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Use this Region Guide to easily find and compare Crags.

Table of contents

1. World 814,870 routes in Region

Summary:
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Seasonality

Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 0.095187, -0.023521

description

Welcome to www.thecrag.com, a project to collect and distribute climbing information to the climbing community. The site was founded in 1999 by Simon Dale and Campbell Gome, two Australian climbers. In 2010 Brendan Heywood joined the team bringing new skills, ideas and energy. We are currently implementing a major redesign. Use the links on the left and in the table below to explore and add to the index. The more you and your friends use and contribute to the site, the better it becomes for all climbers.

1.1. Australia 79,693 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -10.075600, 137.682251

description

I love a sunburnt country, A land of sweeping plains,

Of ragged mountain ranges, Of droughts and flooding rains.

I love her far horizons, I love her jewel-sea,

Her beauty and her terror – The wide brown land for me!

1.1.1. Victoria 19,279 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -36.648855, 145.526126

1.1.2. New South Wales and ACT 33,272 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -32.806142, 150.150172

access issues

If you have benefited from climbing infrastructure in NSW, please consider making a donation towards maintenance costs. The Sydney Rockclimbing Club Rebolting Fund finances the replacement of old bolts on existing climbs and the maintenance of other hardware such as fixed ropes and anchors. The SRC purchases hardware, such as bolts and glue, and distributes them to volunteer rebolters across the state of New South Wales. For more information, including donation details, visit https://sydneyrockies.org.au/rebolting/

1.1.3. Western Australia 5,165 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -23.832558, 120.633381

1.1.4. Queensland 10,454 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -2.195400, 146.290993

description

Queensland. While not offering the world class crags such as Blue Mountains in NSW or Grampians in Victoria, what it lacks in volume it makes up for in variety. We have more varied rock types and styles within a day trip of Brisbane than any other capital city can boast.

history

1.1.5. South Australia 4,349 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -30.865176, 135.700462

description

South Australia has a rich history of rockclimbing. The main text cited and used for routes in Areas 4 to 9 is:

Badenoch, P.R. and Adams, L.M., 2017, Rockclimbing around Adelaide, Ed. 2.

For current South Australian climbing news: http://climbingclubsouthaustralia.asn.au/

1.1.6. Northern Territory 926 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Rock climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -18.238209, 133.508429

1.1.7. Tasmania 6,230 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -41.575586, 146.180058

1.1.8. Norfolk Island 0 routes in Region

1.1.9. Christmas Island 18 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Deep water soloing and Top roping

Lat / Long: -10.485634, 105.632908

1.2. New Zealand 13,810 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -2.354600, 172.677500

description

There is lots of great climbing and bouldering right across New Zealand.

1.2.1. North Island 4,148 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -37.940400, 175.984500

1.2.2. South Island 9,662 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -1.946427, 170.568000

1.3. Oceania (other) 231 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -3.370047, 160.658434

1.3.1. Melanesia 120 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -10.515777, 161.517737

1.3.2. Micronesia 1 route in Region

Summary:
All Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 6.253902, 158.571616

1.3.3. Polynesia 110 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -15.842199, -152.234938

1.4. North America 144,606 routes in Region

Summary:
Rock climbing, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 44.788465, -108.078056

1.4.1. United States 118,048 routes in Region

Summary:
Rock climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: 41.461515, -118.141506

1.4.2. Canada 21,218 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 56.885300, -94.279200

1.4.3. Mexico 5,340 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 23.753050, -101.223115

summary

Climbing in Mexico is more than just El Potrero Chico, El Salto and El Chonta. Almost all of Mexico is covered by mountains and you will find climbing areas all over the country.

description

Mexico, with the Sierra Madre Occidental and the Sierra Madre Oriental as the main mountain ranges is a very mountaineous country and consequently offers lots of climbing and even more opportunities for future developments all over it. But Mexico not only offers awesome climbing, it also offers an amazing coastline and plenty of history and culture. Climbing in Mexico can thus be much more than just a lot of great climbs - from bouldering, sport climbing to long multi-pitch routes and trad climbs. Browse through the index and get inspired.

1.5. Central America 877 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 16.582878, -76.412955

1.5.1. Belize 24 routes in Region

Flora and Fauna: Africanized Bees

Many cliffs in Belize are inhabited by africanized bees, which are extremly dangerous and have led to near death accidents. Always check the cliff for bees before rapelling or climbing! Cliffs are often unclimbed for longer periods of time and bees come back!

The Virgin Bees (small tubes) are not dangerous.

See warning details and discuss

Created 8 months ago - Edited 7 months ago
Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 17.169774, -88.504856

summary

Mostly known for its beaches, coral reefs and underwater activities, Belize also offers some climbing. Most of it on tufa rich limestone in jungle settings and caves.

description

Belize is certainly not a rock climbing destination. But the wide range of adventure sports and activities offered to the ship loads of tourists also encouraged the development of a small rock climbing community, often as a by-product of zip-lining, tubing and caving.

So if you are in Belize and have your rock climbing gear with you, you can certainly find one or the other developed cliff to have fun on.

1.5.2. Caribbean 668 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 18.736499, -72.590943

1.5.3. Costa Rica 113 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and Top roping

Lat / Long: 9.723702, -84.265088

description

Introduction

Historically, Costa Rica was colonized by Spain until its independence in 1821, and as a result Costa Ricans speak Spanish and have many traditional mores based in Spanish culture. Long since the governance of Spain, Costa Rica has developed into a world leader in terms of environmental stewardship and population happiness. According to the New Economics Foundation, in 2009 Costa Rica was the happiest country on the planet. In terms of environmental stewardship, Costa Rica’s government has made the promise to become carbon neutral by the year 2021. Costa Rica also has 23% protected landmass, the largest in the world - an important attribute as the country hosts the worlds greatest species density and diversity. Today, the small Central American country is best known as a tropical tourist paradise, and a friendly (outside of the big city, expect to say Hola or Buenos to nearly everyone you encounter) Latin country of approximately 4.5 million people. Bordered by Nicaragua to the north, Panama to the south, the Pacific Ocean to the west, and the Caribbean Sea to the east, Costa Rica is renowned for its beautiful beaches, laid back culture, and amazing biodiversity. It may not come as a surprise to know that tourism is Costa Rica’s largest economic driver. In fact, tourism creates more currency exchange than all agricultural crops (the largest three being coffee, pineapples and, bananas) and industry combined. Agriculture has long been replaced as the major provider for the Costa Rican people, and now holds only 8.6% of the GDP, while industry accounts for 31%, and tourism 60.4%. Actually, Costa Rica has the largest tourism industry in all of Central America, a fact that is closely related to the relatively good quality of life, infrastructure, and political stability. The tourism industry itself has developed way beyond the all-inclusive-lay-on-a-beach-for-a-week-holiday. The country has become a hotspot for adventure, hosting some of the worlds best white water paddling and rafting, heart-pounding high bungees, tropical rainforest canopy waterfall rappelling, canyoning and caving, world class mountain biking, and hiking. Costa Rica’s exotic natural environment also allows foreigners and locals alike to get up close and personal with dense rainforest, majestic sea turtles and marine wildlife, a plethora of colourful birds and parrots, active volcanoes, coral reefs, monkeys, crocodiles and so much more. Beyond the tourist attractions, Costa Rica also hosts a wonderful culture, rich history, and a beautiful people. National pride among Costa Ricans, or Ticos (feminine, Ticas), is strong, particularly regarding the economic prosperity, high literacy rates (97%), access to sanitation and clean water (92% and 97% respectively), stable political establishment, and relatively low crime rates, in comparison to other Central American countries. In general, Ticos consider themselves as peaceful (a fact that is enforced by the abolishment of the army in 1949) and fun loving. The saying ‘Pura Vida’ is regular in Tico conversation and literally translates to ‘Pure Life’, but embodies a wider lifestyle that provides a free-spiritedness and stress-free ease of living. The high national pride is well deserved not only for the comparative standard of living, but also due to the quality of life. With national public health care (alongside a private system), a varied diet, a fairly stress-free lifestyle, and tropical climate, Ticos have a longer life expectancy than many ‘more developed’ nations such as the United States. The high quality of life that Ticos enjoy permits them to divulge into their natural environment, arts and culture. On most weekends, many will visit one of the countries stunning beaches, hike the mountains of the central valley around San José, see a movie in a local cinema, or go into the city to visit a museum, see a play, art gallery, or concert. To say the least, there is nothing short to do in Costa Rica, however there is one activity that will always stand above the rest as close to the Tico heart: fútbol. As with the rest of the Latin world, Costa Rica loves soccer. Almost every town is situated with three main landmarks in the center: a church, a major bus stop, and a soccer pitch. If you ever lack something to talk about with a local (unlikely), you can always pick up a local paper and find a solid section dedicated to the sport: catch up on the latest, and let the soccer talk fly. As Costa Rica looks into the future, many developments lay on its horizon. With almost one third of its population under the age of 15, the number of North American and European expats increasing every year, and increasing foreign investment, the demographic and economic landscape of the once mainly coffee producing country is undoubtedly going to go through some heavy metamorphosis. However, it is not only the future of Costa Rican society that appears promising but also the Tico climbing scene. It has been about a decade since individuals took to the vertical world in Costa Rica, and there is much potential for the expansion of routes, areas, and population interest. For more on this read the section Costa Rican Climbing History at the end of the Introductory Chapter.

Climate

Costa Rica has two seasons, rain and sun. For the most part, rainy season occurs between May and November with the rainiest months being October through November. The dry season, between December and April, is the best time to visit the country, with the best months being from late December through February when the temperature is warm, but there is a constant breeze. Later into the dry season temperatures can become very hot as the northern winds die down. This is especially true on the coasts. As for climbing, the best time is late December through February. However, year round climbing can be obtained due to the fact that some crags, like Cachi, are overhanging, and therefore in a light rain remain dry. In the dry season it is best to search out climbing that is shaded, as the tropical sun can make the rock too hot to touch and midday humidity can create a sauna like atmosphere.

1.5.4. El Salvador 1 route in Region

Summary:
All Rock climbing

Lat / Long: 13.648405, -88.848812

1.5.5. Guatemala 66 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 15.592652, -90.425597

1.5.6. Honduras 0 routes in Region

1.5.7. Nicaragua 0 routes in Region

1.5.8. Panama 5 routes in Region

Summary:
All Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 8.345870, -80.141904

summary

Interesting basalt formation formed roughly 500 years ago during the last volcanic eruption.

description

Physical endurance based climbing on the left side if the wall, compared to the more technical right side.

approach

Grab a cab from the city of Boquete to "Los Ladrillos". When you arrive, you will see the crag on your left, it is only 20m off the road.

where to stay

There are plenty of hostels in the town of Boquete, but no camping in the area.

ethic

Chalk usage is welcomed, although hold chipping is frowned upon, as well as bolting.

history

This crag was developed in 2003-2004 and has been enhanced in the years since. It was bolted by a small group of climbers led by one Gary Henning. Since then, the climbing has been maintained by Cesar Melendez, Christian Shreiffer, Dylan Moen Henning, and other local climbers who frequent the crag.

1.6. South America 9,523 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -20.756350, -55.607300

1.6.1. Argentina 2,075 routes in Region

Access: COVID-19: Lockdown

Argentina has ordered a national lockdown from March 19.

See warning details and discuss

Created 7 months ago
Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -36.081268, -65.102163

1.6.2. Bolivia 146 routes in Region

Access: COVID-19: Lockdown

Bolivia has ordered a national lockdown from March 22.

See warning details and discuss

Created 7 months ago
Summary:
Sport climbing, Alpine climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -16.551613, -64.676089

1.6.3. Brazil 3,781 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: -14.409287, -53.893433

description

Brazil is a large country with a lot of climbing potential. Historically most development has focused in the southeast in the states of 'São Paulo', 'Rio de Janeiro' and 'Minas Gerais' however there is now development happening elsewhere.

Styles cover almost everything, from bouldering and single pitch sport routes, to long alpine routes. Climbing gear is very expensive in Brazil (~2-3x what it costs in North America or Europe), making long multi-pitch sport routes more common than elsewhere.

Some guidebooks are easily available for more popular areas (see http://www.companhiadaescalada.com.br/livraria/livraria.htm) but many are only available locally and your best bet is to find a local to show you around. Climbers in Brazil are generally friendly and more likely than average to speak some English. Posting here: http://www.escaladabrasil.com/ may help you find a partner.

1.6.4. Chile 1,713 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -39.054012, -71.961119

1.6.5. Colombia 827 routes in Region

Access: COVID-19: Lockdown

Colombia has ordered a national lockdown from March 24.

See warning details and discuss

Created 7 months ago
Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 4.138637, -73.040481

1.6.6. Ecuador 223 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -1.587097, -78.275731

1.6.7. Falkland Islands 0 routes in Region

1.6.8. French Guiana 0 routes in Region

1.6.9. Guyana 0 routes in Region

1.6.10. Paraguay 0 routes in Region

1.6.11. Peru 632 routes in Region

Access: COVID-19: Lockdown

Peru has ordered a national lockdown from March 16.

See warning details and discuss

Created 7 months ago
Summary:
Sport climbing, Rock climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -9.070314, -74.540214

summary

Welcome to Perú! There is a lot to climb here, specially in the Cordillera Blanca area (Huaraz).

description

Most of the topos are here:

http://toposperu.com/

1.6.12. Suriname 0 routes in Region

1.6.13. Uruguay 0 routes in Region

1.6.14. Venezuela 126 routes in Region

Access: COVID-19: Lockdown

Venezuela has ordered a national lockdown from March 17.

See warning details and discuss

Created 7 months ago
Summary:
Sport climbing, Rock climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 7.194966, -66.171821

1.7. Europe 524,085 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 45.582523, 73.107638

1.7.1. Albania 81 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 41.097320, 19.995283

description

1.7.2. Andorra 407 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 42.545675, 1.577497

1.7.3. Austria 22,998 routes in Region

Access: Aktuelle Covid-19 Regeln & Klettern

Trotz der strengen Ausgangsbeschränkungen ist Klettern in Österreich weiterhin erlaubt, wenn auch mit gewissen Einschränkungen.

Details dazu findet ihr hier: https://kletterblock.de/de_DE/2020/11/kletter-und-freizeitbeschraenkungen-wegen-covid-19-in-oesterreich-aenderungen-am-15-november/

See warning details and discuss

Created 8 days ago
Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 47.625839, 13.314252

summary

Endless crags in the Eastern alps and the foothills of the alps offer climbing for everyone in every season.

description

Crags and areas are listed and managed according to the Alpine Club classification of the Eastern Alps (see also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpine_Club_classification_of_the_Eastern_Alps).

A map of areas can also be found here: http://www.bergalbum.de/uebersichtskarte_ostalpen.htm

1.7.4. Belarus 0 routes in Region

1.7.5. Belgium 5,700 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 50.516063, 4.449482

1.7.6. Bosnia and Herzegovina 1,011 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 43.846063, 17.677008

description

Climbing is slowly recovering in this country. Halted for about a decade by the war, a new generation of climbers has been opening crags and bolting routes.

This resulted in the publication of the magnificent guidebook which is not only a great guide to all crags in the country, but also a wonderful tourist guide.

1.7.7. Bulgaria 5,073 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 42.649112, 25.070017

description

Bulgaria is a country in South East Europe, with an area of 111,000 sq km, which offers climbing areas of all types:

  • bouldering,
  • sport climbing
  • traditional (up to 200 meter routes)
  • ice climbing (only in winter)
  • DWS.

Map of climbing areas (in Bulgarian) : http://www.climbingguidebg.com/cdb.php?smap=1 (also some topos)

Some area descriptions: http://climbing-in-bulgaria.blogspot.de/

1.7.8. Croatia 3,225 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 44.445535, 16.431620

description

Guidebooks:

  1. Croatia 2019 - ČUJIČ, Boris, 2019: Croatia: Climbing Guide. 8th edition, Astroida, p. 624.

  2. Adriatic Coast 2017 - Adriatic Coast: Italia - Slovenija - Croatia. Sidarta, 400 p. ISBN 9789616027816

1.7.9. Czechia 64,500 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Trad climbing

Lat / Long: 49.738643, 15.330933

description

Guides, routes and topos:

  1. Český horolezecký svaz - Czech Mountaineering Association: Database of routes, locations and map (czech).

  2. Skalní oblasti ČR: Route database and information about current moisture conditions and restrictions (czech).

  3. Lezec.cz - Czechclimbing.com: Climbing guides with topos, ascents (czech).

  4. Javaanes.cz- Crags in Moravia, climbing guides, topos (czech, ).

  5. Euroclimbing.com: Topos and some climbing guides (czech).

  6. Goat.cz: Topos and some climbing guides (mostly) in Moravia and Silesia (czech).

Information about climbing:

  1. Czechclimbing.com: Information about climbing in Czech Republic ().

  2. Euroclimbing.com: Information about climbing, equipement and new routes (czech).

  3. Horydoly.cz: Information about climbing and other outdoor activities (czech, , )

  4. Horyinfo.cz: Information about climbing, equipement and new routes (czech, , , ).

Maps:

  1. Skalní oblasti ČR: Moisture conditions map, Crags and climbing areas map, Climbing restrictions map.

  2. Horydoly.cz: Crags, huts, indoor climbing, tourist information map.

  3. Javaanes.cz: Crags and boulder fields map (Moravia and Silesia mostly).

  4. Horezdrar.cz: Crags and climbing areas map.

  5. Geoscience map - Czech Geological Survey: Geological informations and maps.

1.7.10. Denmark 501 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 56.084728, 10.708741

1.7.11. Estonia 1 route in Region

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: 58.707130, 24.878931

summary

description

1.7.12. Finland 1,054 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 60.993410, 24.190475

1.7.13. France 80,296 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: 46.205053, 1.485338

summary

Croissants, seas of sandstone boulders and scenic limestone sport crags.

description

France is a highly sought-after destination for climbing, and for good reasons. From classic sport crags to scenic multi-pitch adventures just above the water or 4,000m up an alpine peak, there’s a something for everyone here, all year round. And then, there’s the unforgettable food!

As a rule of thumb, the quality of climbing gets better and better as you go South, with some notable exceptions.

For bouldering (‘bloc’). About an hour away from Paris, Fontainebleau is a world-class bouldering area with more than 30,000 sandstone boulder problems. To the West, in the Bretagne region, you’ll find granite boulders right by the beach, such as in Pen-Hir and Kerlouan. In the South, check out Targassone, Annot, Ailefroide and many more.

For sport climbing (’escalade sportive’), there’s no shortage of world-class crags. Start with the classic areas such as Le Saussois, Les Calanques, Le Verdon, Buoux, Volx, Chateauvert, Orpierre, Mouries… and then head to the more ‘futuristic’ falaises such as Ceuse, Les Gorges du Tarn, Saint-Léger du Ventoux, Orgon, Les Gorges du Loup... the list goes on.

For trad climbing (‘escalade en terrain d’aventure’), head to Annot, le Vercors, but also Les Gorges du Verdon or even Ceuse.

Deep water soloing is also worth a mention with Les Calanques, La Ciotat, Les Gorges du Tarn, Les Gorges du Verdon and La Piade being hot spots in the summer months. Watch for tourists when jumping off!

Last but not least, climbing is also well developed in French islands such as Corsica, la Guadeloupe (Caribbeans) and l’Ile de la Reunion (Indian Ocean).

Bonne grimpe!

===

A few useful words:

  • Hi! | Salut!
  • Thank you | Merci
  • Please | S'il vous plait
  • Can you help me? | Pouvez vous m'aider?
  • One beer please! | Une biere patron!
  • Climbing | Escalade
  • To belay | Assurer
  • I'm looking for a belayer | Est-ce que quelqu'un peut m'assurer?
  • Where is the climbing area? | Ou se trouve le secteur d'escalade?

access issues

As of 2020, some privately owned climbing areas may have restricted access. Check with https://www.ffme.fr/

ethic

Park where indicated, take care of the environment, buy the local guidebook when possible (this is one of the ways you can help local route setters), clean up your shoes before climbing, don't spray beta, be polite.

Check https://www.gouvernement.fr/en/coronavirus-covid-19 for COVID-19 restrictions currently in place.

1.7.14. Germany 83,337 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 32.465477, 8.018434

summary

Beautiful landscapes, safe travelling and a lot of culture to enjoy.

description

Germany is a country in west-central Europe, that stretches from the Alps, across the North European Plain to the North Sea and the Baltic Sea.

Elevation ranges from the mountains of the Alps (highest point: the Zugspitze at 2,962 metres (9,718 ft)) in the south to the shores of the North Sea (Nordsee) in the northwest and the Baltic Sea (Ostsee) in the northeast. Between lie the forested uplands of central Germany and the low-lying lands of northern Germany (lowest point: Neuendorf-Sachsenbande at 3.54 metres (11.6 ft) below sea level), traversed by some of Europe's major rivers such as the Rhine, Danube and Elbe.

Other databases:

access issues

Covid 19: Please note that each federal state has its own rules about Covid 19!

1.7.15. Greece 10,929 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 38.044128, 24.554689

description

some overview of climbing areas at http://climbgreece.com

1.7.16. Hungary 2,197 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 47.141204, 19.446180

description

Check http://ludens.elte.hu/climb/climb.html for helpful information.

1.7.17. Iceland 152 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 65.085661, -17.422831

description

1.7.18. Ireland 2,694 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Trad climbing

Lat / Long: 53.167233, -8.608557

1.7.19. Italy 53,294 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 41.853315, 12.575062

1.7.20. Kosovo 0 routes in Region

1.7.21. Latvia 0 routes in Region

1.7.22. Liechtenstein 11 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Bouldering

Lat / Long: 47.141199, 9.552965

1.7.23. Lithuania 0 routes in Region

1.7.24. Luxembourg 209 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 49.779547, 6.098995

1.7.25. North Macedonia 282 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 41.593650, 21.703544

1.7.26. Repubblika ta’ Malta 676 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 35.928907, 14.421488

summary

Malta has about 700 sport routes, and 1500 trad routes. The majority are seldom climbed and don't suffer 'polishing'. There are many deep water solo and sea cliff traversing routes.

description

The Maltese rock sequence is divided into five main layers of limestone. Each layer has a distinct composition, as well as distinct properties. The lower coralline limestone is the oldest, and lowest layer. It is hard, and climbable. Victoria Lines, Wied Il-Għasel (Mosta Valley), Irdum Irxaw (Mistra), Ghar Lapsi, Wied Babu, Wied il-Mielaħ, Wied ix-Xlendi are lower coralline limestone. The upper coralline limestone is the youngest, and topmost layer. It is also hard, and climbable. Il-Latnija (Mellieħa Cave) and San Blas (Gozo) are upper coralline limestone.

access issues

Most crags enjoy easy access with short walk-ins, and most are accessible by bus. Be careful not to cross farmlands without permission.

approach

Sport Climbing in Malta & Gozo (2013) is the most recent guidebook containing ONLY sport routes. An update is in production and will be published in 2020.

Malta Rock Climbing the comprehensive guide (2007) is currently out of print but CAN BE RENTED, and contains trad routes.

where to stay

English is fairly widely spoken in Malta, so finding accommodation is relatively easy, but not particularly cheap. If you will rely on public transport, then Pembroke, Bugibba, or Mosta are a good choice.

ethic

Don't bolt here. There is a well established climbing community. If you seek to add routes contact either the Malta Climbing Club (UIAA affiliated) or the Malta Rock Climbing Club in Malta, or Stevie Haston in Gozo. All new routes are now being equipped with titanium bolts and anchors.

history

Fishermen and pirates have climbed these cliffs forever. The British forces in the 50's and 60's established a number of routes, mostly in Wied Babu, Xaqqa and Ghar Lapsi. Many new trad routes were set up in the 80s by visiting Brit climbers. Sport climbing took off in the 90s with many trad routes being retrobolted but also many new sport routes and crags being developed since then.

1.7.27. Moldova 6 routes in Region

Summary:
All Top roping

Lat / Long: 47.207723, 28.457614

1.7.28. Montenegro 392 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 42.715567, 19.249058

1.7.29. Netherlands 506 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Bouldering

Lat / Long: 52.203796, 5.289936

summary

No mountains, no rocks. Instead this country has climbing halls, artificial outdoor areas, and shady buildering areas.

description

The organisation for Dutch climbers is the NKBV

access issues

Be aware that climbing outside (buildering) in areas that are not explicitly "tolerated" or "designated" may be unwanted or illegal.

1.7.30. Norway 18,374 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: 69.428946, 14.133930

1.7.31. Poland 13,148 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 51.964174, 19.097003

1.7.32. Portugal 2,280 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: 35.941357, -18.849837

description

Location and topos of many areas in Portugal can be found here (click on map): http://climbingportugal.blogspot.com/

1.7.33. Romania 1,366 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 45.919964, 25.040950

description

Detailed topos and descriptions in English and Romanian: http://roclimbs.ro/EnDefault.aspx (the Romanian version of the site might contain more info)

Another info source (only in Romanian) is: http://eclimb.ro/

Another info source (Romanian/English) is: http://www.romaniaquest.com

1.7.34. Russia 1,928 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 63.451860, 106.619224

description

You can find nice topos on https://allclimb.com/en/

1.7.35. Serbia 737 routes in Region

Summary:
All Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 44.209832, 20.797368

1.7.36. Slovakia 9,837 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: 47.902719, 18.098083

ethic

1.7.37. Slovenia 3,348 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 46.118306, 14.816807

1.7.38. Spain 50,203 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 35.507386, -7.121869

1.7.39. Sweden 16,254 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 62.062119, 17.446308

description

Climbing with different characteristics and quality spread around the country. With some exceptions mainly single pitch and bouldering on granite. Areas worth to check out if visiting is Bohuslän, Västervik, Göteborg.

Overview of Swedish climbing areas: http://www.sverigeforaren.se

access issues

Please used designated parking areas. Check Sweden climbing association access database: http://access.bergsport.se/

1.7.40. Switzerland 32,404 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: 46.800005, 8.242850

summary

Bouldering, single and multi-pitch sport climbing, trad and alpine lines in the alps - Switzerland has it all. Crags for any season and any level, typically easy to reach and in stunning environments.

description

Switzerland contains three basic topographical areas: the Swiss Alps to the south (Alpen), the Swiss Plateau or Central Plateau (also called Mittelland), and the "Jura" mountains on the west.

All 3 areas offer plenty of climbing, obviously in very different environments.

The alps (Alpen) offer everything, from bouldering in world class spots such as Magic Wood, Cresciano or Chironico to name just a few to single- and multi-pitch sport climbing on all sorts of rock types and alpine climbs on some of the highest summits in the alps.

The Central Plateau (Mittelland) offers climbing and bouldering in a more gentle environment, often on the foothills of the alps or the base of the Jura.

The "Jura", being a much older mountain range than the alps, offers gentler slopes with elevations below 1800m ASL. Many of the climbing spots in the Jura have historic significance and are - due to their lower elevation and favourable climate - good for climbing year round.

Short distances, great public transport and a huge choice of climbing spots make Switzerland one of the most important climbing destinations in Europe.

approach

Switzerland is located in the center of Europe and easy to reach from almost anywhere.

1.7.41. Ukraine 4,031 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: 48.071269, 31.261615

description

1.7.42. United Kingdom 30,643 routes in Region

Summary:
Rock climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 55.347134, -3.114043

1.8. Africa 13,609 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -3.763564, 15.582118

1.8.1. Botswana 45 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -21.770767, 23.998176

1.8.2. Lesotho 47 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Sport climbing and Ice climbing

Lat / Long: -29.577778, 28.240819

1.8.3. Namibia 218 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -22.924461, 16.243284

1.8.4. South Africa 10,141 routes in Region

Access: COVID-19: Lockdown

South Africa has ordered a national lockdown from March 27.

See warning details and discuss

Created 7 months ago
Summary:
Trad climbing, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -28.455969, 24.655219

description

South Africa is simply a top world climbing destination.

From already world-renown Bouldering area Rocklands or Sport Mecca 'Waterval Boven', to epic trad Big Walling at Blouberg or Yellowwood Amphitheatre, passing through alpine adventures in the Drakensberg most styles are covered one way or the other, except maybe ice-climbing...

but that is only because of the generous climate, which ensures year-round outdoor climbing in most crags !

Add to that the comfort of huge areas close enough from town for a after-work pitch from Capetown... Table Mountain, or the huge potential for any adventurer to bush whack and find new unexplored cliffs hidden in remote areas... you will definitely find your little corner of paradise.

Finally the MCSA is the national association associated to UIAA that caters for mountaineering in general, and climbing in particular. They are fundamental to negociate and maintain access to lots of crags, since few are on public land in the country. Join them https://mcsa.org.za/.

1.8.5. Zimbabwe 0 routes in Region

1.8.6. Algeria 2 routes in Region

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: 28.273576, 2.692543

1.8.7. Egypt 195 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 26.577544, 30.204535

1.8.8. Libya 0 routes in Region

1.8.9. Morocco 1,033 routes in Region

Access: COVID-19: Lockdown

Morocco has ordered a national lockdown from March 21.

See warning details and discuss

Created 7 months ago
Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 31.859189, -6.538841

summary

1.8.10. Sudan 5 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Rock climbing and Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 16.125653, 30.189533

1.8.11. Tunisia 49 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 34.402544, 9.774815

1.8.12. Western Sahara 0 routes in Region

1.8.13. Burundi 0 routes in Region

1.8.14. Comoros 0 routes in Region

1.8.15. Djibouti 0 routes in Region

1.8.16. Eritrea 0 routes in Region

1.8.17. Ethiopia 60 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 8.600680, 39.509666

1.8.18. Kenya 1,287 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: 0.192176, 37.824517

summary

Kenya has lots of rock, from cragging at Lukenya to long mountain routes on Mt Kenya and remote bigwall climbing at Mt Poi.

©

description

All the descriptions for routes and areas in Kenya have been added by members of the Mountain Club of Kenya (MCK) and are under the club's copyright. Some of them come from old guidebooks so take them with a pinch of salt.

You can read more about the main climbing areas in Kenya here: https://www.mck.or.ke/rock-climbing-tips/

Please be aware that rescue is difficult in Kenya and access to first aid is limited, so you'll need to be mostly self-reliant.

You can become a member of the Mountain Club of Kenya, which makes you part of a community of outdorsy people in kenya, gives you access to discounts and helps promote rock climbing in Kenya. Here's how to join: https://www.mck.or.ke/membership/

The MCK owns land near Nairobi at a place called Lukenya, which is one of the most popular climbing spots in the country, accessible in around an hour from Nairobi. You can find more information about it on The Crag and here: https://www.mck.or.ke/lukenya-rock-climbing/

If you're going to Mt Kenya, please have a look at the page on TheCrag as well as this: https://www.mck.or.ke/rock-climbing-tips/mount-kenya/ The MCK is often getting request for information that can easily be found online, so please check these resources before contacting us with questions.

©

access issues

Access in Kenya ranges from very simple (especially in National Parks and Lukenya) to totally impossible.

Please do not pay to climb (outside of National Parks and Lukenya) as you'll ruin access for everyone else.

If you encounter any access issues, please notify the Mountain Club of Kenya so we can monitor and deal with it: https://www.mck.or.ke/contact

©

ethic

If you want to open new climbs in Kenya, kindly contact the Mountain Club of Kenya (www.mck.or.ke). We'll be happy to help!

Here is our bolting policy, please abide by it: http://mountainclubkenya.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Bolting-Policy.pdf

©

1.8.19. Madagascar 159 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -18.911966, 46.703271

1.8.20. Malawi 0 routes in Region

1.8.21. Mauritius 0 routes in Region

1.8.22. Mayotte 0 routes in Region

1.8.23. Mozambique 0 routes in Region

1.8.24. La Réunion 148 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -21.149835, 55.530787

1.8.25. Rwanda 22 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Rock climbing and Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -1.990655, 29.940542

1.8.26. Seychelles 0 routes in Region

1.8.27. Somalia 0 routes in Region

1.8.28. South Sudan 0 routes in Region

1.8.29. Swaziland 0 routes in Region

1.8.30. Uganda 159 routes in Area

Summary:
Sport climbing, Top roping and other styles

Lat / Long: 1.267187, 32.356613

summary

Most of UGs great rocks have never been climbed, so FAs abound! There is growing community and some good sport climbing too! It's a gorgeous country and a cheap destination for a climbing holiday.

©

description

Disclaimer

Uganda is an extremely diverse country. Annoyances and inconveniences may vary from region to region and village to village. What is agreed upon, accepted, or paid in one place may be rejected in another. What is safe one year or in one area may not be safe the next year or in a different region. Uganda, especially some areas, is also extremely remote. Some routes have only been climbed once. With so few climbers it has been impossible to fact check all route descriptions and difficulty grades. It is therefore possible that errors in route descriptions exist. Users of this guide must use their own judgment at all times. Neither the author, nor the publisher accepts any responsibility or liability for accidents or incidents that arise from consulting this book. This guide is intended for experienced climbers only. Climbing and mountaineering are inherently dangerous activities and one could be seriously injured or even killed. Inexperienced climbers should be discouraged from attempting the routes described in this book. Instead, inexperienced climbers should seek advice, help, and training from certified professionals.

Climbing and Mountaineering in Uganda

Uganda has arguably the best mountains in Africa. Tanzania claims the highest mountain (Kilimanjaro) and Kenya #2 (Mt. Kenya), but Uganda has huge mountains that are unspoiled, unique, remote, and see far fewer visitors. The incredible Rwenzori (third highest in Africa), are a true mountain range, soar over 5100m and contain glaciers on the equator! The virungas in the southwest have pristine trails, gorgeous jungles, rare mountain gorillas, and postcard quality bamboo zones. The peaks of Moroto, Kadam, Rom, Zulia, Napak and Morungole in Karamoja are almost completely unknown to the outside world and choke full of “raw” Uganda.

Uganda never had large numbers of European colonists or settlers like some regions of Africa. By comparison to Kenya, South Africa and Namibia, parts of Uganda have had very little European influence, hence there has been less climbing and less mountain exploration here. As I traveled around the country climbing, hiking, kayaking and looking for other adventures, I found climbable rocks and mountains mostly around the borders of the country. The British, under which Uganda was held as a protectorate until 1962, drew up the borders of the country using natural, geographic borders (mostly mountains), so following the land borders makes sense for climbers and mountaineers. In the west, the massive Rwenzori mark the border with the DRC. In the southwest, large Virunga peaks mark the corner of the country and follow it’s border with Rwanda. In the east, Mt Elgon marks the end of Uganda and the beginning of Kenya. In the south, Lake Victoria was used to mark the border, but in the north, no clear geographic border was used. Coincidentally or perhaps not, it is in Uganda’s north that has seen the lion’s share of trouble since decolonization. Until just a couple years ago, traveling in northern Uganda was not recommended. Travel restrictions have been lifted and today, the north represents the best place to see raw Uganda and the best place for climbers to explore. There are no huge mountains here, but plenty of big walls and 2000m mountains exist with no record of ever having been hiked. Very many beautiful and climbable faces have yet to be “discovered” and certainly many breathtaking, remote, and unspoiled treks have yet to be made known to the outside world.

Climate and Climbing Season in Uganda

The climbing season is year round, but parts of Uganda can be pretty hot with punishing sun, so early morning or early evening climbs are best. Some walls are shaded part of the day and I have tried to include that information in as many route descriptions as possible. Uganda lies on the Equator so sunrise and sunset are always right around 6:45-7:00 am/pm. The only noticeable seasons are “wet” and “dry”. Wet season months have been unpredictable in recent years and vary from region to region. i.e. the Rwenzori are almost always wet and best to hike in Dec-Feb when it is least wet. Kampala’s wettest months are April and November, but you can absolutely climb during those months. So, check climate graphs for the area you’re planning. Even though very heavy rainstorms can hit, they are usually brief. Terrible weather one afternoon can lead to great climbing the next morning as routes tend to dry out quickly. In the north, the best months are November to February. If you are heading for Mt. Oret, keep in mind that rock can hold water on the top/inside for days and takes a long time to dry out. The routes of Zigzag and Corporate Night will be very wet/slippery and might even run under small waterfalls even days after rain has stopped, so check the weather carefully and use your binoculars before starting up.

Dry season months, especially towards the end of dry season, have the benefit of less bush to contend with upon the approach and in the cracks and gullies. Bush is never a problem at the main/established crags like Pierre’s Quarry, Insita, Sipi’s Main Wall, Chema, Kkungu, Kilembe, and Rwakobo. The other sites are less well established, but have village/community trails very near to them. It is only the last few hundred meters of the approach that bush is ever an issue, but it can be a nightmare to get through. Plan accordingly. The routes on Amiel and Rwot can be bushy on much of the climb as well. Naita and Kilibi are excellent trad destinations as they dry fast and have pretty good trails very good trails leading right up or very near to the rock. I have done a lot of good outdoor climbing in all twelve months, but occasionally get really frustrated with a string of rainy days that can make some sites next to impossible.

Raw Uganda

I have traveled in every region of the country and been charmed again and again by Uganda’s charismatic people, geographic beauty and diversity. Most of the “new” routes we opened in the creation of this guide are in the far north. I love the north because of its rawness, but I also love it because it has very hard, good quality rock and more opportunities for real exploration and first ascents than elsewhere in Uganda. Plus, it is the cheapest part the country. Because of previous conflict in the north, it was ostensibly closed to climbers until just a few years ago, so I dedicated more time to exploring the north than to other, more well known regions. To be slightly more specific, I consider the north to be Karamoja, Acholiland, and West Nile. By far, Karamoja has the most promise for climbers and trekkers, however the entire north is ripe for exploration. Most of the known sport routes in Uganda are clustered around Kampala, not because these are the best rocks, but simply because most of the foreigners/expats/muzungus live in Kampala and have led the way in establishing the sport. Climbing is just starting to catch on among the Ugandan community and the first Ugandan climbing/trekking club, Uganda Mountain Slayers, was formed in 2015.

Possible Itinerary

The mountains and rocks in this guide mostly exist around the western, northern, and eastern edges. So, I would recommend beginning in the Virungas of the southwest, traveling to the Rwenzori in the west, then across the north and finish by working your way down to the Mbale around near Sipi Falls in the east, or start in Sipi and reverse. This could take anywhere from a couple weeks to several month depending on how “deep” you want to go…

Scope of this Guide

This book covers all known climbing in Uganda. It also covers most of the known hikes in the country. I have done these climbs and hikes personally.

Climbers in Uganda have only just scratched the surface of potential climbs in the country and this is unlikely to change in the immediate future given the remoteness of some of these places.

Note on Currency

We have listed everything in Uganda Shillings throughout this guidebook because that is the currency you will most likely be paying in. In my four years in Uganda, I have never heard of a local refusing US Dollars and I have even paid for things using Kenyan Shillings and Euros. I’m sure you can pay in other currencies as well but UG Shillings are the norm. It is very rare to find an ATM that will give out dollars. Forex currency exchange bureaus exist in all the larger towns. The bottom line is that you’ll most likely find yourself paying in shillings most of the time. Uganda Wildlife Authority readily accepts Uganda Shillings or US Dollars and they publish their exchange rate at the beginning of each month. At the time of writing in July of 2017, the exchange rate was 3602 UGX to 1 USD and UWA was using a rate 3600 to 1.

Uganda Wildlife Authority

UWA is responsible for ten national parks and charges foreigners 30-40 USD per day for entry. Some of the most fabulous mountains in Uganda lie within these parks so plan on paying these fees for the Rwenzori, Mt Elgon, and the Virungas (Muhabura, Sabinyo, and Gahinga). UWA also manages many wildlife reserves and sanctuaries. None of the rock climbing in this guide lay within UWA territory. The hikes of Moroto, Kadam, Napak, and Morungole also lie outside UWA parks and these hikes can be done without paying UWA fees. This book mainly aims to provide information on “outside the park adventures” as the parks are already well documented in other books and websites.

Phones in Uganda

Given the unreliability of phone numbers in the country, I have very sparingly included numbers in this guide. Many Ugandans have several numbers, often change numbers, phones go missing, get stolen, get spoiled, etc. I have included some very reliable numbers that I have used for several years.

However, not to worry! While traveling, I rarely call ahead and usually have no trouble showing up unannounced. I just ask for the person I am looking for and usually find them at home, in the bar, at a boda boda stage, or under the local mango tree! Communities are quite small and everyone knows everyone, so you will find who you are looking for pretty quickly, assuming you are in the right town!

Climbing Ratings

This book uses South African difficulty grades. This is a good system because, along with Aussie grades, has no decimal places, letter/number combinations, and +s, -s. It is a straightforward ordinal number grading system. Known grades in UG currently range from 8-25, which equates from roughly 2-7a in the French system, or 5.2 to 5.11d in YDS. Also most African countries already us SA grades and I hope by encouraging SA grades here, it will not only clearly communicate the difficulty of climbs to everyone in the easiest possible way, it will encourage all of Africa to have one unified grading system. South Africa, by far, leads the way in both sport and trad climbing on this continent, so they are the logical leader as well. Additionally, many climbers from SA visit UG and have encouraged the spread of this as the grading system in the country.

Most of the trad routes in this book have been climbed less than five times. Only Amiel (13) in Agago district has been trad climbed more than ten times in recent years. Several of the trad routes in this book have only been climbed once so use ratings with caution. Please send feedback to the author. Rating routes is a subjective “art” and discussions on ratings often end with some measure of disagreement. For all routes, I have consulted a number of climbers before publishing a difficulty grade, but as some of the routes are very rarely climbed, consulting many climbers was not possible in all cases.

Costs and Proceeds of this Book
I have kept costs to a bare minimum and bore those myself. All content will be freely given. The price for printed versions will only cover printing costs. The online content available at theCrag.com and ViewRanger has been made available at no cost.

Purpose of this Book

Uganda is a beautiful place, but also a tragic one. I have been fortunate enough to explore in every district of the country. I found many pleasant surprises and a few heartbreaking ones as well. Over my time here, more and more people began contacting me for information about the country and this grew to an almost daily occurrence. As my network grew, so did my knowledge of Uganda. More and more, I realized that a book like this needed to be written. Not only will this book share much of the knowledge I have gained whilst here, it will protect it as well. It is my hope that this publication will draw people to the rocks and mountains of Uganda. Through this, I hope visitors will do as I have done and try to leave this place in better shape than they found it. Travel responsibly.

Finding Climbing Partners in Uganda

The best way to find a climbing partner in Uganda is through the Mountain Club of Uganda. They maintain a closed Facebook group with over 4000 followers. Make sure to sign up for that group, answer the questions, and get accepted. Once in the group, simply post that you are looking for partners. You will probably find one within hours. If you are not on FB, you can write directly to the club to info@mcu.ug to request information about possible partners. Also, make sure to ask about Whatsapp groups as a large number exist and are also a great way to meet people and find climbers. Most of the climbers are based in Kampala though, so if you are on an expedition in the far north, finding a partner could be difficult. The MCU climbs regularly at Pierre’s Quarry in Kampala (Kyeitabya/Muyenga) and at Insita Rock (Luwazi) in nearby Kalagi (45 minutes from Kampala by car), and finding partners for these two sport crags should be pretty easy. Trips to Kkungu, Rwakobo and Sipi Falls are popular as well and finding partners for weekend trips to those sites it pretty easy.

Tip: many climbers here don’t have cars, so getting to some of the crags is tricky. If you have a car and want to climb, filling your seats with climbing partners will be no problem.

Note on Climbing Gear

In Uganda, you won’t find any for sale, except for occasional second hand stuff on Facebook. At the time of writing, only a couple dozen people in Kampala own ropes, probably less than twenty have quickdraws, and I only know of five people with trad racks. There are no commercial shops in Kamapala, or anywhere in the country for that matter that sell any climbing gear whatsoever, so bring everything with you. I have tried as much as possible to include the gear needed in each route description. At the time of writing I had placed a #5 Black Diamond cam a couple times and a #6 only once in UG! If you plan to explore trad, definitely bring a full rack with micros, lots of Alpine draws and plenty of slings.

Pay to Climb?

There are no places in Uganda that require any payment for climbing, though people will tell you otherwise. Almost everywhere you go someone is likely to ask for money. Here is a quick summary of what climbers tend to pay. At Luwazi, we pay 3k for parking at Ishma’s house. For that, he will look after your car and we have never had a security issue, though if you leave your phone lying on the rock unattended, local kids will snatch it up. You can also buy things from Ishma like samosas and fruit, but climbing is free. At the Pierre’s Quarry, you must be a Mountain Club of Uganda member. Membership is 50k per year. Membership gets you lots of discounts around Uganda and is usually more than worth it. Quarry access is granted by the landowner to the MCU only and the MCU has paid for all the bolting. The MCU has access to the indoor wall at ISU as well and more info can be found at that section. Access at the Sipi wall is free, though you will have to pay someone 2k for parking at Moses Camp. Locals will demand payment and even claim to own the rock, but that is not the case. Visit the Sipi police station and ask for protection if needed. Access at the Chema wall is also free, though you should pay 2k for parking at Colin’s shop in Chema. You should usually pay a local person a couple thousand shillings to “guide” you back to most of the crags. This is usually very helpful and appreciated by the local community. Parking and access to all other sites in Uganda is free. I sometimes offer a small gift if I am crossing someone’s land. For the very rural areas, folks sometimes ask for salt and I find a bag of salt to be an excellent gift. You can get bags of salt in local markets for around 700 UGX. As these communities cook communally, salt gets naturally shared amongst everyone. The same goes for other foodstuffs like rice, flour, and beans. I have also given t-shirts out as gifts, but have seen people argue over those. I once gave a curtain that I no longer needed from my house. That created a bit of a problem as one very old woman just took it and wrapped herself in it. The other old woman immediately pleaded with me for more curtains… Stick with instantly shareable gifts like mentioned above. I always pay something if I park my car on someone’s land. If they “mess” with my vehicle, then I do not pay. Most people have very few problems in Uganda, but close your windows, doors, and backpacks or people are likely to dig through your things looking for things you can share with them.

Hiring Hiking Guides

I strongly recommend that you hire guides almost anytime you walk more than a couple hundred meters from your car outside of a town. If you are in a UWA park, finding a trained guide is as simple as asking any park employee. However as this guide focuses on “outside the park adventures”, the following advice applies to the rest of the country. Here are some basic principles to follow.

  1. Everyone might say they are a “guide”. It can be really hard to tell who knows what they are doing and who does not. Use a reputable local contact to help you find a guide whenever possible. I frequently pull into local schools or monasteries. Ask for the father or headmaster. Explain your plans and ask for their help. This usually works. Then, test your guide with some non-leading questions and test their English before agreeing to anything. If there isn’t a school or monastery in sight, then drive as close as possible to the mountain or crag, just start walking in and find a guide along the way. I have found some of my best guides like this, as the people you run into on the path are very local and usually living or studying very nearby. Avoid trying to hire a guide in town centers. It can create quite a commotion and attract the wrong sort of people. Idle and available guides, often consuming alcohol at all times of the day are to be avoided for obvious reasons. Best to pick someone out in their field early “digging” or otherwise occupied. The payment they are likely to get from you is enough to motivate them to put other projects on hold for a day.

  2. Be very clear with your guide. Make sure to explain exactly what you plan to do and what you need the guide to help with. Agree on a set price beforehand. Do not pay in full until the trip is completed. In fact, try to hold back 50-100% of the payment until you are packed, finished and leaving. Paying for any services in full in Uganda ahead of time is often a bad idea. After paying in full, some guides may just run off. Also be aware that these guides may try to cut your trip short and still expect full payment. Even UWA guides have tried this with me. My guide on Kadam swore that terrible weather was coming and that we needed to turn around. My guide on Morungole tried to convince us that the peak was too far and that we couldn’t make it. Long story short, be skeptical of this sort of thing and make sure you know what you are doing. Cutting your trip short will save them time and effort. Of course, they will expect full payment in all cases, regardless of how far you’ve made it.

  3. Set clear rules with your guides. Quite often guides will take any “down payment” and buy waragi, a locally made gin. Sometimes they will chew a mild narcotic called kat as it can be found on some of the mountains. You may have to be quite vigilant with your guides to make sure they don’t end up drunk and/or mildly high. Also, it regularly happens that guides and porters will open your bags and go through your things on these hikes. Perhaps set a clear rule for them to leave your bags closed. It has happened to me on several occasions that guides/porters will consume some of the food/water in the pack they are carrying without asking permission. As frustrating as this might be for you, they don’t consider this inappropriate. Keep all your key valuables with you in your own pack. Remember outside UWA parks these “guides” lack the training and supervision of the somewhat more professional guiding services available inside parks.

  4. Plan on “taking care” of your guides. Most of the people you’ll find in these villages have very few possessions. So, plan on taking some food and water for them. They will not want to eat most things that you do, so get them some local food or ask them to bring their own. They will also not carry water, so plan for that. They usually drink about half as much as me. Finally, if your trip is overnight, you will need to carry everything your guide will need, so tent, sleeping bag, plate, cup, etc. Groups sometimes forget this and end up uncomfortably sharing food, utensils, tents, etc with their guides, or worse they have them sleep outside or send them down in the dark.

Misconceptions, Misunderstandings, and Perspective

Many local people will think you are rich. To them, you probably are. They may assume you are prospecting for gold, harvesting precious gems, or have other economic interests in their mountains and rocks, so they may ask again and again exactly where you are going and why. I think most of this curiosity comes from money concerns. If you use profession photographic equipment, they may assume you are making a profit from the photos somehow. “Muzungus carry gold in their boots” is a quote I’ve heard more than once. I have also come to understand Ugandans as a more communal people than I’ve ever seen. Land is family land and belongs to many people. You’ll find this out if you ever try to buy any. You may agree on a price to camp on someone’s land only to have a relative show up later and start the negotiations from the beginning. These issues can be complicated. Just be friendly, patient, and open-minded. Food is also shared. If you have surplus of pretty much anything, some local will want you to share it. There is evidence of this everywhere. For example in cases of theft, Ugandans very rarely steal everything. They may take your extra, but leave some behind. See, communal. Sharing is the Ugandan way.

As you can imagine this leads to misunderstandings that can sometimes be tense. I think many Ugandans struggle to understand why muzungus won’t share and many muzungus struggle to understand why Ugandans seem almost entitled to some of your money. It can also be very uncomfortable during packing and unpacking. Many local Ugandans will gather around and stare at you and all your stuff. Anything left lying out will likely get picked up. After all, if you left it out, you don’t want it anymore, right? My advice is to lock your things away, and if you can’t, keep things out of sight as much as, like inside a closed pack. Even cover your car windows if you can so people cannot see what is inside. Leaving gear strewn about is a sure way to lose a trinket or two. This is just good advice anywhere, but especially in Uganda.

Food in Uganda

Local food is probably the only option in many of the rural areas where you might climb. It usually consists of rice, posho, chapatti, cassava, sweet potato, Irish potatoes, greens, avocado, some tomato dishes and meat. Meat can be any common type like chicken, beef, goat, pork, or fish. Meat is usually prepared in a stew and served with rice or posho. It can also be grilled or smoked.

Finding and eating in a local restaurant is extremely easy, fast, and very cheap but very different to a cosmopolitan dining experience. First of all, finding one is very easy. They are near any town center and usually just have a small dining room and veranda. Look for steaming pots. People sit communally, sharing the tables and condiments, usually just salt and maybe chili flakes. Forget using a menu of any kind because it is too slow, too confusing, and not part of Ugandan dining culture. Rather, just ask, “Is the food there”? Restaurants in Uganda do not serve food all day, though dining hours are very flexible. If the food is ready, the response will be “it is there”. Follow up by asking what food is there and then you will get the list of what they have that day (see above). Sometimes the food is bubbling in pots right there or just outside, so just ask to see it if you wish. Stick with what is immediately available, hot and fresh as waiting/ordering may take hours and Ugandans often fail to communicate that clearly. For example, you might wait an hour for a dish just to be told it is not there. Once you order, it will usually come very fast, within a couple minutes and if it doesn’t, there is usually a problem. Prices vary from place to place and range from 1500 UGX for basic beans and chapatti (kikomando) to 8000 USX for a large meal with meat, greens, several types of starch, etc. I usually average 4-5k UGX per meal whilst in the “village” (rural areas). I find eating local in Uganda to be fantastic. The food is hot, fresh, and filling. Variety is very limited, though, and you may really start to miss your comfort foods after awhile. Mix it up by shopping and cooking or hitting one of the larger cities, some of which may have alternative cuisines.

Soft drinks are available nearly everywhere and cost 1500-2500 UGX. Beers cost about 3000 UGX outside of the big cities. Expat bars in Kampala or other cites may charge double for food and drinks.

If you are in Kampala, you can get all kinds of international cuisine, though the quality is not stellar and the prices are a bit high. Outside of Kampala, some cities may have a café or two and maybe Indian food. If you are lucky, you might find Ethiopian food in one place or another. There are lots of ethnic Indians and Ethiopians in Uganda and they have brought their excellent food with them. Cities like Gulu, Fort Portal, Kasese, Mbale, Kbale, Entebbe, Lira, Jinja, Mbarara, and Masaka are probably big enough to have a café, Indian place, and/or pizza available. Outside these cities, only the expensive lodges will serve international dishes. So, outside the large cities and lodges, you’ll have to “go local”.

Dangers

As of 2017, Uganda is an extremely safe country. I have only been chased off a crag once. That’s it. I think driving/road accidents are probably the biggest threat. Lots of folks get hurt on boda bodas (motorcycle taxis) and that is one of the riskiest things you can really do in the country. It is not recommended to take bodas at night. Theft is common, but it is usually petty theft and rarely violent. Watch out for drunkards. They are more aggressive and may pick a fight or cause other harm, but not more so than in other countries.

Malaria tends to hit everyone that has been in the country long enough, though some are here for years before getting it the first time. Typhoid also tends to hit everyone here for a while. I got vaccinated and still got it eventually. Traveler’s diarrhea and other food poisoning are common. Everyone that gets in the water much, goes sailing, rafting or kayaking gets bilharzia eventually and we have just learned to accept that can take the necessary treatment a couple times a year.

Some of the routes have been climbed so rarely that large, loose rocks still pose risks. Other than that, climbers often see snakes, but I don’t know of anyone who has been bitten. Bees are quite common in some crags, so if you come across a hive, just try to keep your head and gently move past them or out of their way. Easier said than done…

Accommodation

Like with eating, adjusting to local standards can make your trip much more convenient, cheaper and more of an adventure. Rooms in Ugandan guesthouses usually run from 10k to 30k per night. Paying 30-40k should get you a self-contained room and maybe even hot water. Paying closer to 10k will get you a very basic room, probably lacking a chair or table and bathroom. The cheapest rooms will have cold, bucket showers and shared pit latrine toilets. Local guesthouses are easy to find and are near town centers. All rooms should have a bed, pillow, sheets and a mosquito net. If you tend to be cold blooded, ask for an extra blanket. Nicer guesthouses will have some furniture, inside the compound parking, a basic garden and maybe a swimming pool.

Very nice lodges exist near the larger towns and national parks. You can get rooms for 50-500+ USD per night and these places are great!

Camping is allowed in loads of places as well. If you are on a very tight budget and/or want to sleep right at the crag, take your tent. Locals will usually let you camp right on their land for free or just a few thousand shillings. I have often done this. If you are worried about security, parking and camping within the grounds of a school or church might be safer. In that case, there is usually a night guard and you should pay something or leave a small donation. Lots of proper campsites exist too, usually near the main attractions and parks. Camping at a proper campsite is usually more expensive than local guesthouses because this is a tourist/muzungu activity and therefore prices are higher. Such camping usually includes access to showers, sometimes even hot ones, communal toilets and may include tea/coffee and a light breakfast.

Note on Transportation

All of these climbs can be reached through a combination of public transport and boda boda hire (motorcycle taxis). However, most climbers in Uganda have cars or ride with friends. It’s hard to do much climbing in Uganda if you don’t have a car or stay very near to the crag.

Driving in Uganda Any four-wheel drive can get you all around Uganda. The main roads rarely wash out. Road construction is ongoing and may slow you down. Potholes will cause significant wear and tear on your car. During rainy season, some village roads are likely to be impassible. Large, Land Cruiser or Defender type vehicles are the best, but small SUVs like Rav4s also do great.

There is wide disparity in the quality of fuel available at a hodge podge of petrol stations. Best advice is to always fill up at one of the very well known stations like Shell or Total, otherwise your car might run a bit funny. All the major towns have a major petrol station. If you are in a very rural area, you might have no other choice but to fill up locally. If you are very worried about this, take a jerry can of fuel with you, though the major towns are all close enough together that this really isn’t necessary.

Google Maps and other interactive online maps cover the country, but are quite inaccurate sometimes so use them with caution. Asking for directions can be hard because it is common for Ugandans to always answer when asked, even if they have no idea what you are asking. Just ask several people to see this in action, as they are likely to point you in totally different directions. The boda boda drivers tend to know their way around the best, so just ask one to show you the way and follow the boda in your car. That can work if their verbal instructions are difficult to understand.

Car Rental You can get rental cars from the airport in Entebbe. Tour companies also sometimes rent. Also, lots of Ugandans rent out their cars informally. For example, my mechanic rents a variety of cars for 50-100k per day. Just ask around to find the option you want. Even asking a taxi or Uber driver from the airport will likely lead you to a cousin or uncle that has a car for rent. These will be cheaper than the international car hire agencies, but may lack maintenance, support, and the professionalism as well.

Public and other Transport There is a system of buses and matatus (taxi) that cover nearly all the roads in Uganda. These are quite cheap and getting information is as simple as asking around in any town center. They are usually a bit uncomfortable, slow, crowded and very dusty. A ride from Kampala to Moroto might take you 12-15 hours on a bus while the same car ride takes around nine hours. I have almost always moved around Uganda by car. Once off the bus/taxi, people use boda bodas (motorcycle taxi) for shorter trips. They are fast, fun and cheap, but dangerous. Be ready to tell your boda driver puli puli if they are going too fast. Some of these guys seem to have no fear! Uber works throughout Kampala and exists in some of the large cities. If you need a ride, just ask around a bit. I often ask a guesthouse guard (askari) to help me find a reliable ride.

Electricity

Power goes out almost daily in the large cities, is regularly out in the smaller cities and some towns and villages still have no power except a few solar lights and batteries. So, carry a solar light, head torch, extra batteries, and a power bank for your phone, etc. Always keep a head torch near you at night. Keep batteries fully charged or nearly so. So if the power is “there”, plug in. Uganda has the same plug as the UK, so adaptors are really easy to find. Definitely bring a USB adaptor for a car as that is a handy way to charge a phone should all your other options run out.

The Best Advice…

Probably the most useful piece of advice I can give is to never rush conversations with Ugandans. It gets their backs up. They become apprehensive and seem to assume you either don’t respect them or are up to no good. I try to talk to Ugandans until they seem bored with me, which doesn’t take long. Small talk goes a long way. I have been “detained” a couple times in Uganda by police and or park rangers. In all cases, after fully hearing out what they had to say, making small talk and having a few laughs, I made new friends and walked away either for free or for a small fine paid for whatever perceived infraction I had committed. This can be annoying, but keep in mind that many places in Uganda see very few outside visitors. Your visit is often quite interesting and exciting for the locals, so do yourself and them a favor by spending a few minutes chatting. I’ve done this all over the country and it has always made things go more smoothly.

ViewRanger, theCrag.com, GPS, Google Earth and Navigation for the Hikes and Climbs

There are free downloads of .gpx files for all the hikes and climbs in this book. For hiking routes, go to the ViewRanger website, search in Uganda under the hike name and download the tracks to your phone, gps or computer. You can load and follow these tracks using a number of free smartphone apps like ViewRanger or OSMand. For the climbing crags, you can download the navigation files from theCrag.com. Once on that website, go to Uganda and simply select the crag you want. On the crag’s map, click the download button and you’ll find options for either .gpx files or .kml file downloads. Again, the .gpx files can be loaded on your phone using ViewRanger or OSMand or a similar smartphone app. The .kml files are compatible with Google Earth.

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access issues

Access is freely granted almost everywhere by a warm local welcome. Most Ugandans are extremely poor by comparison to most travelers, so they might expect climbers to share or give something. Climbers are not obliged to give anything in most cases, but giving a little something small can go a long way.

Rather than giving handouts, I look for every opportunity to pay Ugandans for useful goods and services. That might be paying a guide or porter, or hiring someone to look after my car. Additionally, I agree to give donations to schools and churches if I camp on their property. I regularly give 2-5k UGX for parking on someone's land. I also buy local produce, stay in local guest houses, and eat locally. I try to always mention that I am climbing or hiking and also try to thank everyone for welcoming me into their community. Through this, I hope to give positively to these communities and build a positive impression of climbers and hikers in all these communities. I hope this will not only boost the local economy, but help pave the way for more adventurers to come and explore this amazing country.

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approach

Most people get to Uganda by plane. Entebbe International Airport is a 1-4 hour drive depending on traffic. Outside Kampala, traffic times are much more predictable.

You can also easily get to Uganda by bus. Daily buses come in from Rwanda via Kigali or Kenya via Nairobi.

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ethic

Climbing is mostly unknown in Uganda. Please do climbers a favor and build a positive impression in the country through exemplary behavior and conscientious contributions to the communities you visit.

©

history

Climbing came to Uganda with the British who ruled it as a protectorate until 1962. The first climbing guide was published in that year. A supplement to the first guide was published in 1963. In 1991 an updated climbing guide was reprinted, but contained very few new routes/crags.

The Idi Amin years saw climbing and mountaineering activities cease. The Bush War prevented the same in the 1980s. The LRA War and general banditry in Northern Uganda and Karamoja prevented climbing and mountain exploration well beyond 2000, however climbing and exploring was common in Central, East, and West during the 90s and beyond. It was not until 2013 that climbing and mountain exploration began to take place all over Uganda, including West Nile, Acholiland, and Karamoja and these regions are now ripe for further exploration. This book only scratches the surface of this amazing country.

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1.8.31. Tanzania 2 routes in Region

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -6.342246, 35.144435

1.8.32. Zambia 0 routes in Region

1.8.33. Benin 0 routes in Region

1.8.34. Burkina Faso 0 routes in Region

1.8.35. Cabo Verde 0 routes in Region

1.8.36. Cote d'Ivoire 0 routes in Region

1.8.37. Gambia 0 routes in Region

1.8.38. Ghana 33 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 7.792033, -1.184908

1.8.39. Guinea 0 routes in Region

1.8.40. Guinea-Bissau 0 routes in Region

1.8.41. Liberia 0 routes in Region

1.8.42. Mali 2 routes in Region

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: 17.347218, -3.518101

description

Hand of Fatima Massif

1.8.43. Mauritania 0 routes in Region

1.8.44. Niger 0 routes in Region

1.8.45. Nigeria 0 routes in Region

1.8.46. Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha 0 routes in Region

1.8.47. Senegal 0 routes in Region

1.8.48. Sierra Leone 0 routes in Region

1.8.49. Togo 0 routes in Region

1.8.50. Angola 0 routes in Region

1.8.51. Cameroon 0 routes in Region

1.8.52. Central African Republic 0 routes in Region

1.8.53. Chad 0 routes in Region

1.8.54. Republic of the Congo 0 routes in Region

1.8.55. Democratic Republic of the Congo 0 routes in Region

1.8.56. Equatorial Guinea 0 routes in Region

1.8.57. Gabon 0 routes in Region

1.8.58. São Tomé and Príncipe 2 routes in Region

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: 0.811341, 6.936032

1.9. Middle East 4,518 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 29.198207, 46.307161

1.9.1. Armenia 127 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: 40.162546, 45.021800

1.9.2. Azerbaijan 0 routes in Region

1.9.3. Cyprus 69 routes in Region

Summary:
All Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 35.168912, 33.434322

1.9.4. Georgia 177 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 42.226135, 43.120766

1.9.5. Israel and Palestine 1,002 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 31.553528, 35.049873

1.9.6. Iran 254 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 32.333138, 54.120597

1.9.7. Iraq 0 routes in Region

1.9.8. Jordan 490 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 31.279952, 37.129394

summary

Jordan is a country to experience pure wild adventure, outstanding hospitably and unique cultures. Feel welcomed by the locals and exhilarated by the sandstone.

description

There are many excellent limestone sport crags north of the capital Amman, with over 200 routes to date. Most routes were bolted by Wolfgang Vogl and local climbers.

Hidden in the northern crags there are some rare limestone trad lines to discover.

New sport climbing areas south of Amman have been developed, but the main attraction is Wadi Rum.

Wadi Rum is a desert wilderness with towering sandstone massifs which has more than 1000 trad routes established; the jewels of which are the traditional Bedouin hunting routes.

Modern Wadi Rum climbing was developed in the 80s by European parties, with a good majority established and rediscovered by Tony Howard who went on to write a comprehensive guide book with successive updates.

Very recently Wadi Rum has seen the development of sport climbing with some huge and demanding routes established.

ethic

1.9.9. Liban 146 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 33.910896, 35.682946

description

1.9.10. Oman 76 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and Rock climbing

Lat / Long: 23.164440, 58.032281

1.9.11. Saudi Arabia 76 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 24.033198, 43.907268

1.9.12. Syria 0 routes in Region

1.9.13. Turkey 2,062 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 39.050751, 34.436658

summary

Turkey offers all varieties of climbing in many different settings. From big sport climbing holiday destinations to bouldering spots or alpine style climbing areas there is something for everyone.

description

A lot of climbing can be found along the coast from Izmir to Antalya with some of the very famous spots like Geyikbayiri, Datca or Bafa. But also the center, the east and the area around Istanbul offer a lot of climbing with endless potential for more. Most climbing is well equipped sport climbing, excellent bouldering and also some multi-pitch climbing. You can find spots for any season and any ability.

approach

It is easy to fly into Turkey from anywhere. Depending on your destination you might choose Istanbul, Izmir, Antalya or any of the other many international airports.

1.9.14. United Arab Emirates 34 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Trad climbing

Lat / Long: 24.204106, 54.438976

1.9.15. Yemen 5 routes in Region

Summary:
All Trad climbing

Lat / Long: 15.444582, 47.705978

1.10. Asia 20,540 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: 25.782792, 104.607889

1.10.1. Afghanistan 2 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing and Rock climbing

Lat / Long: 33.854527, 66.217229

1.10.2. Bangladesh 0 routes in Region

1.10.3. Bhutan 15 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 27.382118, 90.458332

1.10.4. Brunei 0 routes in Region

1.10.5. Cambodia 46 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: 12.807265, 105.102010

description

1.10.6. China 7,396 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 35.827726, 104.325146

summary

China has one of the fastest growing climbing communities in the world. It covers a huge landmass that allows for all styles of climbing on all sorts of rock types.

description

The most popular areas are Yangshuo in Guangxi Province and Getu in Guizhou but lately Yunnan province is being fastly developed thanks to the unique landmark of Liming, a trad and now also a sport climbing paradise, and Shigu for sport climbing, may soon become one of the top destination for rock climbing in China. But there is climbing almost everywhere in China and many more areas to be developed.

1.10.7. Hong Kong 1,988 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: 22.335896, 114.187048

summary

Mostly granite on the inner hills and vast quartzite formations by the coastlines.

description

With its 1000 sport routes spread over more than 30 crags, Hong Kong can be considered among the best rock climbing destinations in Asia.

https://hongkongclimbing.com/

Topo for sport routes (2020) : https://climbingboltsupplies.com/products/hong-kong-rock-2020-edition

approach

Easy access to most crags with public transportation arriving as close as 10 minutes walk in some cases.

history

The history of rock climbing in Hong Kong starts in the 50s following the British wave of explorers.

Interesting reading, a guide to Hong Kong Rock Climbing from 1968 : http://hongkongclimbing.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/a_guide_to_rockclimbinginhongkong.pdf

1.10.8. India 580 routes in Region

Access: COVID-19: Lockdown

India has ordered a national lockdown from March 24.

See warning details and discuss

Created 7 months ago
Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 21.842080, 82.626093

1.10.9. Indonesia 379 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: -2.703514, 117.149360

summary

Indonesia have 7 regions with 34 provinces. Have a lots of potential new area that ready to be develop.

1.10.10. Japan 1,899 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: 37.840947, 138.444187

summary

Japan offers a wide range of climbing from bouldering to alpine style multi pitch routes on various rock types and for all seasons.

description

The climbing is split in sport and trad climbing and there are spots to climb all year round, from sea cliffs to higher altitude spots in all grades. The climbing community is very active but also very Japanese which means that for foreigners it is sometimes hard to find information.

access issues

Some spots have access issues as many spots near crowded places elsewhere. So please ensure you follow the recommendations of local climbers and behave responsibly.

ethic

There`s not a lot of information about climbing in Japan in English. Much of the information is only available in Japanese - or of course here on theCrag!

The Japan Free Climbing Association (http://freeclimb.jp/seibi/seibi.htm) is a good point of contact and there is a set of 5 guidebooks (all in Japanese) and an alpine guide book in English available covering all of Japan and its thousands of sport and trad routes and boulders.

http://www.yamakei.co.jp/products/2811180810.html

https://www.amazon.com/Classic-Alpine-Climbs-Japan-Climb-ebook/dp/B01ARU5KR0

1.10.11. Kazakhstan 149 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and Rock climbing

Lat / Long: 48.413462, 67.700094

description

Kazakh Mountaineering Federation (in Russian and English): http://www.mountain.kz/en

blog with topos and great photos (in Russian): http://steelinside.com

1.10.12. Kyrgyzstan 10 routes in Region

Summary:
All Rock climbing

Lat / Long: 41.434927, 74.581959

1.10.13. Laos 631 routes in Region

Access: COVID-19: Lockdown

Laos has ordered a national lockdown from March 30.

See warning details and discuss

Created 7 months ago
Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 18.789659, 103.535073

summary

Laos offers more climbing than you might think. Of course there is the major spot near Thakek but many other smaller ones are worth exploring.

approach

Laos is easy to travel to, most people do it over land coming from Thailand or Vietnam. Reaching the major tourist destinations near Vientiane or Thakek is easy by public transport, from there it is often just a short hop to the climbing destinations.

1.10.14. Macao 0 routes in Region

summary

Many potential boulder problems and routes near the beach located at the southeast.

1.10.15. Malaysia 1,022 routes in Region

Access: COVID-19: Lockdown

Malaysia has ordered a national lockdown from March 18.

See warning details and discuss

Created 7 months ago
Summary:
Sport climbing, Bouldering and other styles

Lat / Long: 4.680482, 109.909361

description

One of the country from the South East Asia.

1.10.16. Mongolia 0 routes in Region

1.10.17. Myanmar 25 routes in Region

Summary:
All Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 19.371057, 96.461086

1.10.18. Nepal 28 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Alpine climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 27.872952, 86.182970

summary

It is famous for its mountaineering and its big wall climbing opportunities.

description

Nepal is a small, landlocked, mountainous country in Southern Asia. It is a rugged, very mountainous country and extremely remote in parts.

approach

Nepal's Capital, Kathmandu, can be accessed via airplane from neighbouring countries.

where to stay

There are many levels of acccommodation available in Nepal, from camping to luxury hotels and lodges.

1.10.19. North Korea 0 routes in Region

1.10.20. Pakistan 42 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Alpine climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 35.317808, 74.201686

1.10.21. Philippines 306 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 11.423386, 121.965690

summary

Lots of variety, bouldering, sports, trad and keen friendly locals. Lots of development potential.

description

The Philippines is divided into 1000s of islands in a tropical climate and has much to explore for the intrepid traveller and climber. As per much of South East Asia the Philippines has an abundance of karst limestone but it also has a mix of rock types with some cool bouldering up in the mountains and DWS down by the sea.

access issues

See each area as it is common to have to pay a small fee at each area for the maintenance of tracks, facilities and cleaning!

approach

See each area, some easy, some can be more involved and part of the experience.

where to stay

Can be done cheaply or expensively.

ethic

Sports, mixed, trad and bouldering all appear.

1.10.22. South Korea 2,777 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 36.029950, 127.757587

description

Climbing in South Korea is an awesome experience. There is rock everywhere, predominantly granite. The locals are amazing, too. Even if you have a language barrier, they are really accepting and you can usually figure it out with hand signals.

Crags can get pretty crowded on the weekend, especially around the Seoul area.

The locals tend to sandbag their ratings a little. Each group tends to have its own favorite spot; they have the routes wired pretty tight, so they can think a route is easier than it really is.

1.10.23. Singapore 104 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 1.321874, 103.826507

description

Dairy access is made from parking B on dairy farm road just before upper Bukit timah road. Follow the trail that goes to dairy farm quary

1.10.24. Sri Lanka 16 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing and Bouldering

Lat / Long: 6.506374, 80.918508

1.10.25. Taiwan 648 routes in Region

Summary:
Trad climbing, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 23.784615, 121.004017

1.10.26. Tajikistan 7 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and Bouldering

Lat / Long: 38.372420, 70.925049

1.10.27. Thailand 1,869 routes in Region

Summary:
Mostly Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 13.081878, 101.614692

description

Read this cautionary tale about bolts in Thailand and what's being done

http://upskillclimbing.blogspot.com/2011/03/titanium-bolts-answer-for-thailand.html

1.10.28. Turkmenistan 0 routes in Region

1.10.29. Uzbekistan 0 routes in Region

1.10.30. Vietnam 597 routes in Region

Summary:
Sport climbing, Deep water soloing and other styles

Lat / Long: 16.561218, 106.539770

1.10.31. East Timor 4 routes in Region

Summary:
All Bouldering

Lat / Long: -8.802098, 126.012816

1.11. Arctic Region 35 routes in Region

Summary:
Alpine climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 72.081407, -12.170754

1.11.1. North Pole 1 route in Crag

Summary:
All Alpine climbing

Lat / Long: 84.932991, -9.667969

1.11.2. Greenland 34 routes in Crag

Summary:
Alpine climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 71.478042, -12.170754

description

Greenland (/ˈɡriːnlənd/; Greenlandic: Kalaallit Nunaat, pronounced [kalaːɬit nunaːt]; Danish: Grønland, pronounced [ˈɡʁɶnˌlanˀ]) is an autonomous constituent country within the Kingdom of Denmark between the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans, east of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Though physiographically a part of the continent of North America, Greenland has been politically and culturally associated with Europe (specifically Norway and Denmark, the colonial powers, as well as the nearby island of Iceland) for more than a millennium. The majority of its residents are Inuit, whose ancestors began migrating from the Canadian mainland in the 13th century, gradually settling across the island.

Read more on Wikipedia

1.12. Antarctica 22 routes in Region

Summary:
Rock climbing, Alpine climbing and Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -72.788121, 58.852387

1.12.1. Livingston Island 18 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Rock climbing

Lat / Long: -62.531355, -60.200382

1.12.2. Queen Maud Land 4 routes in Area

Summary:
Alpine climbing and Trad climbing

Lat / Long: -73.497682, 91.716039

description

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_Maud_Land

1.13. Virtual 1,489 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering and Rock climbing

1.13.1. Contain COVID-19 224 routes in Gym

Summary:
All Rock climbing

summary

This is a virtual gym, representing your home, your garden, wherever you are allowed to train in times of Covid 19.

description

Track you training exercises from the list of routes below and participate in the "Train at Home Competition".

Feel free to add additional exercises and motivate everyone else to perform them.

Load pictures about your training exercise and your setup to this gym and mark them with hashtag #covid19 , #trainathome or #sportividacasa.

Points

If you log your exercise here you will take part in the La Sportiva Train at Home Contest. The contest takes the route length field into account. One repetition of a single exercise counts as 1 point (1m of height). Rests don't count of course If you want to add workouts from you training schedule or your favourite app then calculate the points (height) as follows:

Points for pullups (p) in a row: height = ceil(p * p / 4)

free exercises: find something comparable - keep in mind that 20 pullups in a row counts 100m.

approach

This is "everyone's home" - so you should find the way.

1.13.2. Lattice Gym 153 routes in Gym

Summary:
All Rock climbing

summary

These are the excercises from the Lattice training program. For details visit the Lattice Team.

description

Record your training excercises using the ticking interface. It is recommended to enter comments about how you feel and other details as ascent comment per excercise.

As for the number of sets, the recommended way is to enter it also as ascent comment (e.g. 3 sets) but alternatively you may record them as additional shots for each excercises performed.

Look at your ascents for the virtual Lattice Gym to see your training history by clicking on the Logbook tab on top.

If you want to add additional execrises, just Request Permissions (button on top). Please try to fit them in the structure of the gym. You may add descriptions, links to videos and photos. Please do not upload copyrighted material!

Questions and comments to exercises, the setup here or whatever can be raised by clicking on the Forum tab and starting a discussion. You may do so on Gym or exercise group level.

1.13.3. Moonboard 1,112 routes in Gym

Summary:
All Bouldering

1.14. test area 1,831 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -63.177858, -56.648254

1.14.1. Sandpit 153 routes in Crag

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -18.862514, -39.749707

description

This is just a pretend area created for making screen casts, etc.

> quote

blah

1.14.2. Other test stuff 142 routes in Crag

Summary:
Rock climbing, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: -8.039239, -23.986182

summary

test

1.14.3. To be deleted 1,109 routes in Crag

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 3.186018, 27.142646

summary

Work in progress, will be re-parented to relevant parent when fit for release

description

Nice hike.

1.14.4. Don't delete these 43 routes in Crag

Summary:
Bouldering, Rock climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 36.589460, -118.290580

description

These routes are parked here because of access issues at the crag. Maybe one day we'll be able to reinstate them!

1.14.5. David Test 3 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Trad climbing

description

A quick test area

1.14.6. Tom's Test Area to be merged 7 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Bouldering

1.14.7. Steintestosteron 110 routes in Crag

Summary:
Sport climbing, Trad climbing and other styles

Lat / Long: 21.884078, -12.574184

description

Restricted area !

Please do not delete or change. It's not just a test! In parts it´s a draft, it's also used for testing, as demo area and a kind of memory aid as well.

1.14.8. Steinprojekt 36 routes in Unknown

Summary:
Mostly Trad climbing

Lat / Long: 49.597049, 12.250735

description

please do not delete

1.14.9. Anderl's test region 28 routes in Region

Summary:
Bouldering, Sport climbing and Trad climbing

Lat / Long: 38.790530, -9.357157

1.14.10. Sample gyn 1 route in Gym

Summary:
All Sport climbing

1.14.11. Can Marges 0 routes in Crag

1.14.12. Old Gym walls 39 routes in Gym

Summary:
Sport climbing and Bouldering

1.14.13. Rock (Geology) 0 routes in Area

description

access issues

approach

Table of all climbrocks including links to more detailed info: https://www.durreck.de/wp/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/climbrock-englisch.pdf

where to stay

1.14.14. Kanonenwandl 0 routes in Unknown

description

Private Area

1.14.15. Les Rochers d'Eveux 0 routes in Crag

description

1.14.16. Les anciens fours à chaux 0 routes in Sector

1.14.17. Never Never 28 routes in Area

Summary:
Sport climbing and Rock climbing

summary

A selection of quality climbs on crown land, in a serene and stunning location. Fire Wall through to Liquid Sunshine have morning shade fantastic on cooler days. The Point through to Hippocampus is like a different world with morning filtered sun till around midday, shaded all afternoon with light sea breezes in summer.

description

An asethetic, flowy sandstone cliff overlooking a secluded valley not far from Berowra Creek Estuary and the mega dws of Craftys Bay.

approach

An easy 20 minute (5km) bike ride or approx 55 minute walk along a mostly flat fire trail bordering Marramarra NP.

history

First discovered by Ado on a hiking mission over the winter of 2016 with some intial investigations into the climbing terrain.

Spring 2019 saw phyche from Al and the momentum got the cogs turning and new routes added rapid fire.

With the bearing heat of summer fast approaching, developments eased, only to renew with vigor early 2020.

With ideal temps stubborn projects would be sent and all the people of Never rejoiced! :p

1.14.18. Dominik's Den 11 routes in Crag

Summary:
Rock climbing, Sport climbing and Bouldering

1.14.19. 岩花岩 0 routes in Cliff

1.14.20. 枯枝岩 0 routes in Cliff

1.14.21. Combis 0 routes in Crag

description

Because this crag is rather small, the guidebook also features some combinations of routes. These are listed here.

1.14.22. Rochers de Thon-Samson 0 routes in Crag

description

1.14.23. L'Arche 0 routes in Sector

1.14.24. Nomad Boulders 0 routes in Gym

description

Opent zomer 2020.

Instagram

approach

Condensatorweg 48, Amsterdam

1.14.25. Sample Area 18 routes in Area

Summary:
Sport climbing and Bouldering

description

This area contains sample routes for logging routes not exsiting on the crag.

1.14.26. Sarajevo & Eastern Bosnia 0 routes in Crag

1.14.27. Banja Luka 0 routes in Region

summary

delete me

1.14.28. Classiques 0 routes in Sector

1.14.29. Hauteroche 38 routes in Crag

Summary:
All Sport climbing

Lat / Long: 50.083260, 4.597590

description

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