is hard to beat.

ethic

Climbing ethics in the Coffs Harbour area generally follow those of the rest of Australia. The sandstone often offers solid, natural protection which should be used instead of fixed protection where possible. Tape, ribbon, or something similar tied around a bolt or inserted in the route will indicate an incomplete route. Please respect these routes as projects until the marker is removed.

1.2.2. Valla beach headland 3 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -30.593852, 153.013884

description

A tiny little cave of decent quality rock amid a cliff of choss. Would be a great little distraction on a road trip just a few minutes of the pacific highway. Only a couple routes but scope for lots of elimination problems.

approach

From the pacific highway drive down Valla beach road all the way to the beach, park at the lookout car park, walk left (north) along the beach for ~100m.

history

??? TBA

1.2.3. Middle Head 26 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -30.778824, 152.996908

summary

Ideallic location with bullet hard black rock overlooking beautiful sandy white beach.

description

Multiple areas including the caves, Carpe Diem and more. The cave area is only accessible at low-tide, we were gonna name it the lowtai wall.

access issues

This is a nudist beach area quite popular with mature males, please respect their space. The cave sector is accessible only at low tide.

approach

About 50m south of Middle Head Trail on Grassy head Trail, park and head to the beach, and walk southwards towards the rock outcrops. Carpe Diem wall is best accessed at the carpark south of the headland.

history

May have been an old climbing area? We don't know, but came across it last year after scouring the area hungry for rock. Rock outcrops

1.2.4. Grassy Head 15 routes in Area

Summary:
Bouldering and Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -30.794094, 153.002025

summary

A rocky headland with a great view, interesting features and scope for plenty of climbing and bouldering. Rock quality varies from solid bands to chossy, friable, actively eroding overhangs.

description

Probably best climbed in good weather with low wave action. While the rocky platform provides a good flat landing many of the routes here are high-ball climbs and extreme care should be taken when bouldering or descending. Pads and/or ropes are advised.

access issues

Park at the visitors parking in Grassy Head Holiday Park and walk to headland via trail or beach.

approach

There's a walking track over the grassy headland or you can rock hop from the southern end of the beach.

ethic

This area is frequented by locals, fishermen and tourists alike. While much of the rock here is solid there is also a fair amount of actively eroding rock, particularly the overhangs at the righthand end of Rock Band Wall. Grassy Head may be a culturally sensitive area. Please be respectful when climbing here and avoid unnecessarily damaging rock. http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/nswcultureheritage/grassyheads.htm

history

Unknown.

1.2.5. South West Rocks 177 routes in Area

Summary:
Mostly Bouldering

Lat / Long: -30.973991, 153.060911

summary

Quality granite bouldering in a stunning setting by the ocean with hundreds of problems.

description

South West Rocks is a small tourist town with a historic gaol on the headland at nearby Arakoon (Trial Bay). Surfing, boating, fishing, scuba diving and spear fishing are some of the activities that are popular in the region. Some great hiking can also be found along the headlands. The best time to visit for climbing is winter when it's not so hot and busy, plus this brings income to the town in the off season.

access issues

The area is part of the Arakoon National Park and should be treated as such - respect the rules of the park.

approach

South West Rocks is roughly halfway between Sydney and Brisbane just off the Pacific Hwy. From South West Rocks follow signs to Arakoon and Trial Bay Goal.

where to stay

South West Rocks is mostly a retirement and tourist town. There are a large number of holiday rentals on offer and a few campgrounds at SWR and Arakoon. Can be very busy in peak holiday times!

ethic

Minimal chalk usage and no tick marks. Remember you are sharing park with other users. Be respectful. Clean up after yourself and other!

history

Climbing here started in August 1995 when a few trad lines were done by Anthony Alexander. This was shortly followed by Bouldering which is now the more dominate type of climbing done here.

1.2.6. Crowdy Bay 12 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering and Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -31.724621, 152.798577

summary

Seaside climbing in a rather scenic national park.

description

Seaside climbing in a rather scenic national park. While only easy access areas have currently been climbed, there is potential on the many headlands south of Crowdy Bay campground.

access issues

The area is in Crowdy Bay National Park so the usual sensitivities apply. Keep a low profile, and clean up after yourselves.

approach

Use google maps with Crowdy Bay Campground, NSW as your destination. The following link contains directions from Port Macquarie (the closest major town) to Crowdy Bay:

https://www.google.com.au/maps/dir/-31.7194386,152.7931612/Port+Macquarie,+New+South+Wales+2444/@-31.5759088,152.6796784,11z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m9!4m8!1m0!1m5!1m1!1s0x6b9dff5c34ecc9c1:0x50609b490442e40!2m2!1d152.9!2d-31.433333!3e0

where to stay

Crowdy Bay Campground is the most convenient location. There are also plenty of motels and hotels at the nearby towns of Laurieton, West Haven, and Lakewood.

1.2.7. Boomerang 21 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -32.335943, 152.549920

summary

Easy slabbing or extreme adventure.

description

Boomerang beach has 2 climbing areas to the North of the beach. Each of the areas varies in style and rock type. There is plenty to keep you interested here if you are up here on holiday and want a break from the beach.

approach

Park in the car park on the Northern end of Boomerang Beach, from here look to your left and you will see a rocky headland with a nice slab of black rock. You can see one of the areas from here and the others are in the zawn on the other side of this headland.

history

The original Boomerang Beach slab routes must have been done some time around 1980.

1.2.8. Burgess beach 4 routes in Area

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -32.199989, 152.542500

summary

Boulder and swim!

description

Small beach near Forster framed with rocky outcrops. Some rock is a bit chossy but it tends to be the lighter orange stuff. Keep to the sometimes sharp, dark rock and you will be fine. The Best rock is in the middle and southern end of the beach. Feel free to edit the location of these boulders as i am relying on my memory of the area. http://www.greatlakes.org.au/outdoors/beaches/burgess-beach

approach

Off the lakes way, easiest way is to turn into Kularoo dr and follow that right through to Lakeview cres.. turn left and then the first right is burgess road. As you come down the hill the car park is on your left.

1.2.9. Centre Of Gravity Indoor Adventure Centre 0 routes in Gym

description

http://www.centreofgravity.com.au/

52 Jindalee Rd, Port Macquarie, New South Wales 2444

1.3. Hunter Valley 2,082 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -32.246689, 151.416130

description

Whether it's bouldering, sport, trad or DWS climbing the Hunter Region has something for everyone. The region covers the Watagans to the west, Central Coast to the south, Bulahdelah to the north and Port Stephens to the East. The Watagans is made up of numerous sandstone cliffs in a National park. Port Stephens has some fantastic sea cliff climbing on quality granite like rock. Bulahdelah is made up of an alum/rhyolite rock. This rock is very stong and lends itself to some interesting featured climbing, inclucing the famous cave. The Central Coast has fine, compacted sandstone with some great sport climbing caves and bouldering areas. Also has some great trad spots along the Hawksbury. For more information see the Hunter Valley Rockclimbing guidebook.

1.3.1. Watagans 561 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad climbing, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -32.987905, 151.414682

description

The Watagans are comprised of a number sandstone cliffs. West of the M1 (Newcastle to Sydney) Freeway, the area is mainly National Park though some sections are in State Forests or on private property. The rock is softer and has more conglomerate bands than Sydney or Blue Mountains sandstones, but if you stick to the worn classic you should enjoy.

Monkey Face is the main area. It is a good place for beginners and is easy to set top ropes. It is often used by the Scouts and the Newcastle University Mountaineering Club.

history

Early climbing dates from the late 1950s and early 1960s at the Dora Pinnacles. Most climbing up to the early 1980s was club based, the most prominent being the Newcastle and Hunter Areas Scout Association, Newcastle University Mountaineering Club (NUMC), Avondale Bushwalking and Rockclimbing Club (ABARC) and the Newcastle Bushwalking Club (NBC).

1.3.2. Port Stephens 704 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -32.744061, 152.113287

description

Port Stephens climbing is on fine seaside granite. Most areas require trad gear but there are a few smaller sport crags thrown in. It is a great place to spend a summers day go for a climb and cool off with a swim. Port Stephens also offers a number of DWS crags.

1.3.3. Bulahdelah 414 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -32.411859, 152.223264

summary

A sign banning rock climbing in the state forest (pretty much everything south of the lookout ) has appeared in late December 2014. And the north area is on private property.

description

Bring loads of tape. The rock here is as hard as nails... and as sharp as them too. Loads of climbing to be had in all different styles. Almost every pinnacle, butress and wall has been bolted and there are loads of quality climbs to test yourself on.

The rock can feel quite soapy and can be a bit difficult to read causing climbers to look like they are "washing windows" looking for holds.

There are new routes going up all the time and it is important to respect the bolters and keep of all tatted routes.

access issues

Major access issues in all areas at present. Walking through the state forest is fine but DO NOT CLIMB south of the lookout. Permission has been granted by the new landholders to climb on the northern part of the cliffs. This includes the Beehive, Fiegs overhang and the Cave. However getting there is tricky. A landowner to the north is alleging climbers have damaged his property. Do not cross at the water reservoir or trespass on the northwest side of the ridge. Parking down near the golf course, then skirting the southern boundary of the golf course will keep you on the land we have permission to access. Hopefully a map of this will appear soon.

where to stay

Buladelah has several motels, cheap but basic rooms at the hotel, and a camping ground. Camping also possible in nearby Myall Lakes national park.

ethic

If you intend to bolt then it is best to speak to the locals as they will inform you of the do's and don'ts of bolting in the area.

history

First recorded climbs date from 1980, therehas had a steady stream of routes added ever since, most notably by John Wilde and Vanessa Wills.

1.3.4. Newcastle 355 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -32.949111, 151.738355

description

Newcastle is a harbour city with a population of approximately 310,000 people. It is located 162 kilometres North East of Sydney and is on the NSW Central Coast.

approach

Newcastle is easily accessible by car via major highways.

where to stay

There are many accommodation options in Newcastle, ranging from camping to luxury hotels.

1.3.5. Upper Hunter 32 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Top roping and other styles

Lat / Long: -32.238508, 151.186137

1.3.6. Gloucester 16 routes in Region

Summary:
All Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -32.020136, 151.924570

description

Gloucester is a town in dairy and beef cattle country on the New South Wales Mid North Coast. Gloucester has a population of approximately 2300 people.

approach

Gloucester is easily accessible by car via either Thunderbolts Way or Bucketts Way.

1.4. Northern Tablelands 2,791 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -29.863498, 151.715021

summary

World class granite bouldering, epic gorges, decades of trad history and plenty of sport to go round

1.4.1. Stonehenge 86 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -29.797007, 151.738527

summary

Park right next to the problem you're working

description

Stonehenge is a great bouldering spot with 70+ routes on some great shaped rocks. The rock is typical New England granite with lots of crimps, flakes and great friction. And where else can you park right next to the problem you're working?

The area is a recreation area complete with picnic area, barbecues, footy pitch, washrooms, water and a rifle range.

approach

Stonehenge is about an hours drive north of Armidale and about 5 minutes south of Glen Innes. It is 700 hundred meters north of 'Balancing Rock' which is sign posted.

history

Even though stonehenge has seen active bouldering for some time a lot of history isn't recorded so any feedback on history, routes, names and grades would be greatly appreciated!

1.4.2. Dangars Gorge 54 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad climbing, Deep water soloing and Aid climbing

Lat / Long: -30.681797, 151.743183

1.4.3. Gara Gorge 989 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -30.622020, 151.822325

description

All the cliffs on the Gara gorge 15 minutes from Armidale.

1.4.4. Bakers Creek 64 routes in Crag

Summary:
Bouldering and Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -30.548840, 151.891320

summary

A strange mix of old-school trad routes on the walls around the falls and modern bouldering in the creek bed. Fine grained granite, large boulders

description

Deep gorge not far from Armidale, off Waterfall Way. Old neglected trad climbs with bouldering at their base. Perhaps 20 boulder problems established so far, with scope for more, and potential for bolted and naturally protected climbs as well. Access is steep and difficult, straight off the lookout.

access issues

From Armidale head east on the waterfall way for 20kms, then right at the sign post, onto dirt for a couple kms.

approach

From the lookout, jump the fence on the right and follow a faint track down to the right. Caution must be taken walking in as the decent is very steep. As you approach there is a promising looking boulder that you soon realize is the size of a house. Most established boulder problems are downstream of this (problem 'High times and down beats' is upstream of the giant block and 'One too many' sits against it), but future problems exist right through the gorge from the waterfall downstream.

history

Bob Harden and Doug McLean formed a climbing group called the Delta Club, a breakaway group from the University Of New England Mountaineering Club (UNEMC). Starts of climbs were marked with a Delta instead of the usual square. Some of these markings were still visible at Bakers Creek in the early seventies but have since been worn away. Two climbs were put up in 1964 by Harden and McLean. They are Bakercide (6) and Nitrocide(8).1967 produced only two new ones, Hardicide (14) by Thomas and the tricky Speleocide (12) by B.Douglas. Mills pioneered two new ones in 1969, the best being Klettercide (12). 1971 produced five, the best being Pissed Psychedelic Peanut (15) by A.Suters and Cornelius Corners (15) by Rob Dixon. In 1980, Austin Legler with Greg (Dulux) Pritchard did Basilisk (16). 1981 saw Al Stephens climb White Man’s Burden (20) with Clark and in 1985, Stephens made another brief visit to establish Cheesy Gland (20), a variant finish to Cornelius Corners. In 1986 Stephens with Larry Dixon eliminated all aid on ADP, now 21.

This history was documented in 'Waterfalls-A Rock climbers guide to the waterfalls of New England' by Al Stephens (1996).

After years of neglect, the area received a second wind after Artie Schultz heard from Rick Curtis that a few trad lines had been done there but no record of them existed (oh yes they did and now they are in this guide...). The new generation was after quality bouldering and it seems they found some.

1.4.5. Four Mile Creek Falls 4 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -30.570055, 151.938096

approach

Take the Grafton / Dorrigo road for 25km and turn right to Hillgrove. Near the old post Office pick up the Long Point Rd. and follow this for 5.9km until you cross a concrete bridge over Four Mile Creek, then turn right over a grid into private property. (Permission MUST be obtained from the property owners. Please don’t arrive before 9:00am. Farmers sometimes sleep-in.) Follow the track for about 1km from the homestead until just over the creek and park before the gate. Follow the creek down for a kilometre to the gorge. To enter the gorge walk one km. down the left side to a gully or abseil in down the right-hand side.

The climbs are described from left of the waterfall, around to right of the waterfall. The first climb described here is Skylite.

1.4.6. Wollomombi Falls 7 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad climbing, Sport climbing and Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -30.533920, 152.040002

summary

One of the most spectacular gorge systems in Australia. Long, serious, chossy adventure climbing in a remote setting.

description

Wollomombi falls was once believed to be the tallest waterfall in Australia. However, geographical revisions place them at second or third tallest, depending on the source. Regardless, the gorge is very spectacular with many sheer faces. Unfortunately, the quality of the metamorphosed mudstone deteriorates very quickly as you move away from the stream.

Activities around the gorge including hiking trails or canyoning trips down Wollomombi or Chandler Falls and continuing downstream thorugh a steep sieded canyon known as the 'Inaccessible Gulf'. The valley widens about 4km downstream of the falls. The upper reaches of the gorge should be avoided when water levels are high.

approach

The falls are near the tiny village of Wollomombi, about 40km. east of Armidale off the Grafton/Dorrigo Road (Waterfall Way). They are well signposted. Park at the car park/picnic area. Getting into the gorge is not easy. You can either abseil down the Wollomombi Falls Rap Route or scramble down into the gorge. The recommended scrambling route into the gorge requires no abseils but it is loose and dangerous. From the car park walk 100m towards the falls where there is a long grassy platform slightly below the rim of the gorge. At the far-left end of the platform is a gully and rib. Stick to the very loose rib. Stay on the rib, making a few detours around minor obstacles, until you pass a huge landslip on your left and finally reach a small saddle. The spur bluffs out beyond the next high point beyond the saddle. From the saddle, move down right, until you arrive at a steep, slippery watercourse. A scrubby steep spur to the right of the watercourse avoids the steep section in the gully. Once below this section continue on down the watercourse until you arrive at another steep section close to the gorge floor. From here move left into bushes and scree, down to the gorge floor. If you get lost you will have to abseil. Walk up the left-hand river past the junction to the base of the falls. If you are doing the Ridge, go straight up between the two rivers from the junction.

where to stay

There is a National Park campground at the falls.

ethic

Old School.

history

1960's

Rock climbing in the Armidale district is believed to have commenced around 1960 at Dangars Falls. Two climbers, John (Action) Lindsay and Hugh Spencer, at that time, climbed the waterfall face right of the water-course. This is of course the climb known today as Action. At the same time it is believed that they also climbed the orange pinnacle right of Action.

Looking for other great challenges, in 1961 Lindsay and party attempted and completed the first ascent of the Wollomombi-Chandler Ridge. Obviously other members of the Mountaineering Club thought they were a little crazy, as none of these climbs were recorded. No doubt Lindsay and others attempted/completed other climbs but unfortunately no records were kept.

The first recorded climbs were completed in 1964.

Bob Harden and Doug McLean formed a climbing group called the Delta Club, a breakaway group from the University Of New England Mountaineering Club (UNEMC). Starts of climbs were marked with a Delta instead of the usual square. Some of these markings were still visible at Bakers Creek in the early seventies but have since been worn away. Two climbs were put up in 1964 by Harden and McLean. They are Bakercide (6) and Nitrocide(8), both at Bakers Creek. 1965 saw the Delta club leap into action. John Davis and Mike Thomas joined Harden and McLean.

Apart from climbing at Bakers Creek, the group make excursions to Mihi Falls and Dangars Falls. Five new climbs were put up at Bakers Creek. The best being Davicide(13) by Davis, Punjacide(13) by I.Logan and the two aid climbs, ADP(M1) and ryocide(M1), both by Harden. Three climbs were completed at Mihi- the best being the classic Pull Up(15) by Davis. During the same year they made their first visit onto the big, scary wall of Dangars Falls. Harden put up the very run-out Toecap(13), while Davis climbed Goldfinger(16), a climb that hasn’t, at the time of writing this guide, had a second ascent !

In 1966 McLean with Dave Mills repeated Lindsay’s route, giving it the name Action (14), while the best route at Bakers Creek was Normacide (11) by Mills.

1967 produced only two new ones at Bakers Creek. Hardicide (14) by Thomas and the tricky Speleocide (12) by B.Douglas.

The only new route in 1968 was at Dangars, Nightcap (12) by Thomas.

Mills pioneered two new ones at Bakers Creek in 1969. The best being Klettercide (12). Noel Beynon with J.Street had a close look at the rock around Wollomombi Falls. They found and climbed Dono Dedit (8) During this year the Wollomombi-Chandler Ridge became a popular trip. Elaine Cantrill (Elaine’s Gorge-a canyon- is named after her) arrived on the scene, and swinging leads with R.Jones, put up the long Magnificent Obsession (9) on Oaky Falls. The same pair did the first route at Four Mile Creek Falls, Skylite (6).

1970's

The only new route in 1970 was Drednought (14) at Dangars Falls by N.Hughes and Beynon. This takes the corner right of Action and left of the Orange Pillar. Today it is quite loose and probably was then.

1971 produced eight climbs. Five at Bakers Creek- the best being Pissed Psychedelic Peanut (15) by A.Suters and Cornelius Corners (15) by Rob Dixon. Hughes and Beynon found the chossiest route in New England at Wollomombi Falls. It goes up a slabby wall onto the Wollomombi-Chandler Ridge, opposite the falls. It is appropriately titled Violet Crumble Bar (13). J.Street with Dick Gallimore did We Are Not Amused(12), the chimney next to the falls at Four Mile Creek Falls, while R.Jones with Gallimore did Nuttinge (14) at the same crag.

1974 saw Phil Prior arrive, and with Jill Kelman put up a direct start to Nightcap, which they named Copperhead (12). Rob Dixon dragged Bob Killip and Brian Birchall to Mihi to do Deception(14). Prior, at Bakers Creek, disappeared into the mank just downstream of Bakers Creek Falls, to produce Frigid Air (6).

In 1975, Al Stephens with Dixon added the first four pitches to We Are Not Amused (12) at Four Mile Creek Falls. At the same location Killip with Rob Stazewski completed The Killip-Stazewski Route On The East Face Of Four Mile (20). At Mihi Dixon, with Stephens, did Bird On A Wire (16). In 1978, a granite cliff,Flaky Buttress, downstream from Dangars, was discovered by Bob Killip. The result was Plain Sailing (14).

1980's

Dangars received two new ones in 1980. Stephens with Geoff Francis did the multi-pitch Slippery When Wet (13) during a drought, while on the opposite wall Birchall with Francis did Caprice (17). At Bakers Creek Austin Legler with Greg (Dulux) Pritchard did Basilisk (16). Back at Flaky Buttress (Dangars) Jack Lattanzio, with Ed Sharp, warmed up on Fairy Choss (8), and later that year returned with Mark Colyvan to complete Mystery Achievement (20).

1981 saw Dangars Falls yield Total Control (20) by Bayne and Colyvan, as well as Foolscap (18) by Birchall. Downstream, past Flaky Buttress Stephens and Rob Clark found The Richard Cliff and put up three great climbs, the best being Eavesdropper (19) by Stephens and Airs and Graces (19) by Clark. Stephens with Sharp had a Calculated Thrill (16) at Mihi after he did White Man’s Burden (20) with Clark at Bakers Creek. Near The Richard Cliff Pritchard found The Pritchard Cliff and soloed the only route to date, Pariah (5).

In 1982 Paul Bayne found another crag, Dynomight Buttress, near (before ?) Flaky Buttress. No one has been able to locate it since. At Flaky Buttress Stephens put up the great Bombora (20 M1). Bayne managed to eliminated most of the aid but left the grade the same. On Richard Cliff, the next crag down the gorge, Bayne with Stephens, did the powerful Lackluster Backbuster (23).

In 1985, Stephens made a brief visit to Bakers Ck. to establish Cheesy Gland (20), a variant finish to Cornelius Corners.

At Bakers Ck. in 1986 Stephens with Larry Dixon eliminated all aid on ADP, now 21.

1990's

No new routes were put up on or around any of the falls from 1986 until the drought of 1993 when Wollomombi Falls were completely dry! Ben Christian and Stephens did After the Rain (18). The drought continued in 1994 and once again Wollomombi Falls dried up. This time Gordon Low and Stephens with Tim Hill completed a line parallel to After the Rain, called God’s Of Thunder (18).

Most of this guide and the history was documented in 'Waterfalls-A Rock climbers guide to the waterfalls of New England' by Al Stephens (1996)

1.4.7. Cathedral Rock National Park 86 routes in Crag

Summary:
Bouldering, Trad climbing and Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -30.439276, 152.231590

1.4.8. Ebor Gorge 188 routes in Crag

Access: Ebor has been burnt out

Some tracks are still closed and the lookouts have not yet been rebuilt but the park is open.

https://www.facebook.com/kyle.donoghue.31/posts/996826224006784

See warning details and discuss

Created about a year ago - Edited 10 weeks ago
Summary:
Mostly Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -30.402257, 152.339352

summary

Lots of crack and aretes

description

Ebor Falls is part of Guy Fawkes River National Park. All the cliffs are in the National park as is the access to these areas and should thus be treated accordingly. Enough said!

Ebor is a township 77km east of Armidale on the Dorrigo road. The climbing area is just before the town on the Armidale side of the Guy Fawkes river on the cliffs around the falls.

The cliffs consist of short vertical basalt columns (10m - 20m) and virtually all the climbs are sustained cracks of varying size between the columns. The original climbing areas are called ‘Breakaways’ and are numbered 1 to 6 with the first being closest to the falls and the sixth being furthest from the falls.

The more recently developed cliffs have broken with tradition and been given more exotic names so that the very short ‘Dead Heroes Buttress’ is between the 4th and 5th Breakaways, ‘Solid Gold Buttress’ is directly below the left-hand end of the 4th Breakaway and ‘Pub Buttress’ and ‘Bondage Buttress’ are on the other side of the gorge.

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access issues

National Park

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approach

Take the Dorrigo road out of Armidale until just before the township of Ebor there is a sign posted road to Ebor falls on your left. Take this road past the graveyard to the first car park (on your right); park here for access to the 1st and 2nd Breakaways, and drive further on to the main car park and picnic area for access to the 3rd - 6th Breakaways, ‘Dead Heroes Buttress’ and ‘Solid Gold Buttress’. To access ‘Pub Buttress’ and ‘Bondage Buttress’ walk across the top of the First Falls and then proceed to the gorge rim on that side of the river.

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where to stay

Camping at the Ebor Falls rest area is banned but you can camp nearby at the Native Dog camping ground. To get there drive west towards Guyra for 12kms. It is part of Cathedral Rock National Park and camp fees apply. It is only an hour’s drive from Armidale so you can easily stay there. There are also an amazing variety of hotels, bed n’ breakfasts, pubs and caravan parks in Armidale.

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ethic

Basically, the climbers of Armidale are a prettylaid back, free thinking group and as long as you don’t go out of your way to put people’s noses out of joint you’ll be amazed at how helpful they can be. The quickest way to piss people off is by ripping off projects. There are a few devoted locals making an effort and putting up quality new climbs. A lot of time, hard work and even money goes into their endeavours (cracks can be projects too) and there is too much unclimbed rock around to justify destroying someone else’s motivation. Any routes marked as such or not in the guide should be left alone. The simple courtesy of asking first may save you from being stripped naked and being staked out for the crows to pick your eyes out.

If putting up new routes is your thing then please feel free. However bolting in National Parks is actually illegal and as Ebor is mostly crack climbs there is rarely a need for bolts.

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history

Ebor holds a rather special place in the history of New England climbing. Due to its pleasant nature, easy access and short well protected climbs it has been an ideal training area where many Armidale climbers have ‘pushed their grades and tested themselves on such classics as ‘Rooflet’ 19, ‘Backdoor Man’ 19, ‘Sleight of Hand’ 19, and ‘Luce’ 21, and as little as about 6 years ago an ascent of any of these test pieces signified your ‘arrival’ into the upper echelon of New England climbers. On the other hand Ebor has broken a lot of hearts. Almost everyone who has climbed there has had at least one of those days when the climbs cease to be inanimate crack lines and become vicious and spiteful beasts, hell bent on seeing you lying on your back on the ground with blood streaming out of your ears. On one such day (in May 1983) after falling off ‘Anxiety Attack’ a few times Paul Colyvan (Animal) in a fit of rage hitchhiked back to Armidale rather than spend a minute longer at the cliff waiting for everyone else to drive back.

Given the extremes of feeling for the place, which is so much a part of the character of the cliff, it is not surprising that the cliff drifts in and out of fashion from time to time. It always manages to attract a few visitors though, even in recent times, when it has been largely overlooked due to its lack of bolt protected wall climbs which are fashionable at present. Considering this lack of interest in recent years it is remarkable that some of New England’s hardest routes are at Ebor, in fact Ebor has always been well represented in the upper grades at any particular point in time and was often the scene of the first climb at a particular grade right from the time of its discovery as a climbing area.

1974

Anyway, the story begins in April 1974, when local, @bobkillip, records the first climb at Ebor on the Third Breakaway, ‘Luce’ 17M1, a thin crack that was aided to a roof which went free. Ironically now that the route is free at 21 the roof is considered about 19 (and some even insist that the roof is the crux). Shortly after that Jill Kelman and Al Stephens also did ‘Haggis Hole’ 13, also on the third breakaway, which was the only other route recorded at Ebor that year, despite Killip’s enthusiasm for the place. In reality Killip would have been climbing near his limit on most climbs at Ebor, since 17 was the highest grade in New England at the time, and no one else was capable of climbing at that standard. So it’s not surprising that development was slow at first, however, the interest was there and it prompted New England climbers to get into crack climbing, a trend which wouldn’t change significantly for nearly 10 years.

1975

In March the following year Killip returned to do ‘Frogwyn D’Harder’ 18 also on the third breakaway, which was New England’s first 18 (although now it is considered 19!). Before that however Al Stephens and Rob Dixon recorded the first route on the first breakaway in February with ‘Supermouse’ M2 and went on to do a few others on the same breakaway as the year progressed, the best of which is probably ‘The Joker’ 17 led by Dixon. Dixon along with mature age novice Brian Birchall and visiting Queenslander Trevor Gynther also added the first route on the second breakaway with ‘Chunder Chimney’ 12. Also of note from 1975 was Stephens’ route ‘Sundown’ M2 which made the first use of bolts on a climb (for aid) in New England. By the end of 1975 there were still only a total of 13 routes recorded at Ebor. In 1976 Richard Curtis arrived in Armidale and he, like Killip, was keen on hard jam cracks and provided a bit of healthy and friendly competition for Killip, who had dominated Armidale’s hard climbing scene for the past few years. Curtis was particularly keen on Ebor where he added many fine new routes, but the other important thing he was to do was to provide encouragement for Brian Birchall who improved dramatically and also acquired a taste for hard jam cracks such as those found at Ebor. The two teamed up for many first ascents at Ebor and elsewhere such as Kaputar and Gara gorge, although the newly discovered Gara granite areas where neglected somewhat in 1976 for the sake of Ebor. During the year Curtis led the superb ‘Narcissus’ 19 on the First Breakaway, ‘Anxiety Attack’ 19 on the Second Breakaway, freed the Killip route ‘Luce’ 20/21 which was the first climb in new England graded above 20 (it has since been upgraded to 21). That was on the 3rd Breakaway where he also added ‘Prime Cut’ 19/20 with an aid rest, which was overlooked in the description. He also did the testy ‘Knuckleduster’ 18 which was among the first climbs on the Fourth Breakaway. Birchall led ‘Fear and Loathing’ 17 and ‘Rattlesnake’ 18 on the Second Breakaway and the classic ‘Jugular’ 19 (later downgraded to 18) which was the first route recorded on the Fifth Breakaway.

1976

Bob Killip’s only significant contribution at Ebor in 1976 was to steal a route on the 4th breakaway which Curtis had cleaned and not had a chance to climb yet. Killip called the route ‘Rooflet’ 18 (it has since been upgraded to 19). This marked the end of the ‘friendly’ competition between Curtis and Killip. Other routes worth mentioning from 1976 are Jill Kelman’s ‘Double Trouble’ 16 on the 4th Breakaway and Phil Prior’s middle grade classic ‘Caballero’ 14 (since upgraded to 16 after some enthusiastic cleaning years later). The new 2 volume green guide ‘Rockclimbs in New England’ by Bob Killip and Brian Birchall came out in the later part of 1976 and featured 40 routes at Ebor up to grade 19, 27 of which had been added in that year and another 10 were added after the deadline for the guide to bring the years total to 37 new routes and one aid elimination. This was Ebor’s finest hour!

1977

In 1977 Birchall left for Melbourne and Curtis continued on his merry way cleaning up many great climbs at Ebor such as ‘Backdoor Man’ 19 and ‘Sleight of Hand’ 19 on the 4th Breakaway and ‘Affection Injection’ 18 and ‘Bash Street’ 20 on the First Breakaway. He also discovered the 6th Breakaway and did the first easier routes there. Joe Friend arrived in Armidale late in the year and did his only significant routes here, the off width ‘Blinky Bill’ 20 on the First Breakaway and the thin crack ‘Inspiration Point’ 18 on the 5th Breakaway. Killip although still around only made sporadic appearances and led nothing of interest at Ebor in 1977. There were 19 new routes in 1977.

1978

In 1978 both Curtis and Killip left Armidale and Birchall returned from Melbourne but it was Joe Friend who was to dominate the scene in 1978 doing many new routes in Gara Gorge but Ebor apparently didn’t interest him and no new routes were recorded here in 1978.

1979

1979 was a year of general slackness. After Friend left, Birchall was in charge of shop and very little in the way of new routes was done (only 4 at Ebor), the most significant being the rattly fist crack ‘Fidget’ 17 on the 4th Breakaway. It was, however, a period of consolidation after the grade pushing and exploration of the previous few years and it allowed everyone the chance to get out and repeat routes.

There was also a new younger crowd of climbers such as John Lattanzio, Greg Pritchard, Ed Sharpe and later in the year Mark Colyvan, who were keen to push their grades and there was no better place than at Ebor under Birchall’s guiding hand.

1980

1980 saw even more new-comers to Armidale in Paul Bayne and Austin Legler (from the USA). Al Stephens, who had done very little in the past few years jumped into the limelight again with Rob Clark who arrived in Armidale the previous year. The other important development in 1980 was the arrival of ‘Friends’ to New England which had immediate applications at Ebor, and later in the year the use of chalk became common.

The first route to be done in 1980 was Paul Bayne’s lead of an old problem which had been previously attempted by Dick Curtis to give ‘Anyone for Tennis’ 20MO. A couple of months later, also on the Fourth Breakaway, Mark Colyvan led the slippery off width ‘Resurrection Shuffle’ 18M0 and a little later still, visitor Tony Dignan led the classic test piece ‘Brown Buffalo’ 20. However it was the Second Breakaway which received the most attention and yielded many new routes in the latter part of the year.

Clark and Stephens did the classic line ‘Amphetamine Annie’ 18. Austin Legler did ‘Anthrax’ 19M0 (& later freed it at 20) and Lattanzio and Colyvan did many new middle and easy grade routes, the best of which was ‘Hitman’ 15. All in all there were 22 new routes for the year bringing the total to 95 at Ebor at the end of 1980. Lattanzio and Legler left Armidale at the end of the year and Pritchard left early in the next.

At the beginning of 1981 the hardest climb in New England was ‘Demon Dropout’ 21 (later upgraded to 22) put up in 1978 and while Ebor’s hardest was ‘Luce’ 20/21 (later upgraded to 21) freed in 1976. So there had been no advancement in grades at Ebor for 4 years and for 2 years in the rest of New England; that was to change in 198Early in the year Greg Pritchard, Ed Sharp and Al Stephens developed Dead Heroes Buttress and did quite a few routes here, the best of which was ‘Daroof’ 17 led by Stephens. In March Colyvan freed his own route ‘Resurrection Shuffle’ at 18 and later in the same day, along with Ed Sharpe, freed ‘Anyone for Tennis’ 20 under controversial circumstances by preplacing 2 pitons that weren’t present on the first ascent, to protect the scary top section. After much criticism Colyvan removed the pegs and led it free again without them. About midway through the year the new guide book by John Lattanzio and Greg Pritchard came out entitled ‘Climbers Guide to the N.E. Tablelands’ It contained 116 routes recorded at Ebor, although 3 were mistakes (and one omission) so there were 114 routes at this point up to grade 20/2Later that year after the new routing frenzy at Dome Wall had died down, interest reverted to Ebor and Colyvan led (and then freed) the classic offhand crack ‘Lethal Dose’ 21 while also on the 6th breakaway Birchall and Clark took turns on ‘Toxic Shock’ 20 which was one of Clark’s last routes before he left Armidale for Hobart. Right at the end of the year Colyvan led Birchall and Killip up ‘Chemical Warfare’ 22 to bring the years total number of new routes up to 25 along with 4 aid eliminations..

1982

Interest continued at Ebor in the early part of 1982, particularly on the first breakaway where Stephens led ‘Bombay Duck’ 20MO (freed a couple of weeks later, at 21, by Lattanzio, who had returned to Armidale to live), and Colyvan led ‘Pretty Vacant’ 20, ‘Blitzkrieg Bop’ 19 and the desperate flared crack ‘Power Play’ 23MO (freed by Colyvan shortly afterwards at 23). The 4th Breakaway yielded ‘Domination Quickstep’ 19 by Lattanzio and ‘Transactional Burnout’ 20 by Birchall. Colyvan left Armidale for Sydney early in 1982. However he returned later in the year to do ‘Arsenic and Old Lace’ 24 on the 6th Breakaway, which was New England’s first 24. Interest in Ebor waned as the year went on and a total of only 9 routes and 3 aid eliminations were recorded during 1982.

1983

1983 marked the beginning of New England climbers interest in bolt protected walls and slabs and consequently they have been pretty lean years at Ebor since then. During 1983 Colyvan returned to do ‘Blue Murder’ 21 on the Second Breakaway while Stephens led ‘Solid Gold’ 20MO, the first route on Solid Gold Buttress (freed later that same day by Colyvan at 20).

Later in the year Solid Gold Buttress was the scene of a rather unfortunate accident and rescue involving Brian Birchall, a 30 ft ground fall, a variety of popped runners and an unfinished new route. 1983 also saw Mark Colyvan lead the classic ‘It’s My Party’ 22 on the Third Breakaway on yet another of his semi-_regular visits, and Paul Bayne leave Armidale. During 1983 there were 8 new routes along with one aid elimination to bring Ebor’s total number of routes at the end of 1983 up to 137. 1984 sees the return of Richard Curtis to live in Armidale and he frees his old route ‘Prime Cut’ at 20 (which no-one knew had any aid in it, it just so happens that the couple of ascents it had also found it necessary to rest on the rope!) and added ‘Little Wonder’ 18 to the First Breakaway. He also took visitor Kevin Lindorff here so he could do the arête ‘Chocolate Barbarian’ 23, which was the first bolt protected face climb here, although poorly bolted, since the bolt spoils another naturally protected route.

1984 yielded a total of 4 new routes and one aid elimination; In 1985 Stephens does the classic bolt protected face route ‘Sucking Faces’ 20 on the first breakaway.

Curtis and Animal (Paul Colyvan) visited the other side of the gorge and did ‘Snatch and Grab’ 18 (led Curtis) and ‘Grab the Snatch’ 21 (led Animal) on Bondage Buttress. They were the only 3 new routes done in 1985.

1986 saw a couple of aid eliminations of interest with Lattanzio freeing ‘Supermouse’ at 22 and Stephens freeing all but the start of ‘Sundown’ now 20M.

Larry Dixon from Dorrigo began developing Pub Buttress on the other side of the gorge with ‘Damp Monkeys’ 18 being the first route, and probably the best to date. A total of 5 new routes and 2 aid eliminations for the year.

The only activity in 1987 has been Larry Dixon and Al Stephens continuing development of Pub Buttress and bolting some of the arêtes on the second breakaway such as ‘Modern Electrics’ 17 (by Dixon) and ‘Ilean’ 20 (by Stephens), making use of their new power drill. A total of 13 new routes were done in 1987 to bring the total number of routes recorded at Ebor at the end of 1987 to 162 with grade 3 being the easiest and grade 24 being the hardest.

I am tempted to say that the future at Ebor looks fairly bleak however stranger things have happened than crack climbing returning to favour and if recent developments with power drills and aretes continue, Ebor may yet be dragged into the modern era of face climbing. We’ll just have to wait and see.

Mark Colyvan 1 Jan 1988 1988, the Bi-Centennial year, produced four more crack-lines, the best being ‘Tough Customer’ 21 by Jack Lattanzio and Mark Colyvan. Two bolt-protected routes were also established; Tadpole’s ‘It Pays To Belong’ 20 ,and the very beautiful ‘Dream Of The Devil’ by Mark Colyvan. This climb being the first to have fixed hangers at Ebor.

In December 1989 the summer heat melted something in Al Stephens’ brain causing him, with Mark Colyvan, to bolt up ‘Dead Calm’ 22 at the 1st Breakaway . The Nymboida was very low that summer so Larry Dixon and a group of Rafting Guides visited Ebor and did ‘Old Punks and Young Hippies’ 16 on the 2nd breakaway.

1990 saw only two climbs established, both on the 2nd breakaway and both using bolts; ‘Rage’ 21 by Stephens, Gavin Dean and Anita Gordon, and ‘Steel Magnolias’ 24 , equal to the hardest grade at Ebor so far, by Mark Colyvan, Dean and Stephens.

There were no new routes at Ebor during 1991, 1992, and 1993. Many repeats were done during this time at both the First and Second Breakaways, with occasional visits to the Fourth.

Three routes were completed in 1994. At the First Breakaway Brian Cork led Scott Cleland up ‘Biscuit’ 12, and Cleland led Stephens up ‘Nought’ 18.

At the Second Breakaway Gordon Low led Al Stephens, Brian Cork and Toby Waters up ‘Sex and Intrigue’ 20.

1995 saw a new climbing style developing at Ebor, “Shimmying up a fridge”. Gordon Low used this style at the 2nd Breakaway to complete ‘New Blue Dress’ 24, equal to Ebor’s hardest.

In 1996 Gordon Low with Ben Christian, again perfected this technique by leading Ebor’s hardest climb to date, ‘The Proverbial’ 26, at the Third Breakaway.

What’s next? There are many more arêtes to be “shimmied” but they will all be very hard. If you can perfect the technique it will be worth the effort.

Al Stephens 27 Aug 1996

In 98 James Langston with Al Stephens added Funky Monkey.

Either not much happened after this or a lot of history has been lost.

In 2006 the NPWS wanted to ban climbing here but in consultation with the UNEMC future climbing here is secure. In 2007 Liam Jackson and Todd Free added some bolts around the lookout as part of this agreement.

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1.4.9. Mt Yarrowyck 289 routes in Crag

Summary:
Bouldering, Trad climbing and Aid climbing

Lat / Long: -30.461179, 151.374702

summary

Mt Yarrowyck is granite bouldering and climbing. There is a lot of climbing that has been done and still more to be discovered. The boulders range from 2m to 15m high and the roped climbing is up to 2 pitches long.

description

The Mt Yarrowyck Nature Reserve west of Armidale is best known for it’s Aboriginal rock art and it’s isolation. However this area also offers some superb bouldering on exceptionally high quality granite. The boulder fields are extensive and the environment and landings usually friendly. The rock is featured with unusual crystalline pockets, heinous slopers and the arch-typical granite crimper. These combine to offer problems ranging from V0 slabs to steep pocketed test-pieces. The best time to climb is from March through to November. Winter days can be cold with single digit temperatures not unusual whilst pleasant summer mornings can give way to scorching midday sun. The area is serviced by the NPWS who maintain a toilet and some BBQs but drinking water is not available so be warned, particularly if you intend to visit in the summer months.

Jeff Gracie.

access issues

The majority of the bouldering and climbing at Yarrowyck is located on private property, and the land owner was a climber and has granted access to all climbers anytime, EXCEPT for all crags east of the ridge line which are too close to the land owners house and are off limits, in particular 'Captain Pugwash Memorial Buttress'.

Please do not leave garbage around, leave gates as you find them and do not harass stock. Climbing at Yarrowyck is a privilege, not a right.

The access tracks are in the Nature Reserve which is managed by NPWS which takes you to the Aboriginal Rock Art site. Bouldering or climbing in the reserve is not clear so please avoid this and check the boundaries when exploring.

https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/mount-yarrowyck-nature-reserve

https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/topics/parks-reserves-and-protected-areas/park-management/documents/mount-yarrowyck-nature-reserve

approach

Yarrowyck is about 30 minutes west of Armidale.

From Armidale take the Bundarra Rd from Richardsons Hardware store and the Sale yards for about 30 minutes.

When you get to the T-intersection at Thunderbolts Way, turn right and after about 1km turn right into the car park of the Mt Yarrowyck Reserve.

history

It wasn’t until 1975 that the potential of the boulder fields at Yarrowyck was realized. Although the crags higher up the hill had long been a focus of local attention, the numerous problems on the low lying boulders had gone largely unnoticed. Development following the initial reconnaissance's yielded a number of area classics including Killop's Killer , Burchill's Bomber, Latanzio's Lurch and Bayne's Claim To Fame. The main protagonists at this time being Bob Killop, John Latanzio, Brian Burchill, and Paul Bayne. Unlike other bouldering areas at that time the problems at Yarrowyck focused mostly on boldness rather than technical difficulty.

By the mid 80s the focus of the Armidale climbing scene had again returned to roped climbing with the popularity of the ‘practice boulders’ all but a fond memory. However the bouldering at Mt Yarrowyck returned briefly to the limelight in the early 90’s following the arrival of the now infamous Carl Schultz. Although Carl's bouldering passion was seen by some as an oddball activity, he pioneered a number of extremely difficult problems in the Armidale area, many of which are yet to see repeats. It was in 1997 that the Yarrowyck area underwent a full bouldering renaissance after being rediscovered by Armidale locals Ben Christian, Gordon Low, and Jeff Gracie. The new problems all focused on technical difficulty and included the development of the Sharpest Mono Area with it’s classic problems, 'Pocket Fest' (V2), and 'The Sharpest Mono in the World' (V3). Development went into overdrive in early 1999 when the mist finally cleared from Christians’ ‘bouldering goggles’ allowing him to at last realize the true potential of the area (something that Gracie had been telling him for years). The first focus of attention was 'The Trackside Boulder' where 'New Beginning' (V4) and 'Jingoism' (V7) both saw quick ascents.

1.4.10. Wallaby Rocks 18 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Bouldering

Lat / Long: -30.642041, 151.467970

summary

A mixed bag of tumbled of granite with a few gems

access issues

Crown land, should be no access issues, avoid crossing the northern boundary onto farm land.

approach

From the Matilda's BP service station at Uralla, drive west on East street which becomes Kingston Road for 3km until you cross the bridge over Kentucky creek. The boulder field is obvious on the left with the Sentinel boulder clearly enticing you. Park after the bridge on the north side just down Wallaby Rocks road.

history

It seems like everyone has scouted this for years, and it probably has seen some sends before. But recorded history kicked off in Apr 2016

1.4.11. Bluff Rock 8 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad climbing and Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -29.167188, 151.998922

description

Routes are described from left (east facing) to right (north face).

history

Bluff Rock was the site of the first conflict between local settlers and a local Aboriginal group. The true story will never be known, but it is believed that the Aboriginals killed a shepherd named Robinson on the Irby Station. The Aboriginals then fled to the rock, chased by a group of white men who caught them and threw them off the top of the outcrop.

This is one of those crags that is so obvious and that many have had a look at but the climbing history is very foggy.

1.4.12. Beulah 669 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Bouldering

Lat / Long: -30.484800, 150.929000

summary

Rolling terrain covered in (almost) unclimbed granite boulders and domes.

description

Beulah is the Axelsen Family Station. The station is 3000 acres in size and has rolling hills covered in granite boulders as well as 3 large domes up to 70m in height.

access issues

Access to Beulah is closed.

history

The first boulder problems and routes were scrubbed in 2005. The following year more potential problems were scrubbed, GPS'd and left for another time. The idea for the Festivus began in early 2007 and the first Festivus saw 7 people out in August sending some scrubbed lines. The second annual saw attendance double and the date change to Easter. The third annual event became the a full blown Beulah Rock Festivus complete with sponsorship, prizes, events and climbers from all over Australia. 2010 had 60 people from all over coming out for 4 days of perfect weather and a 132 new problems sent! Access to Beulah is now closed.

1.4.13. Gibraltar Rock 5 routes in Crag

Summary:
Bouldering and Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -29.610421, 152.381243

description

Gibraltar Rock is a mountain in Northern New South Wales.

1.4.14. Uncarved Block R&D wall 18 routes in Gym

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -30.538618, 151.687906

summary

Closed.

1.4.15. Kwiamble National Park 112 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Bouldering

Lat / Long: -29.152761, 150.979838

summary

Lots of great quality scultped river granite

description

This guide is very much a draft / work in progress pulling bits from various sources into something coherent. Feel free to add more...

Be wary of paper wasps which tend to build nests in many shady underclings.

access issues

This is inside Kwiambal National Park, more details here:

http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/kwiambal-national-park

approach

Roughly 35 mins north of Ashford or 80 mins North of Inverell in northern NSW

http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/kwiambal-national-park/Visitor-Info#Getting-there-and-parking

where to stay

history

1.4.16. UNEOAC Climbing Wall 36 routes in Gym

Summary:
All Top roping

Lat / Long: -30.491549, 151.638822

summary

Cheap and convenient

description

This gym is run by the University of New England Outdoor Adventure Club. See our facebook group for more info:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/291508959441/

history

The wall was built back in the 90's, in 2014 it was renovated and extended with a sick bouldering cave and viewing mezzanine.

1.4.17. Oaky Creek Falls 3 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -30.575386, 152.069258

approach

Take the Grafton/Dorrigo road from Armidale. Turn right onto the Kempsey Rd. just past the Wollomombi Bridge. Continue along this till you come to the turn off to the Oaky Hydro-Electric power station. At the power station is a vertical railway line. The climb on the falls is upstream of this, access being down the road near the railway or (gulp) abseil the falls. Only one climb exists here, Magnificent Obsession.

1.4.18. Green Valley 0 routes in Area

description

Area of potential 15 minutes north of Bendemeer. Rock is the very sharp, large crystal granite that Bendemeer is famous for.

access issues

West side of the road is crown land along the gully. East side is also crown but may have a long lease held by Gunnalong station. Maybe keep in eye site of the fence till i can completely clear this up.

approach

Park on the western side of the highway near the large dam and Green valley road.

1.4.19. Bendemeer 130 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Bouldering

Lat / Long: -30.884854, 151.163602

summary

Granite

description

Bendemeer area is predominantly granite boulders. The greater area may yet uncover some hidden gems. The boulders are scattered throughout the landscape, with only small clusters grouped. The banks of the macdonald yield many problems

access issues

All climbs listed here are on public access land, crown, TSR, or river access. Many great areas around bendemeer are on private land but due to fear of liability or theft these areas are strictly of limits. Unless you like been shot at while climbing..

approach

Bendemeer is approximately 40 km north of Tamworth and 70 km south of Armidale on the new england highway.

where to stay

ethic

Please close all gates that you enter into and out of TSR, please don't spook stock and Above all PLEASE DO NOT LEAVE ANY RUBBISH! This is the easiest way to get locals off side!

history

Little history is known of any climbing in the area, as fare as we know. No known climbing north of the Moonbi hills and south east of Beulah...

1.4.20. Watsons Creek 5 routes in Area

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -30.749938, 151.036744

summary

Granite

description

An area north west of Bendemeer, holds granite of varied quality. A mixture of Private and Public land. The Public land is two old mining areas that have been made into national parks. The den mountain watsons creek national reserve is huge and has heaps of potential but can at times be difficult to access. The nature reserve in watsons creek has not been fully explored but only has yielded small sharp boulders.

access issues

Both reserves are public access. All private property access is closed unless you have direct permission from the owner.

approach

From Bendemeer head north-west on the Watsons creek road till the t intersection at Longford station. Follow the road to the left and follow the Watsons creek road. Once you are back on the tar you are in the village of Watsons creek.

1.4.21. Warrabah national park 6 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -30.551153, 150.941549

summary

Granite, of good quality along the river. Varying quality in other areas.

description

A spot with plenty of potential, loads of boulders and swimming holes. http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/Warrabah-National-Park

access issues

National park

approach

With a 4x4 (river crossing) from the Armidale travel to Uralla. Then turn off at the kingstown road. Travel towards Kingstown till you get to the retreat turn off, to the left. Turn and head to the retreat. When you come over the river at the retreat turn right into pringle road. turn into glen barra road and and follow that right through to the namoi river. cross the river and turn right and continue into the national park. Alternatively you can travel to Manilla and between manilla lookout and the manilla bridge is the sign and turn off for the park heading north. follow that through 40km to the park. It feels longer.

history

Unknown

1.4.22. Lake Copeton 13 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -29.914538, 150.961942

summary

Plenty of quality granite, much that is unexplored.

description

Lake Copeton is approximately 20 minutes drive south from Inverell. Mainly bouldering, but there may also be some DWS potential. It is a large area that is only partially explored so there are possibly some undiscovered beauties in there.

access issues

None known at this stage. Some rock formations may have significance to traditional owners so I would leave the drills at home.

approach

The main access is either by the "long side" (leaving via Warialda road from Inverell, or the "short side (leaving via the Bundara Rd from Inverell)

where to stay

It is a huge camping area. You can camp for free in some areas or pay to have the luxuries of the camp ground on the long side.

ethic

Its a bouldering area. If you found a route worth bolting you should get permission from the local authorities.

history

Not much is known of previous climbng in the area so feel free to contribute!

1.4.23. Doctors Creek 1 route in Area

Summary:
All Rock climbing

summary

Unknown area somewhere near Armidale, mentioned in Screamer mag 10, Jul-Dec 1981. The closest Doctors Creek I can find is near Narrabri

1.4.24. Wooldridge Fossicking Reserve 0 routes in Area

description

A nice creek with camping and good rock but limited potential. There has been probably a dozen problems and a couple routes put up with no recorded history.

approach

From the Matilda's BP service station at Uralla, drive west on East street which becomes Kingston Road for 3.5km (directly passing 'Wallaby Rocks') then turn right onto Devoncourt road and follow the signs to the Fossicking area for another 2km.

where to stay

1.5. Central Coast 1,360 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.254192, 151.103603

description

history

Local climbers, especially the Wondabyne Climbing Club (active mid-70s to mid-80s), comprehensively explored the area's roped climbing potential by the early 1980s, but sadly not a lot of information survives from this period. What is known is that they did a lot of exploration by boat, so most of the cliffs visible from the water would have been explored by this group.

This group climbed quite a lot with Joe Friend, who is reported to have lived a semi-hermit-like existence on Long Island near Brooklyn for several months during this period. One story involves a very hungover ascent up the tall eastern cliff on Lion Island, which, given the apparent rock quality there, was probably a pretty terrifying outing. Another story involves Phil Stallard of the WCC aid climbing the major crack system at Eagle Rock on the Hawksbury, with his leg in a cast (they'd planned on attempting to free the route, but Phil broke his leg in the weeks prior so they went and aided it instead).

In the mid-90s the Monks brothers explored much of the 'Bouddi National Park' areas, and top-roped and bouldered throughout the park (in particular the Lobster Beach areas and 'Bullima'). At around this time, Paul Riviere and friends were developing Joll's Bridge, and over the subsequent decade development inched north and east.

Development in Bouddi National Park (especially at the Lobster Beach Cave) has been quite contentious with NPWS and local residents, especially as the park has also been illegally developed by mountain bikers during this same period. A new plan of management was drafted in 2019 which seeks to ban climbing from the entirety of the park.

1.5.1. The Tanks 4 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -33.528794, 151.249233

1.5.2. Palmdale 2 routes in Crag

Summary:
Bouldering and Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -33.315055, 151.351014

description

This area has an awesome boulder cave with potential for some rnice really hard lines on thin crimps. There is also a heap of bolted climbs on either side of the road. Some look quite hard. Mostly equiped with oversized glue in hex head bolts.

access issues

Turn off the F3 freeway at Ourimbah, turn at roundabout and head north parallel to freeway till you can turn left and go under freeway following signs to Palmdale. Follow this road for a few km's till you see a sign for the logging road up the dirt hill (Middle Ridge Rd). Follow this steep poorly maintained road till you come to the obvious rock cutting. The climbs are on either side of the road.

It may still be possible to access the location from the northern side along Yarramalong Rd via Red Hill Rd (turn at the Tree Tops turn-off). Follow this until you can turn left to continue along Middle Ridge Rd.

approach

Middle Ridge Rd is closed and blocked at the intersection of Palmdale Rd. You can park here or nearby and walk (uphill the whole way) approx. 25-30 minutes to the rock cuttings. Alternatively the road is still accessible by trail and mountain bikes.

1.5.3. Brooklyn 11 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -33.548384, 151.212628

description

Brooklyn is a town on the Central Coast of New South Wales with a population of approximately 750 people. It lies just 56 kilometres north of Sydney's CBD.

approach

Brooklyn is easily accessible by car via the Pacific Highway or Pacific Motorway.

where to stay

The Brooklyn Motel provides accommodation for travellers.

1.5.4. Koolewong 112 routes in Crag

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.470042, 151.315729

description

Koolewong is a suburb in the Central Coast region of New South Wales. Koolewong has a population of approximately 800 people.

approach

Koolewong is easily accessible by car via Brisbane Water Drive.

1.5.5. Dark Forrest 41 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -33.483044, 151.308406

description

Some beautiful blocs and caves scattered across a hillside with views of Woy Woy bay. Will be a fantastic area once developed, alot of potential for new problems.

© (dazzla)

approach

To access 'Dark Forrest' find Woy Woy Bay road, Phegans bay area. Follow Woy Woy Bay Road untill you reach the right hand hair pin that turns onto Phegans Bay road. Turn right here but park imediately on the left in a clearing at the top of the hill. Walk back across Woy Woy Bay road and past some crash barriers to find the obvious walking trail that leads off to your left. I you follow this trail for 5mins boulders will begin to appear on your left. The better ones are farther along near where the track winds close to the back of some houses. If you head up the hill to the bottom of the cliff line this is where the 'big dry cave' is located. The monkey cave is the small low cave to the left of the huge cave. The happy place is located high above the big dry cave on the upper cliff line and is quite tricky to find.

© (dazzla)

1.5.6. Warrah Trig 7 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -33.552770, 151.289030

1.5.7. Bouddi National Park 150 routes in Crag

Access: Draft POM bans climbing

There's a new POM out for Bouddi NP, and it places a blanket ban on all rockclimbing within the park. Submissions are due by Sept 30th, 2019.

Details here:

https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/topics/parks-reserves-and-protected-areas/park-management/community-engagement/bouddi-national-park-draft-plan-of-management

See warning details and discuss

Created about a year ago
Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.520404, 151.385415

1.5.8. Umina 193 routes in Crag

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.535490, 151.296762

description

A small but impressive little wall blessed with solid rock and a short stroll from the car. Generally the wall is vertical to slightly overhanging with the exception of the small roof below the 'Arete' in the centre. The wall is quite high in the centre with some of the problems having deceptively difficult top outs so a good spotter is recommended highly. A few projects remain to be done; however the wall to the right past the main wall has been left un climbed. All problems are top outs and are sure to get your pulse going.

Useful Info: Guide kindly provided by Dan da Silva.

© (pete_w)

approach

Find Mt Ettalong Road 'Umina' and follow this towards Patonga. Drive 3.5km past the Pearl Beach turn off until you come to quite a sharp left hand bend with a rocky out-crop on the corner (if you start heading down the steep road into Patonga, you've gone too far). Park on the left of the road, just after a telegraph pole where there is a large clear area for several cars.

Walk back towards the corner and head right into the bush near the second telegraph pole (you should be able to see the cliff line up on your right). Keep heading right when you come to the small cave, there is one project to be done here on the overlapping roof. Follow the broken cliff line for a short distance until you come to the obvious main wall with the central Arête feature.

© (pete_w)

1.5.9. Blackwall 78 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.506458, 151.335646

summary

This is a pleasant small South facing summer crag with a few moderately graded classic sporty routes with the bonus of a glorious view over Broken Bay.

approach

Park at the end of Mulbong Road, Orange Grove, and take the well defined walking track (the old billycart track as known when we were kids) on the left just past the last house, not the gated track! Walk uphill for about 200 metres where you will pass a large boulder in the middle of the track. Continue up, veering L up a steep track to a blocky outcrop of sandstone. From the platform you reach you can access the top of the cliff to the right or descend the tight squeeze to the cliff’s base. Follow the base of the cliff for access to Kit Kit wall, Red Head wall, Offspring wall, and Underworld. Underworld is 70m further L of Offspring Wall. It is an marked by a collapsed roof after-which is a great little 5mt long horizontal bouldering roof. If you ferret around there is another mini area on the lower tier with three mini-sport routes

history

Most of the routes at this crag were developed in 1996 in a frenzy by Richard Jeffrey. Several large boulders perched above the crag offer some good bouldering which was popularised by Gary Hamilton who developed most of the problems around 2000 - 2001. In 2015 the area has received some newer lines and rebolting to rejuvenate some great little lines on superb rock, albeit a bit damp at times.

1.5.10. West Gosford 76 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing, Rock climbing and Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -33.421223, 151.315201

summary

Mainly sport climbing with a few trad lines thrown in. Bring bolt plates

access issues

Drive along Manns Rd, turn L into Carnarvon, and L into Tathra. Park on road at top gate at 'House of Praise', an evangelical church that looks like a factory (large SOM black sign on building). Walk up hill on uphill side of this building, up to wire fence on top of hill. Walk along wire fence till you get to a boulder and onto an old fire trail. Turn right here for House of Praise crag or left for other crag.

1.5.11. Tascott Cave 21 routes in Crag

Summary:
Rock climbing and Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -33.454723, 151.309730

1.5.12. Point Clare 33 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -33.437717, 151.310346

description

A small yet impressive crag offering many climbs for all levels of climbers. Well protected and offering some good challenges Point Clare is well worth travelling to for a climb.

access issues

Park at the end of Coolarn Ave, Point Clare, where it turns right and becomes Nari Ave. Find the vague track to the left of No.2 which heads up the hill to the crag. Ensure you do not park your car near the crag entrance as it's right on a corner and can create a traffic hazard. Park further down the road and on the grass.

approach

A short walk up the hill between left of No.2 will find you at the Point Clare crag (Left Crag). The crag extends quite far to the right and partially to the left, up the hill.

1.5.13. Woy Woy 272 routes in Crag

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.485652, 151.303020

1.5.14. Popran 26 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -33.422724, 151.169275

description

This is a great crag situated on Mangrove Creek, a tributary of the Hawkesbury river. It is 3km north of the small town of Spencer. It is predominantly ring bolted sport climbs, with one or two mixed routes thrown in. it faces west and is uncomfortably hot on summer afternoons.

access issues

Take the Somersby exit Off the M1 to Peats Ridge and continue to Central Mangrove. Follow the signs towards Wisemans Ferry on Wisemans Ferry Rd. Just before crossing Mangrove creek Popran Rd exits to the left. The road is unsealed and parallels the creek. Continue past a caravan park, Pure Valley, and Hominy Creek. Just past a sharp right hand turn there is a grass clearing on the right hand side of the road adjacent to a creek to park. Cross the creek, then head left steeply up the hill

approach

Pick up the track near some large boulders And zig zag up the hill. You should arrive near Little Green Slugs.

history

First explored by Phil Stallard and the Wondabyne Climbing Club in the late 1970s / early 1980s. Sadly no information survives from this period.

1.5.15. Hominy 16 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -33.420093, 151.166018

summary

Great beginner crag! Short walk in, well bolted and lots to choose from in the easier grade ranges. Ring bolts with ring bolt anchors.

approach

After you pass the Homnay creek bridge on Popran road there is a track 100m on the left. Park here out of the way. Head directly up the hill through the bush. Once you hit the cliff line head right (looking at the cliff) and you will find the crag. Routes are listed left to right. The last 4 are around the corner facing directly south.

ethic

This is National Park so follow standard rules.

1.5.16. Joe Pike's 40 Acres 3 routes in Crag

Summary:
Rock climbing and Sport climbing

1.5.17. Deliverance 18 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing and Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -33.476792, 151.139634

description

Hawkesbury sandstone at it's best. 'Steep', water polished and long. Shame about the current problematic access through private property (permission required) - or a rather epic 4.5km walk along fire roads from above. Cliff faces north-east, and in summer gets into total shade by 2pm. The big plus is that the crag is very steep and has major corners which block much of the sun, so you can climb here all day in summer. The crag is famous for the tilted slopers which turn an easy looking route into total desperation!

© (nmonteith)

1.5.18. The Bluffs 30 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing, Rock climbing and Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -33.499984, 151.177458

1.5.19. Joll's Bridge 145 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad climbing, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.504773, 151.186622

description

Once "a crag of its time (90s) it is full of rusty carrots, mixed gear, choss and no lower offs" - until recently, (2010 onwards) when a big retro-bolting effort commenced. Spread out over a long broken cliff there are spectacular views over the Hawkesbury that almost make you forget the hum of the freeway. There are some good climbs hidden away. Online guides for this area are available through Sydney Rockies. The following descriptions are to update that information, as the area is slowly "modernised" by local climbers.

© (vlw)

approach

Heading north on the F3 you cross Jolls bridge and a few hundred metres beyond this there is an emergency bay where you can reverse safely between two guard rails into a grassy area where there is room for 5 cars (As of April 2015 the parking area is in process of expansion).

From the parking area walk towards the river stepping over a barbed wire fence (15 seconds). For the downriver end turn left and walk for 2 minutes with the fence to your left. The path is very narrow with a steep drop off in sections. After walking past an extremely narrow section, a descent gully will appear on your right (if there are fallen logs on the path you have gone too far).The easiest way to the base is to continue winding your way down and southwards (left) until you come to the reo-steel steps taking you down a slot. Now walk back northwards about 40 metres to where the climbs start. Absolute Honey is the first route. This is the southernmost climb on the cliff. Routes are described R to L.

Alternatively park on the old Pacific 'Highway' as described in the SSS guide and walk under the bridge. Follow the guard rail untill the stone cutting and this is the southern end of the crag.

© (vlw)

where to stay

No need to book into a motel or camp. Jolls is only a 40min drive north of Sydney

© (vlw)

ethic

There are a couple of mixed routes but the majority have been retrobolted to bring the crag into the 21st century. If it is still mixed gear, leave it like that!

© (vlw)

history

Initially discovered in 1990 by Wayne Anderson, he let the secret out to Paul Riviere. At the same time Andrew Powell and Phil Stallard (Wondabyne climbers Assoc) were scoping out the place. 10 years of development ensued through the 90's with many contributors putting up lines including Ross Linsley, Paul Riviere, Richard Jeffrey, John Wilde et al. The crag was largely forgotten in the first few years of the 21st cent, but has become once again since many routes have been retro-bolted with rings making it a good moderate sports crag.

© (vlw)

1.5.20. Hawkesbury Bridge Cliff 2 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad climbing and Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -33.541210, 151.197184

description

As you drive south on the F3 freeway this is the obvious wall with a small orange cave on the right level with the freeway on right.

access issues

Climbing west of the Hawkesbury river bridge is forbidden. It is part of the muogmarra nature reserve

1.5.21. Craftys 16 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Deep water soloing

Lat / Long: -33.581052, 151.137795

summary

The best deep water soloing around. Good deep water and great high steep wall. What more do you want?

approach

By boat, about 20mins away from berowra waters.

where to stay

Hire a house boat and moor at the base of the wall.

1.5.22. The Entrance Baths 11 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -33.350656, 151.503834

summary

Seaside bouldering

description

Small 3-4m high headland immediately south of The Entrance Baths - opposite 98 Boondilla Rd. Being seaside, it is sandy and the rock is a bit soft in places, so expect breakages. It's not worth going out of your way to go here but if you're holidaying nearby you can still have a bit of fun.

approach

1 minute walk-in time if you're casual about it.

ethic

This is strictly a no bolting crag.

history

Have seen chalk on here many years ago but no known recorded efforts.

1.5.23. Wondabyne 40 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -33.497974, 151.252074

summary

Bolt-free bush cliffs

description

Wondabyne is a set of cliffs near the Wondabyne Train Station. Access to the cliffs is via train (Wondabyne Mainline and Wondabyne North) or boat (Wondabyne East).

approach

Train or boat

history

The cliffs in this areas were explored and developed in the late 70s by the prolific but long defunct Wondabyne Climbing Club.

1.5.24. Southern Cousin 44 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -33.518376, 151.193851

summary

A 15 minute drive from Wahroonga this crag offers climbs of varying grades and heights including a few mini multi pitches to get some practice in.

description

A series of small western facing crags just south of Joll's Bridge. This land has an access road leading to a number of Energy Australia power poles which can be seen from the freeway. Some climbs have extra bolts in them to help avoid decking out on mid climb ledges.

access issues

This land is accessed by Energy Australia so please don't block the locked gate. The shoulder is also frequently used by trucks as a rest stop so ensure there's room for them to pull over. Ample parking for climbers.

approach

From the Hawkesbury River Bridge continue north for two minutes passing one "90" sign then two "90/100" signs. Slow down and pull into the shoulder at the third "90/100" sign. Park car here taking note of "Access Issues".

From locked gate follow the winding access road up and around to the first fork in the road where you'll see a fallen metal sign. Take the right fork to access Spice Alley or left fork to access remainder of crag.

To return to Sydney continue north for 7 minutes taking the Mt White exit. Do a U-turn after the traffic lights and you're on your way home.

If coming from Newcastle, take the Mooney Mooney/Brooklyn exit just before the Hawkesbury River. Keep turning left until you are back on the freeway heading North, then as above to approach crag.

history

Stumbled upon by Phil Stallard while looking for a location to paint the Hawkesbury River in 2017. Developed by Brendon Flanagan, John Hollott, Marty Middlebrook and Chante Fisk in 2018. Site of one active and one inactive geocache.

1.5.25. Way Out West 9 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Sport climbing

access issues

Park at top of access road (off Nells Rd, West Gosford) that runs up to the container storage site. There is a trail/path that leaves the N/W corner of the container site and runs uphill behind. At the 2nd large boulder head diagonally right, up the hill (roughly north). After about 200m you shoud strike a little cave that is the start for Into The Night. Climbs below are from left to right.

1.6. Sydney Metropolitan 8,112 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.803565, 151.000550

summary

Convenience, convenience, convenience!

description

What Sydney lacks in quality it makes up in quantity and convenience - very few large cities boast this much climbing and bouldering. And while the number of world class roped climbs is relatively low, many of the routes are well worth doing, and there is an abundance of high quality bouldering.

And with world-class destinations such as the Blue Mountains and Point Perpendicular close by, it's self evident that Sydney is one of the top climbing cities in the world.

1.6.1. Hornsby and the North 1,054 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.620101, 151.186843

1.6.2. Sutherland 1,111 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -34.025631, 151.086285

summary

The Shire has a long history of climbing. Accessible cliffs, routes you do not have to die for and a variety of locations keep the suburbanite climbers happy. Because of the not so steep nature of much of the sandstone in the area, a lot of routes are of a moderate grade making it a good place for new climbers to develop their craft.

description

Most of the climbing can be found on the rim of the hills, overlooking the Woronora River and Georges Rivers. The rock is the usual Sydney sandstone but the Cathedral has a a weird type of stone that is a refreshing change from the norm.

access issues

For over 50 years climbers in the Sutherland Shire have enjoyed free access to many fantastic crags and caves. But as of 2014 there have been access problems emerging at several climbing and bouldering areas due to aboriginal art sites and shell middens in caves. Sutherland Shire Council and the Dept of Enviroment and Heritage have announced closures and sign-posted some of these aboriginal sites, with further closures and signs to be added during summer/autumn 2016/2017. Areas of particular problem are ground level overhangs with flat bases, the type of terrain popular at hard bouldering areas. Whilst the details are sorted out keep a low profile, clean up ALL rubbish (inc removing mattresses in bouldering caves) and avoid climbing at closed areas. In particular treat non-climbers you see at crags with the utmost respect as they could be rangers, archeologists, traditional owners or anyone else with a dim view of climbers and the ability to shut us out. Climbing in Royal National Park has been officially banned for many years - probably due mostly to the Wattamolla 'don't jump off rocks' cliff-diving-into-water ban. For more information about aboriginal sites and rockclimbing please read this link from Sutherland Council: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0KxtU2nUQB9cjhHUWE4cE5HWnM/view?usp=sharing

approach

There is easy access to all the sites with an average walking time from car to cliff being under five minutes! To get the Shire drive south towards Wollongong from the Sydney CDB or take the Heathcote Road if coming from the South West. West Sydney climbers can approach aiming for Menai. Alternatively, take the train.

history

Climbing has been going on since the 1960's in the Shire. Gossip has it that an old doctor used to play around the cliffs on the Woronora River in those early years. Joe Friend was also known to climb here back in the 1970's. You can find some old pitons, pin scars at odd locations such as the Heathcote Bridge, Menai area and at the Cathederal. It was common that Scouts and at times the Army regularly frequented places like Menai, Lucas Heights and Alfords Point.

The 1980's saw a steep rise in development with climbers from the Loftus Crew, Anthony Scharnbel,Damian Taylor and Bruce Stevens. A big influence in the 1980-1990's was David Barnes. Dave developed several new areas and put up scores of routes across the shire, including the classic routes at Rainbow Wall and Ruthless Babe and a handful of others at Heathcote. He has now moved onto Tassie. Mikl of course had flurries of activity at the Cathedral, Bonnett Bay and Heathcote when he was working with Homer Simpson at the Lucas Heights Nuclear facility. A Young Graham Fairburn made a good contribution to the Cathederal, before growing muscles at Nowra.

In the last ten years Jason Lammers has added new routes as well as re-bolting the old routes, lower offs and rings have been added to most shire crags now. What will you add? DB

1.6.3. North West 1,376 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Bouldering

Lat / Long: -33.759918, 150.932930

1.6.4. Northern Beaches 989 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.700369, 151.281131

description

The Northern Beaches of Sydney include the suburbs of Manly, Pittwater and Wakehurst.

1.6.5. North Shore 1,726 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Bouldering

Lat / Long: -33.775265, 151.181640

summary

Bouldering, lead and trad on good quality sandstone.

description

The North Shore has something on offer for all lovers of chalk and rock. There's the Old classic spots like the amazing highballs at Lindfield Rocks, Pumpy much loved problems of Sissy Crag and some brilliant trad at Brown's Road.

New to the Area is the Lindfield-like When Crags Collide, the diverse, unappreciated Blues Point and some Slab-tastic climbing at Harbour Side Slabs.

ethic

Respecting the enviroment and keeping crags clean will maintain a healthy and important relationship between the climbing community, local councils and National Parks. Carry out what you take in and enjoy what the North Shore has to offer.

If you come across an area that is being developed or you think could be under development, please show all due respect to the developers and do not climb the projects listed on thecrag.com.

history

The North Shore has seen some amazing climbs and problems put up over time with a slump in its development during the early 2000s.

However that all changed with the turn of the decade seeing the start of the Great Bouldering Boom with the North Shore getting some much needed development attention by a group of enthusiastic lovers of rock.

The word on the street is that this attention will only increase as the years go by, making the North Shore a strong epicenter of climbing in Sydney

1.6.6. Sydney CBD 1 route in Region

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -33.871885, 151.208830

1.6.7. Eastern Suburbs 681 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.921403, 151.235022

description

An amazing example of sea side crags opening up for people interested in all things rock. Top roping, lead climbing, trad, high lining and abseiling, the Eastern Suburbs has it all. During summer you and your friends will more than likely have mother nature put a show on for you with her wildlife. There's always a good chance of seeing whales, dolphins and other creatures. Clovelly is a prime location for this as well as Diamond Bay and Bondi. If you're interested in a little adrenalin rush then perhaps Rosa Gully is the place for you with several high line anchors in situ for those who dare!

Most crags have easy parking with only a short distance to walk, scramble or abseil into the crag.

1.6.8. Inner West 555 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.897807, 151.122433

description

Located close to Sydney CBD, offering an assortment of lead climbing, top roping and a plethora of bouldering.

Sydney's Inner West has a surprising amount of climbing for being so close to the city. Earlwood gets by far the most attention (and so it should) but new crags with good potential are being discovered every month.

This location offers everything from well protected and varied short routes in nice bush surroundings, to pumpy low caves and solid highballs with nasty landings by the water.

Being so close to Sydney, these areas are well worth a look in especially with Iron Cove offering several decent crags to boulder at.

Respect to the enviroment and keeping crags clean will maintain a healthy and important relationship between the climbing community, local councils and National Parks. Carry out what you take in and enjoy what the Inner West has to offer.

If you come across an area that is being developed or you think could be under development, please show all due respect to the developers and do not climb the projects listed on thecrag.com

1.6.9. Western Suburbs 40 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -33.877172, 150.952210

1.6.10. Colo River 85 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -33.420830, 150.775044

description

A good collection of mixed crags with some nice sport areas and slab climbing. Provides a nice winter location close to Sydney.

Old school sport and Trad areas with a mix of carrots and fixed hangers. If developing make use of Trad placements where possible and if replacing bolts please respect the route as it is and replace bolt for bolt.

1.6.11. South West 407 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.951016, 150.764892

description

The neglected area of Sydney cragging, strange considering the quality of rock and recent finds like St helens Park bouldering, the big Junkyard Cave and the Hide Away.

In the 70's and 80's a bunch of routes were done at the Woolwash at the back of Airds near Campbelltown, short cracks and mossy slabs mostly done on top rope. A rough guide was done but it lacked details and descriptions.

In roughly 2011 and 2012 Byron Glover set to work on the quality rock and cave of the Wedderburn and St Helens Park bouldering areas finding some absolute gems in the process. Steep and pocketed on quality stone, V3 - V11, easy access, who wants more?

In 2012 Matt Brooks went looking for bouldering in the area after moving nearby and getting a copy of the then new Sydney climbing guide - south of the harbour.

He found the new sector to the Woolwash, the Junkyard Cave with its water polished sandstone and classy steep routes, some that would be quite at home in the Grampians (not in Suburban Sydney).

In early 2014 he also discovered the Hide Away another quality sandstone offering on the banks of the Georges River with a variety of sport routes from 12 - 28 and the 20m roof of the Ghetto Superstar.

With the amount of rock along the length of the Georges River there are sure to be more discoveries.

1.6.12. Royal National Park 87 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -34.129261, 151.064667

1.7. Illawarra and Shoalhaven 3,827 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -34.772557, 150.610345

summary

A major destination south of Sydney, centered mostly on the popular single pitch sport crags of Nowra and the epic sea cliffs of Point Perpendicular.

description

This is sandstone country. This is a large area with numerous crags. Up north you have the popular Mt Kiera above Wollongong and the jungle adventures at Scarface and Coalcliff. Further south are the basalt quarrys at Bombo. The best climbing in the area however is around Nowra where sport climbing rules and convenience is key. Thousands of routes near shops, swimming and coffee. If you want to scare yourself then don't miss the world class sea cliffs of Point Perpendicular.

where to stay

Nowra and Wollongong have good caravan parks.

ethic

Lots of bolts in this region. Most development has been done after the 1980s.

1.7.1. Appin 21 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -34.205569, 150.797798

1.7.2. Wollongong 607 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -34.373392, 150.853736

summary

Mostly short (8 - 18m) sandstone climbs with easy access. There are also some multi-pitch adventures along the escarpment north of Wollongong.

description

Australias 9th largest city. With excellent beaches, mountain bike trails and a relaxed pace (as compared to Sydney)

access issues

There are no serious access issues in the region. Don't be a dick and mess up access for future generations by bolting within sight of tourist tracks or pissing off rangers.

approach

This area is about 1.25 hours drive from CBD of Sydney. Crags are within a 20km (max.) range of each other. Most are easy to drive-to and then short walk access.

ethic

Retro-bolting of established trad routes is frowned upon. There has been some controversy in recent years about new routes being bolted above tourist tracks. Please don't do this.

Please try to use available natural gear where possible, and do not bolt cracks or potential trad climbs. If you do the bolts may be removed.

If you do need to top rope, please do it through your own gear as the wear on the anchors is both difficult and expensive to maintain.

It would be appreciated if brushing of holds becomes part of your climbing routine - do it with a soft bristled brush and never a steel brush!

The removal of vegetation - both from the cliff bases and the climbs - is not seen as beneficial to aesthetics of the environment nor to our access to it.

Consider bolting single lines rather than many link ups and eliminates, where there are established lines also consider the need to add bolts to establish link ups. It can often create an eyesore.

It is a privilege to climb in the Illawarra to maintain access our best approach is to 'Respect Native Habitat, Tread Softly and Leave No Trace'. Do not cut flora and keep any tracks and infrastructure as minimal as possible or risk possible closures.

1.7.3. Kiama 100 routes in Area

Summary:
Trad climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -34.663500, 150.859088

description

Volcanic sea cliffs surrounding the 'famous' tourist town of Kiama, south of Wollongong.

1.7.4. Nowra 1,328 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -34.885200, 150.543882

summary

The best sport climbing in the state. Sometimes ugly, but great climbing, with a huge variety of styles. Also home to some of the state's hardest bouldering.

description

Nowra is a fantastic sport climbing area, in quite a beautiful urban setting, with many of the crags sitting in valleys carved out by the Shoalhaven River. It is not unusual to park your car outside someone's house, then disappear into the bush, and 3 minutes later be at the crag. The climbing is characterised by being steep and powerful, there are not many pure endurance routes. While the climbing is not as visually inspiring as other areas in Australia, once you're on it's very good.

Nowra is a very comfortable place to climb, most crags require a five minute approach at the most. All routes are bolted with easy lower offs and the rock is generally very good. While Nowra doesn’t offer the casual café style that the Blue Mountains has, it is a good location for rest days, with reasonable surf only a short drive away. Nowra itself has all the amenities you would expect from a reasonably sized city.

For the beginner climber Nowra doesn't have a lot to offer, all the easier type climbs do tend to be the chossier ones, and there is very little below grade 18. For the intermediate to advanced climber however there is a lot of very good routes to do, especially if you climb 20+. The best crag in the area is Thompson's Point, it offers more climbing in a greater range of grades than any other Nowra crag. This is probably the best crag to visit if you are an intermediate climber. In the 18 to 24 range there is a plethora of really good routes, all well protected and ideal for pushing your grades on.

For the advanced climber there is loads of stuff to do. There are a lot of other crags apart from Thompson's, they are not quite so large and varied. The intermediate climber has to wander about a bit, but there are some real gems to be found. For the harder climber Nowra is a paradise of projects to do.

Apart from climbing there is also a lot of bouldering, a lot of hard stuff has been done at areas like Lot 33 and Cheesedale, with much more being developed.

All up Nowra is a great place to climb, what it lacks in presence, it makes up for in fun.

approach

Three hours south of Sydney. It’s easy to get public transport to Nowra, once you are there many of the crags are in walking distance of each other. If you're staying at one of the parks opposite Thompson's Point it may be wise to hire a canoe to get across, which saves a long walk.

where to stay

It is possible to bush camp for free, but you want to have found a very secluded spot- climbers' cars have been broken into. The best option is to pay for camping at one of the parks opposite Thompson's Point.

1.7.5. New Nowra - Braidwood Road 899 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -35.013771, 150.413379

summary

Wilderness sport climbing at crowd free crags.

description

The climbing is mostly vertical sports climbing varying from 15 to 40+ meters high. Rock quality is 1st class Shoalhaven water carved sandstone, very similar to Thompsons Point.

history

Early development by Bullen and Hill in the 90s, but the majority of routes were established by local legand Rick Phillips and friends in the 2010s.

1.7.6. Point Perpendicular 767 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad climbing, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -35.040913, 150.805996

summary

Point Perpendicular is a beautiful seaside climbing area with a fantastic atmosphere and often incredible exposure.

description

Has been re-structured to more closely align with the most recent (2011) guidebook by Robert Dun. The main difference being that the Upper and Lower cliff lines are grouped into common areas.

access issues

Point Perp is located within a Navy Weapons Range and is closed on most weekdays for live fire exercises. It is generally open only on weekends and during NSW school holidays, but even at these times access can be restricted due to crowding and the limited amount of car parking within the range. In peak season the entrance gates can therefore be closed for hours at a time until the range empties out again; at these times consider starting early to beat the rush. At all times of the year, it is best to ring the rangers to check accessibility before you go (02 4448 3411), to avoid the risk of being turned away.

If the range is closed you can always go to the Town Cliffs, accessed from Currarong.

approach

Very easy drive, bitumen to the entrance station at Currarong, then 10km of dirt to the Lighthouse. Then a very easy walk, only 2-5 minutes walk for the main sectors.

where to stay

There is car camping at Honeymoon Bay with toilets but no water. This is inside the navy weapons range and signposted on the drive-in track. It's only open Friday and Saturday nights, plus Sunday nights during NSW long weekends and all week during NSW school holidays. During school holidays it can be full with family holidaymakers; you'll need to book a long way in advance.

You can also stay at a caravan park at Currarong or Callala.

ethic

Point Perp is predominantly a trad crag. There has been more bolting recently but this is a particularly contentious topic. A lot of the bolts are the traditional Aussie carrot and some routes require you to bring up to a dozen keyhole hangers.

1.7.7. Jervis Bay 85 routes in Area

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -35.142481, 150.707974

description

Southern head of Jervis Bay. Sea side bouldering. Some of the crags are in Booderee National Park.

1.7.8. Cataract Gorge 1 route in Crag

Summary:
All Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -34.245231, 150.778359

1.7.9. The Castle 0 routes in Crag

description

Boulder fields on the middle plateau of The Castle.

access issues

Morton National Park

1.7.10. Bargo River 1 route in Crag

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -34.308150, 150.540068

1.7.11. Kangaroo Valley River 1 route in Crag

Summary:
All Deep water soloing

Lat / Long: -34.727308, 150.521180

summary

Small Riverside DWS Crag

description

A short wall right in Kangaroo Valley town with a bunch of options on the wall beyond the one line listed. Great spot for a dry warm day in summer.

approach

Park in town and make your way down to the park on the eastern side of the Hampden Bridge by the water.

Either swim or paddle across the river, get dropped on the base of the wall and send!

where to stay

There's a caravan park 150m down the river from the wall, and some other hotels around in town

1.7.12. Lee's Road 13 routes in Cliff

Summary:
Rock climbing, Top roping and other styles

Lat / Long: -34.597675, 150.676655

description

Raw, untamed climbing on the beautiful Illawarra Escarpment.

approach

Head East from Robertson down Lee's Road. After 1.3km on Lee's Road you will enter a section of the Budderoo National Park and there is a track turnout left to a small fenced lookout. Walk approximately 100m left along the cliff line to reach an abseil area.

descent notes

100m left from the lookout there is evidence of an old rappel area (2 studs). Suggest using one of the two large trees for a rappel down (60m).

Whilst climbing out of the cliff is possible a trad rack is required and rock quality, especially on the descent route, is mixed. If unsure, leave your rappel line fixed and be prepared to ascend it.

history

Rod & Sue Young approx 1989

1.7.13. Maldon Bridge Cutting 4 routes in Cliff

Summary:
All Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -34.201208, 150.631716

description

A cutting on the now abandoned north side of Maldon Bridge Rd. Its a small crag (approx 8m in height) with super easy access & 5 min walk down to the Napean River for a quick cool off in summer. Maldon weir (spillway slide) is also located just 250m upstream.

approach

Park at the boom gate on the Noth side of Maldon Bridge Rd.

https://goo.gl/maps/NsjYsqvjVj42

Continue on foot past the 2nd boom gate, then another 200m to the cutting.

1.8. South Coast 171 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -36.416379, 149.988860

summary

Sandstone sea-cliff climbing a long way from anywhere.

© (nmonteith)

description

A variety of climbing styles can be found throughout the south coast of NSW. Sea cliff climbing and bouldering on quality sandstone with hidden gems located inland with the deep water soloing areas, and harder rock types found further south. With it's abundance of small towns and amazing beaches and a variety of other outdoor activities within the region it's a holiday paradise, but with plenty of routes and problems still yet to be discovered too!

The main area offering the largest number of routes is Ben Boyd National Park at the southern end of the NSW coast, also host to the Light to Light multi-day walk.

This area was ravaged by the 2019 Bushfires, so come with no supplies and spend up in the small towns where they really need it.

© (nmonteith)

approach

About two hours south of Sydney, or about 6 hours from Melbourne. Easily accessible from Canberra too in a few hours.

© (nmonteith)

where to stay

Any of the small towns offer Airbnb's, camping and other various accommodation types, most of them right by the beach. Try to avoid staying at the crags as most are on private land or in a position to upset locals.

© (nmonteith)

history

Crags were first found in the region and began development in the early 1990's with a slow but consistent rate of discovery by many different people throughout the years.

© (nmonteith)

1.8.1. North Durras Caves 1 route in Crag

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -35.634404, 150.313764

description

Sandstone cliffs around the caves on the Durras North beach. Be careful when climbing as the sandstone is really crumbly.

approach

Can be approached from the beach access or from along the beach. For beach access; When Driving along the Durras road, just after Depot beach turn off there is two car parks on the left hand side of the road. At the second car park there is a path that leads to a set of stairs, when you get to the bottom of the stairs, turn right and follow the edge of the beach until you get to the cave. For beach access; follow the beach towards Point Upright until you get to the cave.

history

Climbing started here in early 2019 by a family who didn't want to go to Nowra and drove to their local beach and found a slab of rock to climb.

1.8.2. Emily Miller Beach 4 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -35.673496, 150.301879

summary

Amazing beachside climbing

description

Pretty beachside climbing on a quiet beach with a selection of good problems with more that could be created by linking a few together

access issues

Located within National Park so due care needs to be taken in regards to this. No marking of climbs, be friendly to rangers, clean up any area you go to etc.

approach

Drive to Murramarang Beachfront Nature Resort and then go through the bush track on the right (you can drive or walk this bit.) You then follow the signs to Emily Miller Beach (don't get this confused with Emily Miller Point.) Once there go down to the beach and depending on the boulder it may be on the next beach.

where to stay

You can stay at Murramarang resort (camping or in a Villa) or you could stay anywhere in Batemans Bay or areas nearby.

ethic

Some of the rocks are thin and may snap off, be cautious when climbing to minimise this.

1.8.3. Guerilla Bay 2 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -35.824960, 150.226986

summary

Small beachside bouldering on a unique little islet.

description

Large outcrop of rock just a short walk off the beach. Has a few boulder problems scattered across it and could be setup for top-roping with natural pro anchors.

A lot of the rock slopes pointing to the east at the top, so anything steeper is on the east face, but often means you'll end up getting wet if you fall which can be straight into the churning ocean.

access issues

Unable to find information on the outcrop itself, would not recommend placing any bolts (nor would it be necessary). Locals were around when first visited and didn't seem to care about people on the rocks.

approach

Turn off George Bass Road into Burri Point Rd following it down and taking the left onto Beach Parade Rd, you'll see an old wooden sign on the left hand side of the road pointing down a short road to the beach. Make sure not to park in front of the turn around point.

Instantly seen from the carpark, walk across the 20m spit connecting to the islet.

May not be accessible during high tide. Wade through thigh deep water to get to it on fairly flat ground and over some rocks.

where to stay

No camping here, but options not far away in caravan parks, airbnb etc

history

Nick Murphy decided to check it out in early 2020, though very likely others have looked here before

1.8.4. Bimbimbie 2 routes in Area

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -35.825620, 150.079190

summary

Bimbimbie is located in the Mogo State Forest.

description

Scattered, short granite boulders (3-8 metres high).

approach

Turn off Princess Highway at Milsons Road. Follow to junction of Bimbimbie and Cpt187/1 Road. 2 wheel drive okay to this point. Probably need a 4x4 beyond this point. GPS coordinates for Phoenix Crag/Princess Leah -35.8259558,150.0829297

ethic

Trad and bouldering only. No bolts.

history

Local Congo legends led the way on this one.

1.8.5. Moruya South Head 12 routes in Boulder

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -35.908657, 150.161416

description

A small bouldering spot on the South Headland.

Can be affected by high tides so be careful. Also be careful with pad placements as there's a ledge at the base of the majority of the climbs that can make falls difficult

approach

Head east at the roundabout in South Moruya on South Head Road. Follow all the way to the end and take a left onto Charles Moffitt Drive. Follow this around and turn left up the hill onto Coronation Drive and then go right onto Elizabeth St and go immediately right out towards the headland and park at the lookout point/cemetary.

Go left of the fence (you can look down onto the bouldering wall from the lookout) and follow the fishermans track down to the cliff line below. You'll see the area over to the right down a small scramble. 2 min walk in, be careful on the steep track down.

Not really accessible by public transport or walking from town.

history

Developed in January 2015 by Nick Murphy. Only several problems sent with potential for more

1.8.6. Mullimburra Point 1 route in Crag

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -35.993747, 150.161774

description

Collection of small cliffs surrounding Mullimburra Point just south of Moruya.

access issues

Unknown currently

approach

Follow Bingie Point Road off the highway and turn left onto Mullimburra Point Road and follow along to the very end carpark.

To access northern beach area there's a small track that leads down to the beach about 100m back from the carpark.

To access southern beach with the pinnacles walk back about 50m from carpark and look for obvious track heading down to the beach on the left.

where to stay

No Camping on the beaches or at the carpark.

ethic

Brush off your chalk and tick marks Don't place bolts Pick-up your rubbish or any that you find. No chipping or modifying holds

history

Scouted by Nick Murphy January 2020

1.8.7. Whale Beach 6 routes in Boulder

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -36.051490, 150.141348

description

A very small crag right on the water in Tuross Heads.

approach

Park near 27 Tuross Blvd and walk down to the obvious high boulders just south of the main beach. 1 min walk in.

history

Developed in Dec 2014 by Nick Murphy. Could've had previous ascents simply because of it's prominence but nothing marked or recorded.

1.8.8. Bodalla 0 routes in Unknown

description

A few boulders just off the highway, that may have some potential

1.8.9. Tuross gorge 6 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -36.215561, 149.555400

description

See the Tuross Falls Climbing guide hosted by Canberra Climbing Association

access issues

Seems to be in the National park, rather than Wadbilliga State Forest, apparently the rangers are/have been friendly

1.8.10. Tilba 0 routes in Area

summary

Two yet to be climbed near roadside crags near Central Tilba

description

Visible from the Princes Highway on both the eastern and western side are two granite looking outcrops of rock with good height and a variety of aspects and profiles that could present a small wonderland of route potential to those who make the journey there.

access issues

Both locations require crossing private land so owners must be contacted to seek permission before entering.

approach

Potential 1; Najanuga (Little Dromedary Mountain). See track notes at link; hikingtheworld.blog/2016/01/16/little-dromedary-najanuga/

Potential 2; Access is still being confirmed as it will be necessary to pass through private land.

where to stay

Central Tilba has a variety of options, as well as nearby beach stays are available.

1.8.11. Animal Docks 7 routes in Area

Summary:
Bouldering, Trad climbing and Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -36.377081, 150.080623

summary

Seaside bouldering and a few routes near some iconic and well photographed rocks

description

Climbing right near the heavily photographed Horse Head Rock and Camel Rock. A few free standing boulders on the beach as well as some of the cliffs surrounding them offering a lot of potential on decent schist rock.

access issues

Not recommended to climb on either of the prominent tourist attractions here as that would likely just be bad press, as well they don't have the rock quality the others do and both are surrounded by water at most times.

approach

Park at the Camel Rock Beach Carpark, walk down onto the sand and head north and you'll immediately see Camel Rock and other boulders about.

Continue north past Camel Rock and you'll eventually come to Horse Head Rock which is about the limit of the climbing here. May require some scrambling to get to Horse Head depending on the tides. Anything further north is complete choss.

where to stay

3 Caravan parks very nearby, the nearest has a brewery attached, the Camel Rock Brewery and Restaurant

ethic

No Bolting (as this will attract unwanted attention) Don't chip or modify holds, brush off your chalk and tick marks, be polite to tourists, don't climb on Horse Head Rock or Camel Rock, take any rubbish of yours or you find out with you.

history

Nick Murphy was probably not the first to come by here and climb anything, though haven't been able to find anything elsewhere talking about this area.

1.8.12. Birthday Bluffs 0 routes in Crag

description

On the west side of Mumbulla mountain, visible from the highway are several prominent bluffs that look promising.

access issues

Located within Biamanga National Park

approach

Likely by driving to the end of Stevensons Lane is the best way to access the crags. May require crossing private property so seek permission first.

where to stay

Very near to the large town of Bega which has plenty of options

history

I've heard rumors that these were called Birthday Bluffs, and had been climbed at some point prior to the 80s, but have found no further information

1.8.13. Biamanga Pools 0 routes in Area

description

access issues

Located within Biamanga National Park.

The Aboriginal custodians request that visitors, through respect, do not swim in the Mumbulla Falls area - a site that is sacred to the Yuin People.

1.8.14. Mimosa Rocks National Park 5 routes in Area

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -36.582363, 150.041784

description

Coastal boulders and short cliffs. Rock quality is variable

1.8.15. A Room with a View 5 routes in Boulder

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -36.730511, 149.989903

description

Cave about 3m deep, and between 1/1.5m high.

approach

Drive into Tathra and follow the main road down past the IGA. Turn right onto beach street. Go straight (this means that you keep going straight and turn off beach street) ahead when you get to the right hand turn in the road. It looks a bit like someone’s driveway, because it sort of is. Park on the left where there is a little walking track. Go right and follow the walking track. Follow the track around and take the second exit off to the left. Walk down the rocks and turn right...it’s the deep cave about a meter and a half high...you can’t miss it.

history

I have never seen another boulderer here...ever

1.8.16. Tura Head 41 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Bouldering

Lat / Long: -36.855789, 149.948518

summary

Sea cliff climbing and bouldering on hard volcanic rock.

description

Easy to access crag with a variety of styles, bouldering, trad lines and sport routes, with plenty still to be developed.

access issues

Unknown currently, looks to be on public land as there's a walking track here with a lookout and natural rock pool at the end of the headland.

approach

Park in the carpark just off Headland Dr and then follow the walking track heading east from here. Follow the main track without taking any of the side tracks and you'll reach the end of the headland.

where to stay

Plenty of options within Merimbula, Tura Head or Tathra. Don't camp at the crag!

history

Jaime Mesias had found pre-existing bolts from someone in 2019. Few routes added by Nick Murphy on an exploratory look in 2020.

1.8.17. Ben Boyd National Park 76 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -37.230051, 150.017953

description

Ben Boyd National Park is a seaside national park near Eden. It offers whale watching, fishing and beach camping.

where to stay

Beach camping is available in the national park.

1.8.18. Nadgee 3 routes in Area

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -37.333428, 149.926410

description

Nadgee Forest is south of Ben Boyd.

Sea cliff climbing on trad generally.

1.8.19. Narooma Fitness Centre 0 routes in Gym

description

8 Hopkins Place, Narooma, New South Wales

1.8.20. Rock On Fitness and Indoor Climbing 0 routes in Gym

description

http://www.rockonfitness.com.au/off-the-wall

38 Cranbrook Rd, Batemans Bay, NSW 2536

1.9. Central Tablelands 6,951 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.051810, 149.870332

1.9.1. Blue Mountains 6,340 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.572195, 150.373713

summary

Massive amounts of rock, easily accessible high quality routes in a beautiful location.

description

Driving up into the Blue Mountains is like entering a fortress, for once you are up in them, you are on a plateau surrounded on all sides by cliffs. It is in this almost suburban bush surrounding, that some of Australia's best climbing resides. From big adventurous walls, to smaller single pitch sport climbs, to fantastic trad climbing, the Blueys has a bit of it all. All this comes amidst the smoky blue green vistas of the Blueys, which on a good day are so peaceful you will never want to leave.

The Blue Mountains are a unique destination offering a very civilised climbing experience, courtesy of places like Katoomba and Blackheath, that sport a healthy cafe culture. The mornings can begin with a coffee in Blackheath and a visit to the bakery. The day can then be spent thrashing yourself on some of the countless sport routes, or scaring yourself silly on some sandy trad horror show. The evening can then culminate in Katoomba with a nice café meal and possibly a film. For a more traditional experience head to Mt Victoria for the pub, and the rickety old theatre. Most of the crags are within easy driving distance of each other, and in some cases easy walking distance. The most popular area is around Blackheath which offers the highest concentration of quality climbing to be found. There are many other areas though which are very good, most of which are within half an hour to an hours drive away. For most people these days, the Blueys is really a sport climbing destination. Apart from Nowra, there is no other place where you will find so many sport routes. There is still plenty of trad climbing though, even though the sandstone is not as suited to trad climbing as the Grampians and Mt Arapiles, being generally poorer in quality. Mt Piddington and Mt York are probably two of the best places to trad climb, although both crags offer some sport climbing. Around Blackheath the best sport area is Centennial Glen, although Upper Shipley probably offers more options for the intermediate climber.

For the beginner climber the Blue Mountains is nowhere near as good as Arapiles or the Grampians, as the easier routes do tend to be the chossier ones. For the intermediate to advanced climber though, the Blue Mountains is fantastic. The beginner climber should not be put off however, as the Blue Mountains probably has more climbing companies offering introductions to climbing than anywhere else in the country. The Blueys is a fantastic place to spend time, although it can be a little more expensive than other areas, due to having so many more temptations.

access issues

The Blue Mountains are a World Heritage listed area. The Grose Valley, the cliffs around Katoomba and much of the Narrow Neck peninsula are part of the Blue Mountains National Park which is managed by the NPWS. The Western Escarpment - where most of the climbing is - is Crown Land managed by the BMCC. While the NPWS Plan of Management nominates several locations in the National Park where rock climbing is deemed appropriate, the majority of the climbing remains unacknowledged. To maintain access our best approach is to 'Respect Native Habitat, Tread Softly and Leave No Trace'. Do not cut flora and keep any tracks and infrastructure as minimal as possible.

Practically all crags are either in National Park or in council reserve: dog owners are reminded that dogs are not allowed in National Parks at any time and fines have been issued, while for crags on council reserve the BMCC leash law requires that dogs be on-leash.

approach

An hour and a half’s drive west of Sydney (80kms). There is a train line that runs right across the top of the Blue Mountains plateau and many stations (e.g. Blackheath) are in very close proximity to the crags. There is also a bus service.

where to stay

Camping isn't fantastic; there are free campgrounds in the Megalong Valley, Mt York and Perrys Lookdown but they are a long way from the crags if you don't have a car and have limited facilities. Blackheath has a BMCC operated campground which offers security and showers and is in the centre of the main climbing hub. Katoomba has plenty of hostels and there are many bed and breakfast type places through the mountains, if you can afford it. It really is a place where a car is needed to make the best of the area.

ethic

Although sport climbing is well entrenched as the most popular form of Blueys climbing, mixed-climbing on gear and bolts has generally been the rule over the long term. Please try to use available natural gear where possible, and do not bolt cracks or potential trad climbs. If you do the bolts may be removed.

Because of the softness of Blue Mountains sandstone, bolting should only be done by those with a solid knowledge of glue-in equipping. A recent fatality serves as a reminder that this is not an area to experiment with bolting.

If you do need to top rope, please do it through your own gear as the wear on the anchors is both difficult and expensive to maintain.

If you have benefited from climbing infrastructure in NSW, please consider making a donation towards maintenance costs. The Sydney Rockclimbing Club Rebolting Fund finances the replacement of old bolts on existing climbs and the maintenance of other hardware such as fixed ropes and anchors. The SRC purchases hardware, such as bolts and glue, and distributes them to volunteer rebolters across the state of New South Wales. For more information, including donation details, visit https://sydneyrockies.org.au/rebolting/

It would be appreciated if brushing of holds becomes part of your climbing routine - do it with a soft bristled brush and never a steel brush!

The removal of vegetation - both from the cliff bases and the climbs - is not seen as beneficial to aesthetics of the environment nor to our access to it.

However, the fast growing scrub can conceal walking tracks in mere months, making remote and less popular crags slightly more difficult and fun to navigate to. Some appropriately discreet pruning is a far better alternative then track braiding (which causes far more damage).

However, do so only on Council land and definitely not in the National Park. Remember, to maintain access our best approach is to 'Respect Native Habitat, Tread Softly and Leave No Trace'. Do not cut flora and keep any tracks and infrastructure as minimal as possible or risk possible closures.

1.9.2. Wolgan Valley 455 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad climbing, Rock climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.226438, 150.252601

summary

Remote trad and mixed climbing in a stunning environment. Many truly excellent, long or multipitch routes on great rock. Great hiking, camping and canyoning for rest days.

approach

From Lithgow drive west on Great Western Highway for approx. 7 kms and take the Mudgee Road exit on left. Follow this the Wallerawang Power Station (on left) for several kms till an intersection (service station) where the Wolgan Road turns off to the right. It's about 35 kms to Newnes campground from here with the final several kms only being dirt road. Approach to various crags listed in their sections.

where to stay

Newnes campgrounds has numerous free sites on both sides of the river, with minimal toilet facilities spread about.

ethic

National Park. Trad climbing. Adventures...

history

Long and varied...

1.9.3. Capertee Valley 7 routes in Area

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -33.035609, 150.194375

description

Basically another Wolgan Valley, but bigger and possibly even more gobsmacking.

approach

Not much further to drive than Newnes due to faster roads.

ethic

Lots of climbing has been done but tends not to be written up, to keep this as an adventure area.

1.9.4. Evans Crown Tarana 134 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad climbing, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -33.546530, 149.924686

summary

Fantastic granite climbing only 2 hours from Sydney

description

Evans Crown Nature Reserve (“Tarana” after the nearby hamlet of the same name) is a small (425ha) nature reserve in the Fish River grazing country on the Lithgow side of the Blue Mountains. It consists of a forested outcropping of granite domes and tors – and from a climber’s perspective, is the nearest quality granite climbing to Sydney, and a welcome change from the sandstone cliffs of the Blue Mountains. There are more than 120 established routes here, mostly dating back to the 1970s and ‘80s, often friction climbing on slabs, faces and steeper boulders and features. The three-dimensional climbing, sometimes heady runouts and beautiful setting all contribute to a unique climbing experience.

access issues

Evans Crown Tarana is a Nature Reserve administered by the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage. As a Nature Reserve (and unlike National Parks) the primary purpose of the administration is preservation of natural and cultural values, NOT recreation. While rock climbing is noted as a recreational use in the 2009 Plan of Management (this can be downloaded from http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/parkmanagement/EvansCrownMgmtplan.htm) it is not officially encouraged, and if the OEH believe the impact of climbing is detrimental to the natural or cultural values of the area, it can and will be banned.

The Parks and Wildlife Service requested at one stage that all climbers register their intention with them prior to climbing – this no longer seems to be the case. However, there is an existing ban on new routes, brushing or cleaning existing or new routes, no “gardening” or disturbing vegetation, no marking routes, and no camping or fires in the Reserve. No new bolts may be placed, and technically re-bolting is also forbidden.

So – in addition to the usual “Leave no Trace” guidance, please make every effort to minimise any signs of climbing activity in order to preserve our precarious access to this special place.

approach

From Sydney drive over the Blueys on the Great Western Highway towards Lithgow. As you reach the outskirts of Lithgow, turn left at the petrol station onto Rydal Road towards Lake Lyell. You'll eventually hit a T-intersection. Turn right and then left almost immediately onto Sodswalls-Tarana Rd - follow this for about 10 clicks through Sodwalls until you reach Honeysuckle Falls Road - a dirt road on your left.

About 1.5k up Honeysuckle Falls Road there is a small parking area in front of a "Evans Crown Nature Reserve" sign. Park here.

Head up the well-formed track for about 20 minutes until you hit the signposted intersection at the top. The unformed track to the left will immediately bring you to the front of Deckout Buttress.

where to stay

The Tarana Hotel has rustic cabin accommodation and basic meals - see http://www.taranahotel.com.au/ The more major township of Lithgow is only a short drive away with plenty of accommodation.

Free camping is available at Flat Rock campsite on the Fish River about 15 mins drive from Evans Crown - see http://www.australiancampsites.com.au/index.php/component/content/article?id=267:flat-rock

ethic

Given the restrictions on new routes, brushing and bolting, new route activity is limited to trad climbing, and the easy lines (and the hard ones!) have long ago been developed, for the most part. The casual visitor is probably advised to stick to the established climbs, there are plenty to go around. Many climbs in this guide are listed as "Sport" in that they are bolted climbs with no natural gear required (or available) - many of these are truly "sporting" with old-school runouts. Some of the "Trad" climbs have little or no protection, and were soloed on FA. Please be careful - top roping is often possible and often the only way to adequately protect a route.

history

Climbing at Tarana began when Dave Tanner, an old climbing partner of John Ewbank’s, visited the place in 1971 with people from the newly formed Bathurst climbing group. They did Tanner's Leap (13), the first recorded route here and the original route to the summit of Evans Crown. Some early experiments with bolting probably date back to this initial period, to - as the weird piece of ironmongery on top of the Crown and the mysterious series of boltholes up the chimney of Tanner's Leap testify. Other early routes by this group include the classic Barad Dur (13, M1), put up by Bob Douglas and Dave Tanner in 1973. In true guidebook tradition, the early history is very vague. However, it seems that the local climbers took Joe Friend and his companions Bill Watson and Pete Blackwood there sometime during 1973 and that, in various combinations, they did quite a few of the more obvious, easier crack routes.

The place lay dormant for a few years (or at least no more new routes were recorded), the only activity being Joe Friends first free ascent of Barad Dur at 18 in 1975. Around 1978/77 Friend lived in the district and initiated a revival of interest: many line new routes were done at grades up to 21. The main activist other than Friend was the young Mike Law, who led the nasty cracks, Chain Mail Crack (21) and Brain Savage (21) - the hardest routes here for quite a while—and the rather bold arête, Born Crazy (20), which he did with Andrew Penney. With Friend, Law also added the classic crack route, Spot the Brain Cell (19), and with Friend and Ben Ewald he did the first route up the main face of Googolplex Crag—2001 Bilbo Baggins (18). Friend led Sorcerer's Apprentice (16) as well as soloing many routes, the best of which was Shark Fin Special (15)—almost certainly from this period though exact details are long forgotten.

In 1977 Joe Friend brought out an unbound guide to the area which described about 35 routes, but descriptions and historical information were sketchy. What may have been done between then and 1987 has been lost. The cliff went out of fashion not long after the appearance of Friend's guide as the new age of bolting wall routes in the Blue Mountains began with a vengeance, so it seems safe to presume that little more was done until recently.

The next recorded activity was in February 1987. John Smoothy (Crunch) was becoming a little bored with the Blue Mountains, and took former New England granite climber, Mark Colyvan, to the cliff. The pair were amazed at the potential for bolt-protected slabs and walls, and quickly began work on new routes. The first bolts went into the short slab, Bloodbath (20), led by Colyvan, and the pumpy crack, Belly Acres (23), by Crunch. Giles Bradbury tagged along on the latter and got into the act in his own right the following week with a newly acquired power drill on the classic Dr Martens Boots (21) and the desperately smooth slab, Roller Disco (23). The same day, Colyvan completed work on Six Days on the Toad (21) and led it, and Crunch added Sudden Impact (21) to Deckout Buttress, where he had done Splat (18) and Kersplat (17) during the preceding week. Crunch’s enthusiastic burst continued. The main face of Googolplex Crag yielded This 0ne‘s For Evelyn (22) and Desperately Seeking Evan (20), and on the boulders on the ridge he did Maverick (21)—yet another good, bolt protected wall.

Meanwhile Colyvan had been preparing for the classic two-pitch arête, The Howling (23), which he did with Geoff Robertson during April. ln September that year, visiting Queenslander Scott Camps did Scabby Lizards (21) on Deckout Buttress, and Crunch added Madonnas (19) nearby; both are good, slabby wall climbs. Towards the end for the year, another former New Englander, Paul Bayne, was introduced to the area. Over the remainder of the year and into the next he was to do some significant new routes, including the middle-grade classic, Fuzzy Navel (18), Shelf Life (21), and the shorter wall route, Small Pox Wall (19). in early 1988 Mark Colyvan climbed the prominent dyke on Crown Buttress to give Sea of Heartbreak (22), while Jo Monaghan and Fiona Lumsden put up the beginners’ classic, Passionate Pleasantries (14), on Googolplex Crag. In January 1988 Colyvan published a Photostat guide containing about 60 routes.

Shortly after this, Paul Colyvan (another former New Englander) was taken to Tarana and added a long-awaited second pitch to Desperately Seeking Evan—the rather scary Finger Tight (23). Mike Law also sprang back into action at about this time. Hoping to redeem himself for past deeds in cracks, he added Ice (23), Spouse (26), and Twitching for Jesus (24) to the growing list of slab routes here. Meanwhile, Joy Fletcher put up Your Neighbourhood Bolter (16) on Crown Buttress.

By this time Tarana had become a very fashionable place to be (and be seen). Everyone who was nobody was there with Lycra tights, power drill and adolescent ego, but few had vision enough to add any significant new routes to the crag. One exception was Gordon de Lacy, who added Ride of the Valkyries (24) to the Neurone Circuit and a few months later did a classic two-pitch 23, Mr Sheen, on Googolplex Crag. David Haines and Mike Ellims added a few worthwhile routes such as Optem Bop (16) (by Ellims) and Bury Me Deep in Love (23) (by Haines), both in the Goog Gap area. The only other significant addition in 1988 was Crunch's classic on Googolplex Crag, A Ticklish Affair (24).

During 1989 the Mt York Principle (between any two routes there is potential for at least one more) was applied to Deckout Buttress to squeeze from it every route possible. in the process, existing routes were bolted and brushed, presumably because those responsible were either too lazy to find out whether these routes had been done before or too stupid to realize that bolting other people's routes wouldn't earn them a place in the guide.

Leaving all that ugliness aside, there were some good new routes done in 1989. Deckout Buttress acquired The Owl and the Pussycat (21), put up by Andrew Penney in January, and Polkagris (21), by Carl-Joan Jagusch in February. Paul Colyvan did the route to the right of The Howling's second pitch and called it Rubber Nuns (26). Damien Taylor managed a couple of good additions to the Neurone Circuit—Men of Vision (22) in February, and High-rise Wombat (23) in April. in March, Mike Stacey succeeded on Thrashing the Mullet Gun (22) and Andrew Penney did Laughing Boy Morris (21): both are on Googolplex Crag. Later in the year on the same crag, Rick Stiles did Rene's Ethical Neutrality (20) and Andrew Penney (who had been busy here much of the year) did God Help the Hash House Harriers (21).

At the time of writing there were 112 routes at Evans Crown, 52 of them added in the two years since the publication of the last guide.

[Transcribers note – above history transcribed from Mark Colyvan’s “Evans Crown Tarana – A Rock guide” published by Wild Publications, 1990, with permission from the author. Due to environmental sensitivities and a ban on new bolting, very little new route development has taken place here since then – that anyone has recorded, anyway. Please see “Access Issues” section before considering any new route activity.]

1.9.5. Oberon 12 routes in Area

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -33.719170, 149.840119

summary

Lot of granite bouldering & tors

description

Part of the extensive granite belt in this area

1.9.6. Mt Canobolas 3 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -33.371659, 148.988977

description

Mount Canobolas is a 1390 metre high mountain formed from an extinct volcano in the Great Dividing Range in Central New South Wales. The mountain is located in Mount Canobolas State Conservation Area.

access issues

Located in Mount Canobolas State Conservation area.

approach

The summit is accessible via the Summits Walking Track.

1.10. Southern Tablelands 1,715 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -34.821083, 149.560756

1.10.1. Cinderella Crag 24 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -34.265714, 150.547712

summary

A sport-climbing crag up steep white and orange sandstone. It is full of features and up to 40 metres in height. French translation of Cinderella is "of the ashes"

description

Crag gets morning sun, and shade after about 1pm. The base of the crag is a bit of a dustbowl - bring a large rope tarp. The crag also appears to heavily seep after extended rain.

access issues

None… Until they lock the fire road gate then expect a long walk or bike ride. Keep a low profile when drilling, there are some people lurking around the fire trails on the weekends. Well maintained fire trail access is fine with a 2WD with good clearance

approach

From Sydney, get on the M31 freeway and head south, take the Bargo exit. From here locate Avon Dam road and follow this for 3.5 km, cross the railway and turn left into Bargo River Rd and continue for a further 4.5km until your speedo reads 8km. I think the road changes its name somewhere along this section of road to Wilson Drive Reset your speedo here at house number 392. or - Type up "392 Wilson Dr, Balmoral NSW 2571" in Google Maps and reset your speedo here.

Turn left opposite the house and cross the rail

0.1km - Cross the railway

0.8km - Pass thru open gate and continue along dirt fire trail for 4.5km (just under 10min drive)

5.3km - Arrive at commuter car park

From here its an easy 2 min walk to the crag (follow the grey tape in the trees)

where to stay

Camping is possible at the top of the crag.

ethic

Ring bolted sport routes with lower offs

history

Discovered by Mark Farrell 15 years ago. Simon Vaughan given a pass after much badgering.

1.10.2. Bargo Crag 77 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

summary

Big orange walls with an atmospheric feel.

ethic

If bolting new routes please avoid squeeze jobs, linkups or variant starts/finishes. There is enough rock for lots of independent lines. Go for a walk! If your proposed line comes within 3m of an established route, please ask the person whose route it is so as not to devalue their original vision. Avoid damaging any vegetation in this area. No dogs or camping.

1.10.3. Bungonia Gorge 299 routes in Crag

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -34.825203, 150.017957

summary

Limestone gorge two hours from Sydney, three from the blue mountains. Need I say more. Only 1.5hrs from Canberra

description

Up to 300m limestone multi-pitch climbing with single pitch sport and bouldering at the base. Some shorter climbs are on scattered crags at the top of the gorge (Reflux Crag, SRC Crag). Rap-in, climb-out area at Cooee Point.

access issues

The park is occasionally closed for feral animal control. Check here: http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/alert/state-alerts

approach

For the main deal, drive to the end of "The Lookdown road" and park 200m before the lookout at the toilets. Take the walking track called "Red track" around the gate, on the left as you come in. Then 30-40 min steep walk down into the slot canyon. (Check the map at the carpark to make sure your heading the right way down the 5hr "Red track" circuit.)

Cooee Point, Reflux Crag and SRC Crag are a 15 minute walk from the lookout, if you find your way OK.

where to stay

1.10.4. Nerriga 105 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -35.056149, 150.136836

description

Soft sandstone cliffs, generally cooler than Nowra, and far less crowded. It sees less traffic, so take a brush, and keep an eye out for loose holds.

access issues

The crag is located in Morton National Park, so the usual rules apply.

approach

The climbing areas are split by the Braidwood road. There are two parking spots depending on which side of the road you wish to climb on.

From Canberra/Nerriga, drive 6.8KM east of Nerriga on the Braidwood Road. Cliffs will rise from the roadside as the road steepens. The main area parking is on the left (North) side of the road after a large embankment and immediately below some cliffs before a large rising road bridge.

From Nowra, drive along the Braidwood road passing Tianjara falls and Sasafrass. At the edge of the escarpment the road will drop as you see the cliff line. Parking is on the right just after crossing a descending road bridge.

The main parking area is immediately next to the road, it has recently been asphalted making it more obvious and is suitable for all vehicle’s. See individual areas for best access from here. It is also possible to park out of sight across the road.

The less popular “The Gym and environs” are on the south side of the road can be accessed by walking along a power line access road from the top of the hill. Park on the top of the rise 400m uphill from the main parking area. From here cross the road, jump up the rock ledge and follow the phone line markers along the rocky area to the power line access road. Follow this to just before the power lines. Leave the path and find the steep decent gully between Meat Slab and Mexico Wall. The gully uses a tree and rungs down low.

ethic

Standard Nowra, bolts everywhere but make sure you know how to place them and always use glue-ins

1.10.5. Bundanoon Bouldering 12 routes in Area

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -34.676542, 150.293658

summary

some small pockets of good quality bouldering

description

the area of Morten National Park accessible through Bundanoon is littered with cliff lines, although most of the rock quality is poor there are a few isolated areas that have gsolid and interesting rock. rock

access issues

from the main street of bundanoon take church street, onto gullies road, all the way to gambells rest.there is a park entrance fee but the access to the coal mine boulders are close to the park entrance, so it is possible to park outside the park.

where to stay

Camping available at Gambells rest. Bundanoon YHA is just down the road and features a bouldering wall and a small mountainbike track

ethic

National Park so keep impacts to minimum

history

developed in 2011

1.10.6. The Monastery 94 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Bouldering

Lat / Long: -34.676711, 150.254944

summary

Compact set of sandstone boulders with mostly good landings. A few short bolted routes. Boulders are generally sandy and often covered in the ubiquitous red moss. Bring a soft-bristled brush!

description

The Monastery is a compact collection of sandstone boulders and walls along the base of a small cliff beside the reclaimed site of the old Penrose rubbish dump. There is a lot of rock in the area and no doubt many more fantastic bouldering areas are awaiting discovery nearby.

access issues

The dirt track mentioned in the approach section is 2WD accessible but often covered in fallen branches. If your vehicle has low clearance, the turn off onto the dirt track from Teudts road may be difficult.

approach

From the town of Bundanoon (great for a morning coffee and breakfast before a day at the crag)head towards the town of Penrose on Penrose Road. 3.4 kilometres out of Bundanoon turn left onto Teudts Road. After 400 metres down Teudts Road you will see a small dirt track on your left. Turn in here and follow it along just past the old site of the rubbish dump (now a grass field) just on your left.

history

It first saw climbers visit in the early 1990’s with Adam Herdman and Pat Butler nabbing a few of the classic roadside face climbs but then more recently saw extensive development by Chas Ruffles, Ian Phillips, Ryan Winn, the Zuchetto Brothers, Phil Staples and more.

The area was burnt in the 2019-2020 summer fires but most problems appear to be unaffected. The following photo shows what the area looks like in June 2020.

1.10.7. Wingello 175 routes in Crag

Access: Moreton fire affecting access

The Moreton Fire has closed Wingello State Forest (https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/closures/wingello-state-forest-closed-due-to-fire-impact) Don't climb here.

See warning details and discuss

Created 9 months ago - Edited 5 months ago
Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -34.703758, 150.205039

summary

Wingello has a good variety of climbing combined with fairly easy access and camping which make for a fantastic weekend away. If a day trip is more to your liking, Wingello is only an hour down the freeway from Liverpool in South Western Sydney. So it is well within the 2 hour day trip limit.

description

The crag is located in a great location over looking beautiful bushland about 20 minutes out of Wingello. The best coffee in Wingello is served at the Wingello Village store, which is located just over the railway tracks in the down town metropolis. They also sell pies, bread and basic lunch supplies. Open seven days. They open early on weekdays, but 8am on Saturdays. The walls of Supa Fun Happy and La Paz have some fantastic climbing with amazing almost Grampians like sandstone. Supa Fun Happy is a good wall to start at with a good mix of grades.

Sydney climbing has a detailed guide of the Gulp Rd area at http://www.sydneyclimbing.com/confluence/download/attachments/5406966/Wingello+Climbing+Guide.pdf?version=2&modificationDate=1302047466000

access issues

In 2013 National Parks erected a locked gate 200m from the fire fighters memorial and placed several very large boulders on the road at the entrance of the memorial. Park in the designated car park to avoid blocking the gate or being blocked in by other users.

From Sydney: Wingello is about 1 hour from the M7/M5 intersection and the crag itself is about 20 minutes out of Wingello (depending on your car). Wingello is best reached (from Sydney) by busting straight down the Hume Hwy to the turn off just after the Paddy’s River bridge. You can also go through Bundanoon but its probably a bit slower. From Macca’s on the Freeway its 11.5km to the Wingello turn off, and another 8km from there to the Wingello Railway Crossing. Reset your speedo on the railway line or at the shop .

From Canberra:

Reset Speedo at NSW Border on Federal Highway. The BP at Marulan is 110kms or 1hr drive. Wingello turn off is 124.7km or 1hr 10 mins. The railway crossing at Wingello is 131.6km or 1 hr 15mins.

approach

Detailed Directions from Wingello

  1. (0.0km) - Cross the railway track and turn right. Stop at General Store for supplies or lunch. Grab a coffee and a pie.

  2. (0.1km)- Take 1st LEFT onto Forest Road.

  3. (2.8km)- Continue along into Wingello State Forest,, past the state forest sign.

  4. (4.2km)- Turn RIGHT into Running Creek Road at campground ie. The grassy area between the tall trees

  5. (4.4km)- Turn LEFT about 100m later into Gulp Road

  6. (4.8km)- Veer leftish onto smaller looking road (its still Gulp Road) at first intersection

  7. (5.5km)- Veer right at next ‘V’ intersection

  8. (8.6km)- Take the LEFT most track at the clearing with the big tree. There is a sign "Morton National Park" at this point. The track gets a little rough from here but is ok for 2wd with a little care. Please ensure you get someone to check your vehicles ground clearance when going over the sharp rises.

  9. (10.9km)- Arrive at a fenced carpark with large gate at the northern end. Park here, grab your gear and walk through the gate to the fireman’s memorial.

  10. Take the LEFT fire trail down the very steep hill.

  11. Eastern Access: After approximately 200m down the hill is a track on the right, this track is to access the cliff from the eastern end. Follow this track for 150m till a small cairn marks the track decent down on the left, follow over a some rock drops and down to a gully.

  12. Western Access: (Super Fun Happy Wall, etc) Continue straight down hill to a large flat rock platform. (Tape used to marks most of the trail but if in doubt just follow the cliff line until you come across the access gully). A small cairn marks the track on the right of the platform. Follow down for 100m till you reach some fixed ropes and rungs. The walk in to this access gully takes approx 20 mins from the car.

1.10.8. Badgerys Lookout 23 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad climbing, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -34.772756, 150.100828

summary

Badgerys Lookout offers stunning views of the Shoalhaven River.

description

A great crag with a variety of routes from 10m to 25m Carrot bolts, bring your bolt plates to get the most out of the climbs.

access issues

A very easy walk from the carpark to the bottom of the crag. Less than 2 minutes.

approach

From Tallong, turn right onto Caoura Road for three kilometres, then turn right onto Badgerys Lookout Road and follow to the end (approximately four kilometres). Sealed road. Take the track next to the Badgery’s Spur walking trail sign. Follow the path with the cliffs on your left until you come across a small easy gully. Scramble down and keep left along the cliff band. Should take less than 5 minutes.

where to stay

Free camping at Badgery’s Lookout

ethic

A mixture of trad, bolts and old carrot bolts.

1.10.9. Belanglo State Forest 60 routes in Area

Summary:
Sport climbing, Rock climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -34.530091, 150.219281

summary

Belanglo State Forest is predominately a pine plantation with some areas of native forest around the edges

description

Just over an hour from Sydney, it is a popular recreation spot. Forests in this area are a mixture of pine plantations and native forests. The first radiata pines were planted in this area in Belanglo State Forest in 1919.

1.10.10. Binalong 296 routes in Area

Summary:
Mostly Bouldering

Lat / Long: -34.672601, 148.621686

summary

A nearby boulder field.

description

Binalong is a small village with a population of approximately 460 people in the Southern Tablelands Region of New South Wales. A nearby bouldering area is about all you're likely to find here, but there's some possibility of climbing nearby, particularly a cliff on private property that looks to be ~15 metres high.

approach

Binalong is easily accessible by car via Burleigh Griffin Way.

1.10.11. Berrima Bouldering. 33 routes in Area

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -34.487536, 150.331715

summary

Quarried edges along the Wingecarribee River. Perfect for an afternoon out with the family, followed by a trip to the ice cream shop or the pub.

description

Short outcrops quarried for building the local churches etc. Explored numerous times by generations of climbers. Short with good landings.

access issues

None but the problems are on a public path frequented by dog walkers ,tourists and bird watchers. Limit use of chalk, carry out rubbish, etc,etc.

approach

Park in the centre of town, pick up a coffee in any one of the excellent cafes and walk 2 minutes down The Quarry Path, Berrima.

ethic

All of the routes will have been done at sometime or other. Keep chalk to a minimum and clean conservatively.

history

Routes are not named as they will have been done numerous times. Climbed by Gavin Murray and Simon Vaughan in the 80’s, cleaned and climbed by Tranter and Harvey in the 2000’s and numerous people since.

1.10.12. Mount Alexandra 129 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -34.442343, 150.456053

summary

Well developed sport climbing cliff line (up to 20m) with super easy access on the Southern Tablelands.

description

A great crag in Mittagong, an hour and twenty minutes drive from Sydney and a good change from Nowra. Climbs are mostly sports with the odd trad line thrown in. Faces north west so can get a bit hot during summer, but because of the altitude tends to stay cooler than Nowra.

access issues

Located in the Mount Alexandra Reserve, under stewardship of the Wingecarribee Shire Council.

approach

  • Exit the M31 Hume Motorway in either a Northerly or Southerly direction at the Mittagong Exits
  • Turn off North at Victoria Street which is right in the middle of the town centre
  • At the end of Victoria Street continue up the steep Mount Alexandra Lookout Road to reach the crag carpark
  • Walk North across the other side of the carpark and follow a well worn walking trail to immediately find the start of the crag cliffs curving around to the right

1.10.13. Mount Alexandra Lookout Road bouldering. 22 routes in Area

Summary:
Mostly Bouldering

Lat / Long: -34.439951, 150.450760

summary

Low ball bouldering scattered across the hill side on the Mount Alexandra Lookout trail.

description

A maze of boulders with generally good landings. Being a new area, off the beaten track, brig a brush (or a flame thrower) to deal with the moss.

access issues

None.

approach

From the top left corner of Mount Alex car park head up the well marked fire trail. Less than 5 minutes steeply uphill a single boulder appears. Cut right up the ridge to the Castle Area. A further 200 metres up the ridge you will reach the Maze.

history

First cleaned in during the great plague of 2020.

1.10.14. Area 51 10 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad climbing and Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -34.440237, 150.457838

description

Useful Info: Area 51, also known as Groom Lake, is a secret military facility about 90 miles north of Las Vegas. The number refers to a 6-by-10-mile block of land, at the center of which is a large air base the government will not discuss. The site was selected in the mid-1950s for testing of the U-2 spyplane, due to its remoteness, proximity to existing facilities and presence of a dry lake bed for landings. Groom Lake is America's traditional testing ground for "black budget" aircraft before they are publicly acknowledged. The facility and surrounding areas are also associated -- with varying levels of credibility -- with UFO and conspiracy stories. In 1989, Bob Lazar claimed on a Las Vegas television station that he had worked with alien spacecraft at Papoose Lake, south of Area 51. Since then, "Area 51" has become a popular symbol for the alleged U.S. Government UFO cover-up.

Routes are described right to left as you approach the crag.

© (bundybear)

approach

Park at the Gym/Swimming Pool Carpark.

Head straight up the hill on foot, passing the gym until you reach the fire access road (about 20 metres past the gym). There is a sign calling it the RED Track.

Follow this road down hill as it runs beside the Nattai River (looks more like a creek). After four or five minutes you should see a wooden post painted white on the bottom and red on top on the left side of the fire access road.

Walk 108 steps past this and then turn right off the road into bush down towards the river. Look for yellow tape on trees and cairns to guide the way.

Cross river easily and walk up steep hill veering gradually left as you go. Head up towards the cliffs at the top (about three to five minutes).

When you get to the cliff turn left and look for the ring bolts about five to ten metres along cliff. The first climb you come to is 'Butch'. This is a new crag so expect some loose rock for a while.

© (bundybear)

1.10.15. Mt Gibraltar 61 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing and Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -34.462256, 150.427396

description

Mount Gibraltar is an 863 metre high mountain in the Southern Highlands Region of New South Wales. The mountain is thought to have been formed from a collapsed volcano core. The rock type is called Mount Gibraltar Trachyte, or alternatively, micro-syenite. It is the most prominent peak in the Mount Gibraltar Reserve.

access issues

Located in the Mount Gibraltar Reserve.

approach

Mount Gibraltar is accessible by car via Oxley Drive.

1.10.16. Hillbilly Highway Walls 7 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing and Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -34.340454, 150.205205

summary

Amphitheatre of scallops, scoops and flutings 30 metres in height and with a seductive steepness

description

Small crag with limited development but potential for loads of quality long hard routes. Some previous development in the area.

access issues

As with all local crags. Park well, keep clean and quiet.

approach

2 minute walk in. Close to the coffee shops of Berrima.

ethic

Bolted crag.

1.10.17. Wollondilly River Valley 89 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -34.290959, 150.098148

description

The valley of the Wollindilly River provides a stimulating environment for those who prefer to climb without being able to belay off the bumper-bar of their car. With the crags situated on the crests of the ridges of rather steep and well vegetated valley sides, the silver glow of the river below, with only a handful of buildings in sight, a great feeling of mountain wilderness is experienced.

approach

Two major crags, Perpendicular Rock and Lanagan's Falls, are located at Goodmans Ford, a crossing of the Wollondilly River. From Sydney, take the Hume Highway south to Mittagong. Pass through the township on the old highway till the Wombeyan Caves Road (on your right) is reached. [That was 1998, might have changed] Turn onto this and follow it for 45 kilometres to the Wollondilly River. The road is not completely sealed and is narrow and windy as it descends into the river valley.

where to stay

There is a commercial campground just down the hill. More basic camping can be had on the river bank south of the bridge. The farmer/owner charges for such camping. A great view of Perpendicular Rock can be had from this area.

history

Copied verbatim from Harry Luxford's 1998 guide "Hot Rock, Climbs on Granitic Rock Around Sydney" (with permission). Additional information from "An Interim Guide to Rockclimbs at The Wollondilly (1984)" also by Harry.

1.10.18. The Loony Bin 15 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing, Rock climbing and Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -34.683176, 150.497443

summary

Great rock. All the starts are hard, most routes have a roof or two.

description

12 metre high wall capped with a roof in most places. Vertical to steep routes on beautiful rock. Routes described left to right.

access issues

National park land so take care with new routes. Park at the 2nd Shoalhaven sign as you leave Fitzroy Fall.

approach

Park at the 4 wooden poles marking a substantial track just before to first hairpin on the pass. (left hand side as you go towards Kangaroo Valley.)

ethic

Bolts.

1.10.19. The Sanctuary 33 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing, Rock climbing and Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -34.441897, 150.443909

summary

Easy access, a good alternative to Mt Alex if you live in the Southern Highlands.

Stays in shade until midday in the summer.

description

A collection of cliffs from 10 to 20 metres in height overlooking a picturesque valley.

access issues

Take care parking on the access road and close the gate if open.

approach

Turn left onto Bessemers road at the traffic lights near the Mittagong RSL. Turn left on to Sunset Point Drive and park near 64. Walk through the gate, contine straight down fire trail, passing rock steps until the river is reached. Turn left to the valley floor. Turn right steeply uphill for 2 minutes until the crag can be seen above you on the right. OR Follow the directions from Lake Mittagong below - slightly longer but easy to find.

1.10.20. Penrose Forest 96 routes in Area

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -34.632245, 150.227473

summary

Penrose State Forest is one of the most well-known forests in NSW, given its location on either side of the Hume Highway just over an hour from Sydney.

description

A collection of unclimbed sandstone crags up to 15m in height. Get out there and star claiming some routes! For up to date forest information check out http://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/penrose

access issues

All crags are accessed by forestry trails. 2wd vehicles will be fine.

history

Located and added to The Crag by Adam Rabjohns in Aug 2017

1.10.21. Goulburn & Surrounds 43 routes in Area

Summary:
Bouldering, Deep water soloing and other styles

Lat / Long: -34.674873, 149.653410

1.10.22. wild wild west 12 routes in Area

Summary:
All Trad climbing

summary

full details will be added at a later date, dont ask where it is

1.11. Australian Capital Territory 3,487 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -35.447128, 149.068313

description

Generally - must love granite. The ACT is ringed with a large number of cliffs - for such a small geographical area - the majority of which are granite. Trad and mixed climbing is a focus, with Booroomba Rocks, Gibraltar Peak, Orroral Ridge and other such granite areas presenting opportunities for single and multi-pitch climbing up to hundreds of metres tall. Many of them also present interesting opportunities to test the mental faculties above large runouts as well!

However, don't be fooled by the name of the local guide (ACT Granite), sport climbing on other types of rock is by no means unrepresented in the area with a number of crags such as Red Rocks and those to be found in the Mount Coree area providing opportunities for late teen to late grade twenty climbing on river-style rhyolite rock. The ACT currently has climbs of grades up to 28/29, with the opportunity to free some (very) old aid climbs and move the route grades into the 30s. Bouldering is up to V11/12. Climbers new to granite, slab and/or crack climbing are encouraged to jump on a few lower grade climbs before throwing themselves headlong into an epic!

Climbing is fairly accessible in the ACT, with both Kambah Rocks and Red Rocks within easy reach of the city itself. A number of other crags close to the city have either seen access closed (Ginninderra Falls, Michelago) or have fallen off the radar of current climbers in favour of the established granite cliffs and tors.

Bouldering in the area is mostly on granite and generally quite accessible, particularly Cooleman Ridge. For a break from small granite crimps, a reasonable number of boulder problems can also be found at Red Rocks. There is reasonable potential for new problems in a number of areas around the ACT.

If you are having difficulty finding the areas - and some can be very difficult to find, the following link may be of use:

http://maps.google.com.au/maps/ms?hl=en&ie=UTF8&t=p&msa=0&msid=202220939889529959331.0004614316914ba5e0cf2&ll=-35.469618,149.136658&spn=1.263842,2.103882&z=9

1.11.1. Canberra 456 routes in Area

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -35.287578, 149.085764

summary

The perfect crags for those summer afternoons after work.

description

Crags and areas close to civilisation, none will take you more than an hour city to crag.

There's something here to suit most people, granite bouldering, river crags, retaining wall traverses and several indoor gyms.

1.11.2. Queanbeyan area 527 routes in Area

Summary:
Mostly Bouldering

Lat / Long: -35.409997, 149.328382

summary

The draw here is Black Range, hundreds of granite boulder problems set in Tallaganda National Park.

It stays a few degrees cooler than Canberra all year round.

approach

Head out of Canberra towards Queanbeyan and follow the directions for the sub areas

1.11.3. Mt Coree area 164 routes in Area

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -35.345411, 148.858625

1.11.4. Tidbinbilla area 1,213 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -35.452261, 148.910668

summary

30 minutes from Canberra, the granite boulders offer a variety of climbing, mostly set in state forest

description

West of Canberra, on the other side of Bullen Range you can find Tidbinbilla nature reserve and the deep space tracking station.

Surrounding these are a large number of granite boulders and crags up to 20 meters in height.

You can find great bouldering, with some trad, sport and aid routes for variety as well.

approach

Head out of town via Cotter road from Weston, or Point Hut road from Lanyon.

Directions can be found at the subarea level.

where to stay

Cotter campground is the closest accommodation if you want to camp, otherwise Canberra is only 30 minutes away

1.11.5. Orroral area 1,037 routes in Area

Access: Namadgi fire closure

Booroomba rocks and Orroral ridge (e.g., Legoland) were heavily impacted by the 27 Jan 2020 Orroral valley fire (and were already closed prior to this due to fire danger throughout Namadgi and ACT).

These areas are expected to re-open in late 2021 (as of mid-2020), pending major restorations to roads and walking tracks. Refer to Honeysuckle section of Namadgi recovery plan at environment.act.gov.au.

See warning details and discuss

Created 9 months ago - Edited 3 months ago
Summary:
Trad climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -35.599173, 149.015553

summary

The best area in the ACT if you love granite and/or trad, contains the classic ACT crags Booroomba and Orroral ridge

1.11.6. Southern ACT 90 routes in Crag

Access: Orroral Fire and Bimberi Wilderness Closure

The Orroral Valley Fire, which began on the 27 January, has been declared extinguished as of 27 February 2020. The fire burnt over 80% of Namadgi National Park, which remains closed until further notice. This includes all the crags in this section.

The Bimberi Wilderness (a remote part of southern Namadgi) was also closed due to fire risk until further notice. Please respect this closure. Most of the crags under this section (Mount Gudgenby, Mount Scabby, Rendezvous Creek Pinnacle etc.) are within the Bimberi Wilderness area. For more information please see https://www.environment.act.gov.au/home/home-news-listing/bimberi-wilderness-closed-for-public-safety

See warning details and discuss

Created 9 months ago - Edited 8 months ago
Summary:
Trad climbing, Sport climbing and Aid climbing

Lat / Long: -35.760517, 148.950620

description

Contains the areas south of ACT including Mount Scabby, but not including Michelago (see River Crags for the limestone crag in Michelago).

1.12. Snowy Mountains 187 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -36.358254, 148.866281

1.12.1. Barry Way 0 routes in Area

1.12.2. Blue Lake 86 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad climbing, Ice climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -36.403617, 148.313099

summary

Quality crack climbing in an alpine setting.

Good winter climbing as well depending on conditions. Ice flows form further right from the Amphitheatre most years, and the rock buttresses also sometime

©

description

Granite cliffs overlooking the west side of Blue Lake.

Winter ice on the slopes north of the lake. Winter mixed on the rock buttresses.

©

approach

From Charlotte's Pass, follow the paved and gravelled tourist track towards Blue Lake. From the "helicopter landing pad" at the saddle overlooking the lake, follow the rocky tourist track down towards the lake. Twenty metres past the lookout platform, and 10 metres past a "no walking" sign, pick up a footpad heading down and around to the cliffs.

Winter access from CP can be expensive, though it is shorter walk. Usual winter access is from Guthega via the Illawong Track out and across suspension bridge, or just cross the creek for fun, then west towards Bel Lake.

©

where to stay

No camping in the glacial lake catchment. The closest flat spot out of the catchment is near the creek crossing on the tourist track, just downhill from the "helicopter landing pad".

Numerous winter camping spots available everywhere from staying low round Twynham Creek, or further up in treeline, on higher still on west side of exclusion zone that runs along Crummer Spur, Little Twynham and Twynham. Nice protected col below the Twynhams... Snow cave options are possible.

©

ethic

No bolts - trad climbing only.

©

history

Blue Lake has a unique place in Australian climbing and it is a great shame that for so long it has been lacking a comprehensive guide. Tony Wood and the A.N.U.M.C. put out the first guide in 1971 and Warrick Williams (and the U.N.S.W.M.C.) released revisions and supplements in 1973 and 1977. What you are about to read is the first attempt at a revision/update in twelve years. Consider yourself lucky that you are reading it at all, for this 'guide' has had an uneasy birth. What should have been a relatively painless publication has been plagued by apathy and non-commitment. Lies have been told, letters have been sent and not answered phone calls have been ignored, route descriptions have been lost (or never recorded) and deciphering twenty year old route descriptions has proved worthy of a degree. Anyway here it is complete with gaps and descriptions that may lead you into the never-never but what the hell you probably need some adventure in your life. "Printed in Issue #6 (Spring 1989) of Australian ROCKCLIMBER magazine."

©

1.12.3. Club Lake 4 routes in Area

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -36.412308, 148.291251

1.12.4. Cooma 0 routes in Region

summary

Close to Cooma

description

There are a few short cliffs that have seen development over the years

access issues

Used to be mostly public land - but check yourself

1.12.5. Cootralantra 10 routes in Area

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -36.290507, 148.808401

summary

Thousands of granite boulders across the open plains.

access issues

These boulders are on private land. Please respect the landowners and gain permission before entering or establishing any new problems.

approach

25 minutes from Cooma, about an hour and a half from Canberra.

1.12.6. Jindabyne 57 routes in Area

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -36.422798, 148.614715

1.12.7. Mount Clarke 8 routes in Area

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -36.432458, 148.295287

summary

Not really climbing, more like steep bushwalking! Tony Wood and friends visited the area over two decades ago, climbed a few things then to their credit decided not to record any of their rambles. Two route descriptions have slipped through and are included here for historical completeness.

1.12.8. Mount Townsend 2 routes in Area

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -36.423465, 148.258688

summary

Once again a pretty setting but nothing really worthwhile in the way of existing routes. On the Lake Albina side there is a broken buttress about 100m high with a couple of seams running up it. These were climbed by Peter Hopkins in 1987 at grade

20.

1.12.9. Nimmitabel 5 routes in Unknown

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -36.584325, 149.335033

1.12.10. Snowy gum Tomb 0 routes in Boulder

description

Short fun bolder across snowy river when doing walk from charlottes pass to Thredbo

approach

Look for dead snowy gun tree sprouting out behind bolder just pass Illawong lodge

1.12.11. Perisher Blue 14 routes in Area

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -36.396624, 148.405136

1.12.12. Ramshead Range 1 route in Unknown

Summary:
All Ice climbing

Lat / Long: -36.492972, 148.257793

description

The Ramshead Range is part of the Snowy Mountains in New South Wales, Australia. It extends from Dead Horse Gap in the south (near the New South Wales-Victoria state border) towards Thredbo. It is not far south of Mount Kosciuszko, the highest mainland point in Australia. The peaks of the range are around 2,100 m in altitude and the range is generally covered in snow from June through to October, making it suitable for winter climbing. The range is most commonly accessed from Dead Horse Gap or by the Kosciuszko Express Quad Chair at Thredbo. The number of peaks in the Ramshead Range is debatable: however it is commonly accepted that the South Ramshead, the Ramshead proper and the North Ramshead are all proper peaks. The peak between Ramshead and North Ramshead is sometimes known as the 'Central' Ramshead.

1.13. Northwest Slopes and plains 926 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -30.579909, 150.579352

1.13.1. Kaputar northern section 23 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -30.080128, 150.088070

description

These crags are still in Kaputar National Park but north of Killarney Gap road, near Sawn Rocks.

1.13.2. Kaputar 482 routes in Area

Summary:
Mostly Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -30.288759, 150.123201

summary

Mount Kaputar is on the edge of the NSW North West slopes on the Nandewar Range.

access issues

The road is suitable for 2WD vehicles but is steep, narrow and winding with part of the road gravel.

Caravans are not permitted.

approach

Mt Kaputar is approximately 50km NW of Narrabri.

where to stay

There are two camping areas at Mt Kaputar which offer unpowered sites. Both the Bark Hut and Dawson Springs camp grounds have hot water showers and toilets. Sites are paid for with a self-registration process at the grounds.

Dawson Springs also has three self contained cabins available to hire through the NPWS Narrabri office.

ethic

Endorsed by:
Peter Blunt, Ian Brown, Scott Camps, Richard Curtis, Taib Ezekiel, Angus Farquhar, Adrian Kladnig, Vanessa Wills (some of whom would have preferred a stronger position).

Retro-bolting at Kaputar

Since the first climbs were done in Mount Kaputar National Park in the 1960s, it has been a predominantly trad climbing area. Until about ten years ago, most of the hundreds of established climbs were protected entirely with natural gear. A small number of climbs had one or two bolts, and a few independent, fully bolt-protected climbs had been done. The 80m north face of The Governor has been regarded as one of the premier trad crags in Australia, with more than 80 multi-pitch climbs, many of very high quality, mostly established in ground-up style and with only a few bolts in total (and often at the technical limit of the climbers).

Since about 2005, more bolt-protected climbs have been established, particularly on Euglah and then Mt Lindesay, then The Governor. At first these were independent of established trad climbs and on otherwise unprotectable rock. But over the past few years other climbers have been retro-bolting over the top of existing climbs. This practice began on Mt Lindesay and then extended onto the Governor.

On Lindesay, about 200 bolts were placed, most of which retro-bolt or impact on at least 20 existing climbs. Bolts were very close together and some bolted lines were only one metre apart. Many bolts were placed beside good placements for removable gear. Numerous chains were also installed at the cliff-top, and the climb grades were painted in large letters along the bottom. Some of the bolts were found to be dangerous – either glue-ins on which the glue never cured (and which pulled out by hand) or dangerously short ‘studs’.

These were not assessable without removing them. Some of the retro-bolted Lindesay climbs are on the bold side, while others are very well protected with natural gear.

On The Governor, at least 60 bolts were been placed which either retro-bolt existing climbs, or squeeze up very close to them. Natural lines on The Governor’s columnar structure tend be only a couple of metres apart, so any new bolted climbs will impact on adjacent trad routes. Eight climbs have been impacted, including the popular moderate classic Clandestiny, and it's start that gives access to five other climbs. Additional chain anchors have been installed at the cliff-top. Some of the new Governor bolts have also been found to be dangerous, including a chain anchor with un-cured glue.

The retro-bolting on both Mt Lindesay and The Governor was visually intrusive, using large stainless ring bolts or shiny stainless brackets.

The people who have done this retro-bolting are not known to have consulted with first ascensionists, other Kaputar climbers or NPWS. Some first ascensionists and other climbers are angry.

Action

A number of climbers who love the special qualities of Kaputar climbing became very concerned about this trend and joined together to take action. The objectives are to restore The Governor to a premier trad-only crag (i.e. no sport routes), and to remove impacts on pre-existing routes on Mt Lindesay (retro-bolting etc). Most of the offending new bolts have now been removed and patched on both cliffs and the remainder will be removed shortly. Painted grades have been cleaned off. This has taken lot of work, time and expense by a bunch of people. If any of the bolts removed from these climbs are replaced, they will also be removed. Any new retro-bolting will also be removed.

Why have we taken this action?

Because we believe the following:

  • Existing trad climbs and quality trad crags should be retained in their original condition. That means no retro-bolting and no bolting that impacts on the integrity, or ‘hanging space’, of natural lines. Good trad cliffs, and trad climbs in general, are limited resources which need protection.
  • Retro-bolting on established climbs should be opposed and rectified.
  • National parks exist to protect natural areas. Therefore the environmental impact of climbing should be minimised in national parks. Trad climbing is generally low in impact, consistent with other activities like remote bushwalking. The Plan of Management for Mt Kaputar National Park (2006, section 4.3.9, page 37 – emphasis added) states: The NPWS will provide information and guidance on Service policy to visitors wishing to undertake adventure activities in the park, and will require minimal impact use of the park for these activities.
  • Excessive and unsightly bolting or other climbing impacts in national parks risk attracting the disapproval of other park visitors and park authorities, and may threaten ongoing climber access to these areas.

Trad climbing at Kaputar

Trad climbing at Kaputar requires judgment and skill. Important skills include route-finding, down-climbing (when necessary) and finding and using natural gear placements - which are often small wires or cams/nuts in unexpected places. Kaputar is a good place to learn and apply these skills because it offers trad climbs at a wide range of grades.

Protection is often very good but not always obvious from below. Poor protection is usually mentioned in route descriptions, and/or allowed for in the grading (i.e. increased grade for poor protection). Bold routes on Mt Lindesay can be easily top-roped. Route descriptions on thecrag.com will be amended where necessary to assist safe climbing on climbs that were previously retro-bolted. But climbers should always be wary of attempting trad climbs that are close to the limit of their ability.

1.13.3. Horton Falls 1 route in Crag

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -30.330852, 150.337752

description

Small crag on the top of a rarely flowing waterfall. Will clean up with more ascents.

access issues

A small trad crag from 10m to 20m overlooking Horton falls. If you park at the top car park near the bbq pit, walk down the trail for 25m and you will see the main cliff over on the other side of the river. Follow the trail down for another 100m to the first waterfall, cross the river on the rocky section and skirt around the cliff line on an obvious goats trail to gain access to the top of the cliff. Rap down or scramble down further down.

approach

In a national park so please don't leave any rubbish, respect the flora and fauna.

where to stay

Barraba has a hotel 30 min away. Or camp in Kaputar.

ethic

Trad, many routes here need a lot of cleaning and loose rock is a very real threat. Plenty of natural gear placements around, however bolting could be needed on some of the more unprotected sections.

1.13.4. Mt Plagyan and Pinnacles 3 routes in Crag

Summary:
Rock climbing and Aid climbing

Lat / Long: -30.473797, 150.282674

1.13.5. Gins Leap 28 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -30.658011, 150.039824

description

Located down on the flats, Gin's leap is a surprisingly large Trachyte dome, rising out of the plains 4km north of Boggabri on the Narrabri Rd. Unfortunately the rock is very friable, although there are sections with some good climbing.

Useful Info: The "Rock Guide" for 'Kaputar', is still the up to date guide for this area. If there is a blanket of cloud and drizzle over the 'Kaputar' highlands, this may be a place to check out.

© (koala)

1.13.6. Moonbi slabs 124 routes in Crag

Summary:
Bouldering, Trad climbing and Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -30.972517, 151.055016

description

The Moonbi area (Anteater Buttress and environs) presents many granitic cliff lines, mainly slabby in nature and much of which has now been explored. In the early years most of the interest concentrated on Anteater Buttress and the boulders above due to easy access and obvious quality. The slab routes are some of the best in New England and there have been no hang-ups with anti-bolting ethics here so most of the routes are well protected.

access issues

The town of Moonbi is located about 20km North of Tamworth on the New England Highway, in the heart of chicken country. The access arrangements have changed in recent years and general access is now not allowed. If you want to climb here you must go with Kevin Moore from Tamworth or with the UNEMC from Armidale. In addition you will be required to fill out a special indemnity form, requested by the landowner's insurers available only from Moore and Stephens. Failure to adhere to this procedure will see a total lockout.

history

The first routes were done in April 1975 by various Armidale climbers. The notable routes from these early visits were the classic 'Snakeskin Flake' 13 by Bob Killip and Phil Prior, the desperate jam crack 'Savage' 19 (now 23 due to a falling block) by Bob Killip and Max Smart, and the bold 'Slabba-Dabba-Do' 17,which was the first slab route to be done,by Robert Stazewski and Bob Killip. The last route was particularly impressive since it was done on sight (ie no brushing or bolting !) and it took many years before it had its second lead. Another route of interest was the popular 'Sorrow' 14 by Phil Prior. A total of eight new routes were put up that year.

Only two new climbs were completed in 1976, 'Laurel And Hardy' 15, above the slabs, by Brian Birchall and, on the Splitters Gully Road Slabs the multi-pitch 'Babylon' 12 by Laimonis Kavelieris, the only climb there to date.

The area continued to see visitors from time to time mainly to repeat 'Snakeskin Flake'. Early 1982 saw the first climbs at Goal Creek Slabs. Ed Sharpe led 'Trundle' 11 and Al Stephens did 'Protection Racket' 14 and 'Up For Grabs' 18. During the same year Kevin Moore completed the first route up high on the ridge at The Brothers, 'Can't Remember Her Name' 12.

However it wasn't until Mark Colyvan and Brian Birchall returned to the area to do the second ascent of 'Slabba-Dabba-Do' in early 1983 that the potential of the slabs was realised. Colyvan bolted and brushed an obvious black slab which he climbed a few months later with Paul Bayne and Paul Colyvan (Animal) to give 'New Romantic' 21 which was an instant classic. This route was Paul's introduction to slab climbing, a style which he grew to love and master very quickly. During the same year Ed Sharpe returned to Goal Creek Slabs to do the powerful 'Scare Tactics' 19. Later in the year, back at the Anteater slabs Al Stephens got into the act by doing 'On the Slack' 18, another route sporting bolts,and Paul Colyvan did 'Slap And Tickle' 17. Paul also did 'Green Spastic Chook' 11, on the boulders above the slabs.

When Paul Colyvan moved to Tamworth the next year, 1884, he did the bold slab left of 'New Romantic' called 'Fashion Conscious' 22 which was the first slab done in the new high friction boots; Fires.

Things were fairly quiet here until August,1986 when the Colyvan brothers returned for a long weekend and camped in a Kootingal motel so that they could eat Chocolate Bavarians and watch the footy at night. They spent most of the three days at the crag brushing and bolting. However they ended up with three great slab routes; 'Slow Fade' 22 by Mark,'Cock and Pullet' 17 by Paul, and 'Head Over Heels' 19 also by Paul!. Later in the year Al Stephens put in two half days bolting to produce yet another good slab in 'Buck Buck Bacaw' 21.

1987 produced only two new routes, 'Bantam' 17 by Larry Dixon, and 'Finger Lickin Chicken' by Stephens, both on the boulders above the slabs.

1988 was another quiet year with two shady climbs on the boulders above the slabs, 'Shady Bridge' by Gary Phillips and 'Shady Tactics' by Kevin Moore. Later that year Kevin Moore with Bob Murison began exploration of the Kootingal Tip. They found 'Scanties on the Chockstone' 14, by Bob, and Petticoat Corner' 14 by Kevin.

The next two years were boom years for Moonbi. During 1989 21 new climbs were recorded. Seven were completed at the Lookout Crag (now totally closed), the best being the classics 'Confidence Limits' 16 and 'Interative Process' 17 both by Kevin Moore. Eight new routes were conceived on the boulders below the slabs. The best being Larry Dixon's 'Faith No More' 21 and the classic 'Beak Job' 19, and Mark Colyvan's 'The Fosbury Flop' 21. A quick weekend visit by the infamous crag developer Andrew Penny with Carl-Joan Jagusch resulted in two new routes, the best being the very popular 'Henny Penny' 18 by Penny. Later that year Mark Colyvan with Jo Monaghan slogged their way up to the slabs on the Left side of Moonbi Gap and completed the very long, but easy access route 'Walking Back To Happiness' 4, as well as 'Promise' 16, a two pitch slab.

New route fever continued into 1990. Twenty-two new routes! John Wilde put up the last route on the slabs to date,the very bold 'Head Over Heels-Direct Finish' 24. Attention then moved to the Lookout crag. Eight new routes were completed, mostly by Newcastle climbers. The best being 'Sebastian's' Maximum Likelihood' 25 by Paul Reviere, 'Zoro Direct' 21 by George Fieg, 'Call Me Al' 24 by John Wilde and 'The Great Leap Forward' 19 by Al Stephens. During one of his visits, Newcastle climber John Wilde accidentally stole Paul Colyvan's bolt prepared route at The Fosbury Flop Boulder, 'Death Warrant' 23. Around the same time Kevin Moore completed 'Pluckin' Feathers' 21 on the boulders above the slabs. The other area of huge development was the boulders below the slabs. Seven new climbs were put up, the best being 'The Caponiser' 17 by Kevin Moore, 'Cock-A-Hoop' 22 and 'Kentucky Fried Rodent' 21 by Gavin Dean, all at Pecker Wall. Later that year interest turned to the two new areas up on the ridge. Kevin Moore led a tramline of climbers up the classic 'Boys Day Out' 15 at The Brothers, then moved on to The Minefield to do 'Hybrid Vigour' 20. With him was John Wilde who, at the same crag, completed the very technical 'Dambuster' 24.

In 1991 everyone calmed down. Kevin's son Anthony Moore led 'Play School' 7, his first lead. Al Stephens made the long trek to Moonbi Gap-Left Side to complete 'Perfect Skin' 15. Then during December when it was too hot to do any long lines, Kevin Moore ticked of three more at Kootingal Tip, 'No Refuse'15, Wasted Time' 9 and 'Laughing Litter' 10.

In 1992 Al Stephens finally cracked his long term project at Pecker Wall, 'Chicken Vindaloo' 25. Kevin Moore, Dave Worthington and Jim Morgan found another five climbs at Kootingal Tip, the best being Kevin's 'Scalpel' 19 and Jim's 'Dynamic Lifter' 21.

The Kootingal Tip produced one more climb in April 1993,'XPT' 20 by Kevin Moore. In October the same year Stuart Whitten launched a small expedition to Moonbi Gap-Right Side (the North side) and completed 'Up The Garden Path' 5, 'Sly Street' 12 and 'Shoulder Boulder' 16.

If you want to do new climbs, there's always lines between the lines. But if you don't, there are masses of great climbs to repeat. Anyone want to go to Moonbi next weekend ? Al Stephens........September 199

1.13.7. The Wastelands 27 routes in Crag

Summary:
Bouldering, Rock climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -31.069863, 151.036084

summary

Granite

description

Kootingal TSR is the land ajoining the old kooty tip (now kooty transfer centre).

access issues

Some of the gates are locked and others not. The recent one that i have seen unlocked, is the one opposite the old planetarium (pyramid building on the opposite side of the road) you can't miss it.I have also been told recently that the one on the corner of sandy road and the new england highway is open. Be careful of the tiger pear if you are taking dogs. Now i have included climbs in the tip compound for historic value and because well there is some dam good climbs there. That been said Council probably wouldn't give out right permission. Might be an idea to say away from the compound during opening hours http://www.tamworth.nsw.gov.au/Waste/Rural-Waste-Management-Facilities/Rural-Waste-Operating-Hours/default.aspx. The fences are hardly high security too, basically crappy stock fences.

approach

15km north of Tamworth on the New England highway.

ethic

As for all TSR's keep the gates closed, even though i have never seen stock in there. Take your rubbish with you, even though there is plenty already there.

history

As far back as 1988 through to the mid/late ninties Kevin Moore, Bob Murison, Dave Worthington,. John Wilde, and even the then barley teenage Anthony Moore (Kevins son). Set routes on the large bouldery granite. Back then to add to the fun the tip was constantly smouldering and the air was always smelly. These days we fortunately don't have to deal with that. Big thanks to Kevin for sharing his guide ( A Rockclimbers Guide To Moonbi & Environs

1999 Edition by Kevin Moore and Al Stephens)

and for allowing me to share it!

1.13.8. Tintinhull 34 routes in Area

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -31.069143, 150.995835

description

A small Granite boulder area 10 kilometers east of Tamworth. The granite here varies in quality, with ongoing development from locals. Beware the Tiger Pear that grows prolifically in this area, it is a pain to remove.

access issues

Both the TSR (Tintin's) and Porky's are public land but please don't cross fence lines into private property, as temping as some of those boulders look.

approach

From Tamworth head north on the New england/oxley highway for approximately 10 kilometres till you reach Tintinhull road. Turn left and continue on tintinhull road for another 4 kilometres till you reach the intersection of porcupine land and Tintinhull road. For Tintin's continue on 30 metres and the gate to the TSR (Tintin's) is on your right. For Porky's turn right into porcupine lane and head up about 1 kilometre to the top of the cutting. You will see where the old road used to go over the hill on the right, this is Porky's.

ethic

Please keep the gate closed to the TSR (tintin's) cattle on the road is no fun. While we welcome the additions of new routes and projects only ask that contact is made to our group so we may keep things updated (https://www.facebook.com/groups/1442121059411786/) Please ensure you take all your rubbish with you. We as a group are making a conscious effort to clean up this area to ensure future use for everyone.

history

No doubt explored by legendary local climbing family the Moore's back in the day. With permission, Peter Monks did some scattered bouldering on the property south of Porky's in 1996. Also a favorite haunt of one time locals sean mctavish and phil witchard back in 03-04. Now project bouldering area for the Tamworth based, Inglis County Boulder Patrol.

1.13.9. Marsupial Park Gully 0 routes in Area

1.13.10. Tamworth Lookout 0 routes in Area

1.13.11. Freestyle Bouldering Gym 197 routes in Gym

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -31.104572, 150.921640

description

Ten4 Bouldering League and social climbing in a supportive and fun environment. Boulder problems suit all levels and change regularly with each Ten4 season.

Further information can be found on Freestyle's website https://freestyleboulderinggym.wildapricot.org/

approach

7-11 Anne Street Tamworth.

history

The Freestyle Bouldering community was first developed in Tamworth on March 2017 and has steadily grown since.

1.13.12. North West Climbing Mobile Climbing wall 7 routes in Gym

Summary:
All Top roping

Lat / Long: -31.112301, 150.897957

summary

8m mobile climbing wall based in Tamworth

description

8m high mobile climbing wall. 4 top ropes

1.13.13. Pumps Aerobic and Fitness Centre 0 routes in Gym

description

Reserve Place, Tamworth, New South Wales

1.14. Central Western Slope and Plains 274 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -32.350568, 147.888469

1.14.1. Warrumbungles 252 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -31.282894, 149.005306

summary

Perhaps the greatest concentration of high quality, long routes to be found anywhere in Australia. Adventurous routes in a remote, beautiful setting.

description

The four main climbing areas in the Warrumbungles (Crater Bluff, Belougery Spire, Tonduron and Bluff Mountain)offer some of the best long routes in the country, as well as perhaps the greatest concentration of long routes to be found anywhere in Australia. All this in a spectacular setting of towering, rocky spires, thin blades of rock 100 metres high and 200 metre plus cliffs seemingly everywhere you look. The routes, however, are generally fairly serious, irrespective of the grade. This however, just adds to the sense of adventure one inevitably experiences when climbing in the Warrumbungles. As well as the sheer beauty of the climbs and their setting the routes in the Warrumbungles, being one of the oldest climbing areas in Australia, are rich in history. I can't picture climbing to the top or Belougery Spire without imagining how Eric Dark and Osmar White must have felt when they reached the summit for the first time in 1932, nor can l climb Lieben without sparing a thought for Ted Batty and his famous pair or sand-shoes! In the Warrumbungles, more than in any place I know, there is something more to the climbs than just a series of moves. All in all, the Warrumbungles are wonderful. They are home to some magnificent climbs, and I hope you, too, have the opportunity to experience their special charm.

Mark Colyvan 'The Warrumbungles' Insert for Rock No 20, 1994

For most of the routes in the Bungles a double rack of cams, a single set of nuts and a few smaller hexes along with as many slings as you can get your hands on make for a great rack. Alternatively, you could opt for a more traditional and lighter rack and with a single set of cams, two sets of nuts and a full, glorious set of hexes most of the climbs could be managed quite safely. Also make sure you have access to double ropes for many of the climbs as this will make rope management easier and safer.

Due to the difficulty (and inconsistencies) in describing routes in the Warrumbungles it is suggested that you take any other available route descriptions available. The most comprehensive version is found at: http://www.sydneyclimbing.com/confluence/display/nswrock/Warrumbungles

approach

The Warrumbungle National Park is located in the NW of New South Wales just west of Coonabarabran on the Newell Hwy. It is reached by driving to Coonabarabran and following the well-signposted road past Siding Spring Observatory to the park (about 33 km).

http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/Warrumbungle-National-Park

where to stay

Camp Blackman is the main campsite to base adventures, it has powered and unpowered sites, toilets and hot showers.

Most climbers choose to stay in or camp near Balor Hut, a one·and·a·half hour walk up the hill from Camp Pincham, which is where the car is left (the trail head to the Grand High Tops walk). The Balor Hut campsite offers tankwater (although as the tank sometimes runs dry it is wise to check with the rangers first) and access to Belougery Spire, Crater Bluff and Bluff Mountain. Access to other areas is described under the relevant sections.

There is also primitive but beautiful camping (no facilities) at Dows Camp (at Nuada Saddle) which is close to Bluff Mountain, this is best accessed via the West Spirey Creek Track rather than hiking the Pincham Creek Trail and past Balor Hut.

Bookings can be be made online via the NSW National Parks website.

There is Testra and Optus mobile coverage throughout much of the climbing area including from the ridge near Balor Hut. This includes the main face of Bluff Mountain.

history

This history as well as most of the route descriptions were adapted (with permission) from Mark Colyvan's guide 'The Warrumbungles' which was an insert to Rock Magazine Issue 20, 1994.

The climbing history of the Warrumbungles begins with the first rockclimbing club in Australia, the Blue Mountaineers, a very informal group of climbers led by the legendary Eric Dark. Besides Dark, the club's core consisted of Eric Lowe. Osmar White, Dot English (later Dot Butler), Dark's wife Eleanor and the mysterious Louis Brant who wrote an article for Walkabout in 1936 about the group's activities in the Warrumbungles, including himself in many of their ascents despite receiving no mention in accounts given by any of the others. (I suspect that Louis Brant may have been a pen-name for Eric Lowe, who was well on his way to becoming a famous writer).

Eric Dark was inspired to visit the Warrumbungles after seeing pictures on the walls of the local railway station in Mittagong around the turn of the century. It was not until 1932, however, that he finally managed to get there, accompanied by his wife, Lowe, White and perhaps Brant. They were first taken to Tonduron by the local farmer, JL Mcintyre, on whose property the magnificent spire lay. Mcintyre apparently wanted to see whether the group could really climb, so he ignored the usual ascent route and took them to the more difficult south side. The five of them, Mcintyre included, then proceeded to climb to the summit, most probably by what we now know as South Arête (5).

They then moved camp to a spot near the head of Tunderbrine Creek in order to have a go at Crater Bluff (then known as Split Rock) and Belougery Spire, the latter having been proclaimed as 'impossible' by the locals in the pub. Dark and White attempted Crater Bluff by what may have been Diagonal Route but failed some 30 m short of the top. The same pair then turned their attention to Belougery Spire and, after a couple or false starts, managed to make the summit of this spectacular spire by what was almost certainly the Tourist Traverse (6), much to the amazement of the locals!

It is interesting to note that the route Dark and White eventually took to the summit of Belougery Spire had been seen by Dark through field-glasses from Wombelong and that he had commented at the time that the key to reaching the summit lay in attaining the obvious traverse on the West Face. This indicated that the group's success in the Warrumbungles was no fluke-Dark, at least, was very methodical and had a keen eye for a feasible route.

The next trip to the area was undertaken by Dark and Lowe (or 'Louis Brant', depending on which account you believe) in 1935, with the intention of doing some 'gentle prospecting of possible routes up Split Rock'. They looked at a number of possibilities, in the process making a rather ambitious attempt on Rib and Gully.

The following year a larger group returned, with Crater Bluff their main objective. After a little more exploration, Dark and English climbed to the summit by the Tourist Route (9). The next day the young, barefooted English took the rest of the group to the summit, including Suzanne Reichard who later wrote an account of the ascent in the Sun newspaper.

This was the last recorded visit to the Warrumbungles by the Blue Mountaineers and the group drifted apart soon afterwards. While their contributions in the way of new routes in the Warrumbungles are of no great technical interest by today's standards, they stand as monuments to the audacity and adventurous spirit of these pioneer rockclimbers and their primitive equipment, which consisted of a rope and a hand-made cast-iron piton.

The next recorded activity in the Warrumbungles was not until the mid-1950s when a member of the then recently formed Sydney Rockclimbing Club (SAC), Russ Kippax, teamed up with a visiting English climber, Bill Peascod. This pair made the first ascent of the Bread-knife by South Arete (11) in 1954 and in the same year established Vintage Rib on Crater Bluff. At grade Hard V Diff (15), this latter was the hardest route in the area for six years and remained unrepeated for a decade. The exact route they took is not certain, but it was definitely the best route in the area until the early 1960s. The same year saw the first ascent of Rib and Gully (13) on Crater Bluff by C. lvin and party.

By the late 1950s the Warrumbungles had become a popular destination among SAC regulars, with the resulting establishment of a number of good new routes such as, in 1956, North Arete (13) on the Bread-knife by Kippax, Dave Roots, Jeff Field and Peter Hardy and, two years later, Diagonal Route (15) on Crater Bluff by Hardy and Field. Also of note from this period was Ted Batty's and Ron Malor's North Face Route on Crater Bluff which, at grade 17, was a very hard route for 1960. In fact, it was quite possibly the first grade 17 in Australia! The following year saw the first ascent of Vertigo (10) on Belougery Spire by Roger McDonald and Alex Hromas.

Nineteen sixty-one also saw the return to Australia of Bryden Allen, bringing with him the first pair of PAs (which, for the benefit of the youngsters, were an early type of climbing-boot). Allen wasted little time in making an impact on the Warrumbungles with ascents of Lieben (17), Out and Beyond (15) and the direct version of Kevin and Trevor Westren's route Cornerstone Rib, all climbed with Ted Batty in 1962. Apart from his obvious ability as a climber, Allen's major contribution to the Australian climbing scene was his choice of routes. He was attracted to big, blank-looking walls that were years ahead of their time. Lieben is a perfect example of Allen's vision; even today, with the advantages of modem equipment, many climbers have some fairly anxious moments on this route.

Try to imagine doing it in 1962 with the equipment Allen and Batty had available to them Batty didn't even have boots; he climbed it in sand-shoes! In 1963 Allen published 'The Rockclimbs of NSW' which contained 18 routes in the Warrumbungles. This number was soon exceeded, however, as Allen continued the new-routing spree during that year. Perhaps the most significant route of 1963 was Heart-stopper (18) on the West Face of the Bread-knife, climbed by Allen and a young, inexperienced Chris Regan who was apparently in full accord with the choice of name! In hindsight, this route was quite possibly the first grade 18 in Australia (the first grade 17 (North Face Route) was also in the Bungles)! Allen continued working on the Bread-knife in 1964 with the first ascent of the East Face route (17,M2).

Nineteen sixty-four was significant for other reasons, however. By that time all major peaks in the area had numerous routes on them; the one notable exception was the impressive North Face or Bluff Mountain. This face was home to only one route, North West Gully (10), which had been established by lvin, Montgomery and Griffiths in 1960, and even this was well to one side of the main face. Allen set about rectifying this situation, choosing a bold route up the middle of the highest part of this 300 m cliff. The resulting climb, Elijah (17), was undoubtedly the most serious hard climb in Australia at that time and a portent of things to come on Bluff Mountain. In an interview in 1972 Allen had this to say about the route:

‘Elijah took us eight days actual climbing before we did it, most of that retreating and going back again. I started off with two attempts with Ted Batty, two with John Davis and finally finished it off with John Ewbank, and event then I had to offer to pay for all his food for a week to get him up there (Thrutch No 58, December 1972).

The other reason why 1964 was a significant year in the Warrumbungles was that it saw the name of John Ewbank appear on new-route descriptions there for the first time. He opened his account with a 315 m girdle traverse of the West Face of the Bread-knife and the Butter-knife with John Davis, called Broadsword (16). Ewbank, of course, would go on to dominate the hard new route scene in the second half of the 1960s, not just in the Warrumbungles but throughout New South Wales.

The most significant additions of 1965 were by Allen (again!) and John Davis-who did the first hard route on Tonduron with Northern Groove (18) and by John Lawrence and David Witham who did Caucasus Corner (17) on Belougery Spire. As already mentioned, the latter half of the 1960s belonged to John Ewbank. On Boxing Day 1966, climbing with John Worrall, he managed to establish a sustained and exposed route right of Lieben which Allen had previously attempted in 1964. The result was The Crucifixion (16). Throughout 1966 and 1967, however, Ewbank mostly concentrated on short, hard routes on the Butter-knife and the Fish-knife such as The Rapier (19) and Cutlass (16).

The next routes of any significance to be done were in 1969 when the powerful team of Ewbank and Allen forced two major new lines up Bluff Mountain. First in April, came Ginsberg (17,M1) and then Stonewall Jackson (17,M4) in October.

Nineteen sixty-nine also saw a number of repeats of some of the harder 'Bungles routes by a new crowd of young climbers. Amongst them were a couple of names that would pop up time and time again on new routes in the 'Bungles, particularly on Bluff Mountain: Keith Bell and Keith Lockwood. In the 1970s attention turned to Bluff Mountain and eventually to Tonduron. In December 1972 Bell and Greg Mortimer established two new routes on Bluff Mountain on the one trip. Although, as Lockwood commented, 'such domination of the cliff was new and startling' (Rock no 3, 1980), it was a taste of things to come, especially in the case of Bell. The first of these two ground-breaking routes was Icarus (19) which opened up the right-hand end of the cliff, while the second, done after a rest-day, took a more obvious line up the extreme left end of the main face. The latter route, Bastion Buttress (13), provides a lovely introduction to the cliff. The following year Lockwood visited Tonduron with Ray Lassman and managed to do A Little Rainbow (19) after the almost obligatory epic.

Nineteen seventy-three saw the publication of the first edition of 'Rockclimbing in the Warrumbungles' by Andrew Pavey and Warwick Williams, which described over 50 climbs in the area, the hardest being grade 19.

The following year Bell returned to claim another two routes on Bluff Mountain, this time with Lassman. The first was the wall between Ginsberg and Icarus, which yielded one of Bluff Mountain's hardest routes to date: Ulysses (20). The other route, which had looked as though it might have been harder, was to become one of the most popular classics in the 'Bungles. It was, of course, Flight of the Phoenix (16). Kim Carrigan was also busy on Bluff Mountain in 1974. First, he freed Stonewall Jackson at grade 20 with Jan Lewis; then the same pair attempted a new route between Elijah and Ginsberg below looming roofs. It turned into a nightmare epic on bad rock, minimal protection and poor belays. They retreated, and Lewis vowed never to go near Bluff Mountain again. Carrigan returned later that year with Nat Nicholas to complete the route. The result was Aladinsane (19).

In 1974, Bell also made a couple of trips to Tonduron. The first, with Mortimer, resulted in Virago (20) and Saratoga (17); the second, with Ian 'Humzoo' Thomas, produced Antares (19). The following year, Allen made a brief return to the Warrumbungles, climbing North-west Groove (15), also on Tonduron, with Williams. Meanwhile, back on Bluff Mountain, 1975 produced no new routes but instead was a period of consolidation in which many major routes received their second ascents. Lockwood and Peter Morris, for example, claimed the second ascent, and first free ascent, of Ginsberg (now 19).

In 1976 a few more routes were added to Bluff Mountain. Bell and Mortimer climbed Daedalus (19,M1) on the right end of the cliff and attempted a girdle of the whole North Face. The latter, rather ambitious project produced Rim-fire (17), a 480 m route starting up Bastion Buttress and finishing up Ginsberg alter traversing above the middle roofs. Bell described the exposure as 'shattering'. It was also in this year that Lockwood and John Bowen made a weekend dash from Melbourne to do the classic London's Dockyard (19) which takes a line between Stonewall Jackson and Flight of the Phoenix. As though doing a major new route on a weekend trip from Melbourne wasn't epic enough, on the way back they blew up the engine in Lockwood's Volkswagen and had to limp home in second gear!

In September 1976 Joe Friend published the second edition or Rockclimbing in the Warrumbungles, which described over 80 routes, the hardest being graded 20. Since the release of that guide there has been a great deal of activity in the Warrumbungles with, as you would expect, most of it occurring on Bluff Mountain (and much of it by Keith Bell!). Unfortunately, however, very little information has been available since the 1976 guide, resulting in many new routes being climbed without prior knowledge of the existing climbs. Consequently, there are likely to be a number of routes in his guide which are not really new routes. No doubt it will be some time before matters are sorted out. There have been few major developments since 1976. Most of the routes established have been of a similar quality and nature to those already existing. These years saw further epic weekend jaunts from Melbourne by Lockwood with a variety of partners. One Friday night in September 1977 Lockwood and Ed Neve made the 13·hour drive to the Warrumbungles, then, without sleeping, walked up to Balor Hut and dumped their camping gear. Continuing on to Bluff Mountain, the pair climbed Flight of the Phoenix as a warm-up, taking about three hours (Lockwood had done it before). They then returned to Balor Hut to sleep. They were up at dawn the next day and again headed for Bluff Mountain, this time to do a classic new route, Neruda (18), near Ginsberg. This took them most or the day. Upon completing it they picked up their gear from the hut, walked back to the car and drove through the night to arrive back in Melbourne on Monday morning!

The next most significant bout of new routes was in May 1982 during a visit from three of Australia's top climbers of the period, Mark Moorhead, Kim Carrigan and Mike Law. By the end of their visit there were three major new climbs on Bluff Mountain, all harder than grade 20, the hardest being Cracked Pane (24) which was four grades harder than anything else in the Warrumbungles at the time and still remains the area's most difficult routes. The other routes completed by this trio were Lusty's (21) and For Starters (23).

Three other climbers deserve special mention for their contributions to new routes in the Warrumbungles during this time. Keith Bell, Greg Croft and Joe Friend. Keiths love of Bluff Mountain was illustrated by his name being on 21 of the 39 routes documented on that cliff. Given the size of the mountain and the seriousness of the routes, this is truly an impressive record. Greg (and often Dan Croft) was on the first ascent of nearly 60 routes in the early 1990's. Mostly on Timor Rock, Belougery Spire, The Needle, Canyon Cliffs and Balckman's Bluff. Joe went on a solo bender in 1976 and soloed 16 first ascents, totaling nearly 1,200m and up to grade 18. Bold!

Not many routes were recorded between 1994 and 2010, when Neil Monteith and Mike Law focused on new routes on Crater Bluff. They established several pitches linking to existing routes and the formidable Verdun (24) which bought an unprecedented level of bolting to the area.

A new route was finally added to Bluff Mountain in 2012 (after about 20 years) with Corinth (21) being added near Bastion Buttress by Peter Grezl and Peter Kuczera.

There are obviously many names and stories not mentioned in this rather selective history of rockclimbing in the Warrumbungles. Please feel free to add more, especially in regard to crags other than the major spires.

1.14.2. Cowra 22 routes in Area

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -33.830177, 148.691310

description

Cowra is a town with a population of 9700 people in the Central West region of New South Wales. There is granite bouldering right in the middle of town.

approach

Cowra is easily accessible by car via either Lachlan Valley Way, the Mid Western Highway or Grenfell Road.

1.15. South West Slopes 6 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing and Bouldering

Lat / Long: -35.003252, 148.377874

1.15.1. Blowering Cliffs 4 routes in Crag

Summary:
Trad climbing and Bouldering

Lat / Long: -35.430406, 148.305255

summary

Tall, multi pitch fine grained granite cliffs, semi alpine altitude

description

These west facing tall fine grained granite cliff tower above the Eastern side of Blowering Reservoir 15 mins drive south of Tumut on the edge of the Snowy Mountains National Park.

access issues

Start from Log Bridge Creek Picnic area in the Kosciuszko National Park approx 19kms south of Tumut on the Snowy Mountains Highway.

approach

Follow the Blowering Cliff Walking track for approximately 2kms from the Log Bridge Creek picnic area, the track goes directly to the base of the slabs in the vicinity of the waterfall.

where to stay

Good camping abounds along the shores of Blowering Reservoir or if you want more facilities and are prepared to stay check out Tumut a short drive down the hill.

ethic

Trad and mixed climbing routes.

history

Not much is known of the routes in this area and there is little evidence of much being done on the vast granite walls and slabs. Please send me a mesage if you know anything or route details that we can add in.

1.15.2. Yarrangobilly Gorge 0 routes in Crag

summary

Limestone Gorge in semi Alpine country

description

Limestone gorge and caves in semi alpine country. Beautiful country in summer and alot cooler than the plains. The caves have the usual tourist tours and National Parks staff so be polite.

access issues

Part of Kosciuszko National Park so be nice and polite, parks are accepting of climbers but just like to be notified of your presence and dont climb on the caves above tourists.

approach

Follow the Snowy mountains Highway North from Cooma or South from Tumut to the turn off to Yarrangobilly Caves. marked with big tourist signs. Park in the lower car park just down from the caves house and follow the signs down into the gorge.

where to stay

You can stay at the Caves House or at the nearby campsite at Yarrangobilly (place - not a town) up on the Snowy Mountains Highway

ethic

Trad and Mixed

history

Unknown but there are a few signs of stuff being climbed in the area, pitons and old bolts etc. If you know, please let me know or add here.

1.15.3. Blue Water Holes 0 routes in Crag

summary

Limestone in a pretty Alpine gorge

description

Unique Limestone gorge up to 80m high in spots with a beautiful river in the northern end of the Kosciuszko National Park. Rock varies from nice to complete choss.

access issues

Access is closed during from June long weekend to the first weekend of October.

approach

Follow the signs to Blue Water Holes along Long Plain Road of the Snowy Mountains highway. This can be accessed by 4wd from the Brindabella end but is veryu rough and slow going.

where to stay

Camp at the Picnic/Campground at Blue Water Holes, thunderbox dunny, picnic tables etc

ethic

Trad and Mixed climbing

history

Unknown history but some bolts and routes with initials do exist. If you know anything please let me know - Matt Brooks.

1.15.4. Adelong Falls Reserve 2 routes in Area

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -35.295984, 148.056303

summary

Granite boulders next to a picnic reserve just outside Adelong, with development potential

description

Adelong Falls reserve has a handful of granite boulders scattered across the hilltop either side of the Adelong Falls picnic area. The gorge also has numerous river smoothed boulders with good development potential. Hillside boulders have some friable rock, but it's possible to find solid lines on excellent granite. Not really a destination to go out of your way for, but if you happen to be passing, it's worth a look.

access issues

Climbing is within the Adelong Falls Reserve on public land. Disclaimer is that I put up a couple of problems while passing through, and have had no conversations at all with local stakeholders on the desirability of climbing within the reserve

approach

Turn off the Snowy Valley Highway in Adelong, and head north on Grahamstown Road. The Adelong Falls Reserve is signposted after a couple of KMs, by following Adelong Falls Road. Boulders are obvious on both sides of the car park once you reach the picnic area

1.16. Riverina 130 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -34.746873, 145.663287

summary

Central southern corner of country NSW which holds potential for development for those eager to explore!

description

Get exploring and send! Scattered crags across wide open landscapes begging for first ascents and repeats of existing routes is a developers dream!

1.16.1. Scenic Hill - Hermits Cave Griffith 40 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Bouldering

Lat / Long: -34.270528, 146.072132

summary

Bouldering on great solid sandstone

description

Suburban bouldering in the middle of Griffith. Loads of problems on the orange boulders below the Hermits Lookout. At the top of the cliffs the rock appears to be quite conglomerate, but the rock quality on the boulders is similar to Gramps sandstone.

approach

From the Griffith CBD follow the signs to Scenic Hill Reserve, turning right at the top of the hill towards the Hermits Cave tourist walk on Scenic Drive. From the car park/lookout go down the stairs on the left and follow the multiple tracks around the base of the boulders to the right.

The area can also be reached from the Lawford Cres, next to the Ted Scobie Oval. There is a rough track that you can drive your car on to get to the boulders if you are to lazy to walk.

ethic

Urban bouldering and some roped climbing. Low impact bolting is a good idea here, carrots and anchors have been placed out of view when possible. Please remember you are sharing the area with walks and mtn bikers, act in an appropriate manner! Minimal chalk and avoid large tick marks. Please take your and others rubbish out with you! Keep noise levels down as sound reflects off cliffs down to houses.

history

Climbing here started in the early 90's when Anthony Alexander and Jacob Ilse did some trad lines, then followed soon after by bouldering which became the main focus. A basic guide does exist.

1.16.2. Rocky Hill Reserve 6 routes in Field

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -35.132696, 147.383665

description

The Cemetry is is small bunch of granite boulders directly above the Wagga Wagga Cemetry in East Wagga Wagga. The rock can be a bit flaky but there are a variety of problems and different shaped boulders. Enough for a few afternoons fun and training. Bring a brush, clean and create some problems.

approach

Drive into the Wagga Wagga Cemetry on Kooringal Rd East Wagga Wagga. Park near the clear area on the top road (runs parallel to Kooringal Rd) just below a gate in the Cemetry rear fence. Go through this gate go R or L up onto the hillside above depending on the boulders you are headed for.

history

One Boulder shows signs of a possible prior visit but history is unknown. Unearthed by Matt Brooks in 2015.

1.16.3. The Rock 78 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -35.283397, 147.074419

description

Know as Kengal to the local Wiradjuri people, The Rock towers 250 metres over the surrounding countryside, and is thought to have been a site for initiation ceremonies. The reserve is an island of natural habitat for native animals, including the turquoise parrot and glossy black cockatoo.

The Rock Nature Reserve is in the southern Riverina of New South Wales, and lies on the boundary of two major physiographic regions: the Riverine Plain and the western slopes of the Eastern Highlands.

On a clear day, you can see Mount Kosciuszko and the Victorian Alps from the top of the three kilometre Yerong nature track.

The Rock is comprised of a hard quartzite like stone laid down in a diagonal like strata. This leads to some beautiful and technical corner, crack and face climbing with lots of diagonally facing holds. Traditional gear is the go to on many of the routes with many good technical placements being found.

access issues

This reserve is 6 km west of The Rock village on Lockhart Road, 35 km east of Lockhart and 40 km south-west of Wagga Wagga off the Olympic Highway.

From 1st July to 31 December The Rock is closed to all 'Rock Sports', due to breeding Peregrine Falcons. A sign is put in place when the birds are nesting in this area. For more information check the NPWS website: https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/adventure-sports-experiences/the-towers

Climbing is only permitted at The Towers and is prohibited in other areas of the reserve at this time.

approach

Approach time to The Towers is 20 Minutes, Central Buttress is 25 Minutes, and The Main Face is 35 Minutes

where to stay

There is no camping within The Rock Nature Reserve, visitors can stay the night at The Rock Village, or find other accommodation options in neighbouring towns including Wagga Wagga

ethic

Taken from the NPWS signage located at The Towers:

Rockclimbing and abseiling within The Rock Nature Reserve may only be carried out with the consent of the director-General of the National Parks and Wildlife Service. Consent is given upon compliance with the Code of Conduct and completion of the Register book located at the base of The Towers.

Code of Coduct *Rock activities are only permitted on the NE rock face known as The Towers

*Parties are to be no larger than 4 people for rock climbing and 8 for abseiling.

*No new climbs are to be established outside of the designated rock activities area.

*Do not mark the location of climbs.

*Do not attach permanent anchor points to rocks, USE REMOVABLE GEAR only.

*Do not chip or glue route, brush or "garden" the rock face and avoid excessive use of chalk.

*Where possible descend via the cliff face to minimise erosion.

*Tread Lightly, keep to rocks, hard ground and established tracks.

*All flora and fauna are protected in The Rock Nature Reserve and must not be picked, harmed or disturbed in any way. Take especial care not to harm the Threatened plant Woolly Ragwort (Senecio gariandii).

1.16.4. Holbrook 6 routes in Crag

Summary:
Mostly Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -35.724850, 147.391235

description

Holbrook is a small town with a population of approximately 1250 people in Southern New South Wales.

access issues

Access to Crown Land is through private property. Please stop and ask permission to reach the Nature Reserve. Take care to leave any gates as you find them.

approach

From Holbrook take Racecourse Road. Follow until it turns right and continue on dirt road until a property is reached. Please stop here to seek permission to cross and access the Nature Reserve. Drive as close to the cliff as you are able and walk uphill

where to stay

There is a small variety of accommodation available in Holbrook including hotels and motels.

1.17. Lower Western 0 routes in Region

description

A vast empty and flat desert, but may hold a few gems for those willing to look around. Discerning clifflines or boulders from the satellite imagery is difficult as the colour of the ground blends with any rock so most places will need to be scouted in person.

1.17.1. The Pinnacle 0 routes in Area

description

Rocky outcrop in the middle of nowhere. Could have some potential from google maps photos.

Somewhat famous for being a location used in Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (see google maps review)

1.18. Upper Western 0 routes in Region

1.18.1. Mount Gundabooka 0 routes in Area

summary

Climbing is not permitted in this national park.

description

Climbing is not permitted in this national park.

access issues

Within a national park which holds significant amounts of Aboriginal Artwork that should be avoided at all costs in regards to climbing

1.18.2. Tibooburra 0 routes in Area

description

String of hilly outcrops that may offer some small cliffs in this flat desert area. Found using google satellite.

1.19. Western NSW 0 routes in Region

1.19.1. Wagga 0 routes in Area

1.20. Lord Howe Island Group 1 route in Region

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -31.638903, 159.144300

1.20.1. Lord Howe Island 0 routes in Area

1.20.2. Ball's Pyramid 1 route in Crag

Summary:

Lat / Long: -31.754919, 159.249765

summary

Remote sea stack climbing

description

A 552 m high volcanic sea stack

access issues

A world heritage area, climbing is only permitted since 1986 for scientific purposes. Strict bio security measures are essential to preserve the unique flora and fauna on this seamount which includes dryococelus australis and other invertebrates once common on LHI, but now endangered, largely due to rat predation on Lord Howe. Other threats to this ecosystem include morning glory infestation at lower levels.

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