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Grades

Grade systems are almost as old as climbing itself. Assigning a difficulty to a climb seems to be at least as important as describing it with other characteristic parameters such as length, protection or rock type. Grade systems initially developed in confined geographical areas, making the comparison of climbs somewhat easier, developed over time and were and are constantly extended as climbers manage to ascent harder and harder climbs. For example the now called UIAA grade system had a top grade of VI (six), meaning that everything harder than VI was simply assigned a VI until it was finally opened up in the late 1970s.

Even today, many grade systems are confined to certain geographical areas, sometimes climbing areas (e.g. Saxon, Fountainbleau), mostly countries (South African, Brazilian, French, etc.) or even continents (Ewbanks, YDS) and sometimes they got exported to and established themselves in different areas making some grade systems more ubiquitous than others.

Most grade systems are specific to a certain style. There are grade systems for bouldering, grade systems for sport climbing, grade systems for aid climbing and so on but even grade systems for the same style don’t always translate well between each other. The reason being that the width of grades on a specific scale are not comparable or that grades are not linear across the whole scale.

For you as a climber this means, that it might be sometimes quite tricky to accurately convert a specific grade from one grade system into another one; for us as a global information and services provider it is a challenge to display all grade information in the context the user wants to see it and use it accurately for rating and ranking purposes.

Together with the rock climbing community theCrag developed and continuous to develop a comprehensive and intuitive coverage of grades in the system. As such we welcome feedback on grades and new developments in that area. However, for this to be useful to the community as a whole we encourage you to record suggestions and criticism onto our Issues list so that the whole community can constructively contribute.

Grade conversions Back to contents

theCrag automatically converts grades between different grade systems according to the table below. You can set your preferred grade system for major climbing styles in your profile page, allowing you to look at any climbing area worldwide in the grade system you are most used to. theCrag does so by using an open ended and fine-grained internal grade conversion system with more than 500 grade levels.

Note the coloured Grade bands which are used throughout the site as a quick way to gauge the general level of difficulty of a route or area.

Trad and sport grade systems Back to contents

Band
Ewbanks
YDS
NCCS Scale
French
British Tech.
UIAA
South African
Old South African
Saxon
Finnish
Norwegian
Polish
Brazil Technical
Swedish
Beginner
Intermediate
Experienced
Expert
Elite
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
5.0
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.9
5.10a
5.10b
5.10c
5.10d
5.11a
5.11b
5.11c
5.11d
5.12a
5.12b
5.12c
5.12d
5.13a
5.13b
5.13c
5.13d
5.14a
5.14b
5.14c
5.14d
5.15a
5.15b
5.15c
5.15d
F4
F5
F6
F7
F8
F9
F10
F11
F12
F13
F14
F15
F16
1a
1a+
1b
1b+
1c
1c+
2a
2a+
2b
2b+
2c
2c+
3a
3a+
3b
3b+
3c
3c+
4a
4a+
4b
4b+
4c
4c+
5a
5a+
5b
5b+
5c
5c+
6a
6a+
6b
6b+
6c
6c+
7a
7a+
7b
7b+
7c
7c+
8a
8a+
8b
8b+
8c
8c+
9a
9a+
9b
9b+
9c
1a
1b
1c
2a
2b
2c
3a
3b
3c
4a
4b
4c
5a
5b
5c
6a
6b
6c
7a
7b
7c
1-
1
1+
2-
2
2+
3-
3
3+
4-
4
4+
5-
5
5+
6-
6
6+
7-
7
7+
8-
8
8+
9-
9
9+
10-
10
10+
11-
11
11+
12-
12
12+
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
A1
A2
A3
B1
B2
B3
C1
C2
C3
D1
D2
D3
E1
E2
E3
F1
F2
F3
G1
G2
G3
H1
H2
H3
I1
I2
I3
J1
J2
J3
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VIIa
VIIb
VIIc
VIIIa
VIIIb
VIIIc
IXa
IXb
IXc
Xa
Xb
Xc
XIa
XIb
XIc
XIIa
XIIb
XIIc
1-
1
1+
2-
2
2+
3-
3
3+
4-
4
4+
5-
5
5+
6-
6
6+
7-
7
7+
8-
8
8+
9-
9
9+
10-
10
10+
11-
11
11+
12-
12
12+
1-
1
1+
2-
2
2+
3-
3
3+
4-
4
4+
5-
5
5+
6-
6
6+
7-
7
7+
8-
8
8+
9-
9
9+
10-
10
10+
11-
11
11+
12-
12
12+
I-
I
I+
II-
II
II+
III-
III
III+
IV-
IV
IV+
V-
V
V+
VI-
VI
VI+
VI.1
VI.1+
VI.2
VI.2+
VI.3
VI.3+
VI.4
VI.4+
VI.5
VI.5+
VI.6
VI.6+
VI.7
VI.7+
VI.8
VI.8+
VI.9
VI.9+
I
Isup
II
IIsup
III
IIIsup
IV
IVsup
V
Vsup
VI
VIsup
VIIa
VIIb
VIIc
VIIIa
VIIIb
VIIIc
IXa
IXb
IXc
Xa
Xb
Xc
XIa
XIb
XIc
XIIa
XIIb
XIIc
1-
1
1+
2-
2
2+
3-
3
3+
4-
4
4+
5-
5
5+
6-
6
6+
7-
7
7+
8-
8
8+
9-
9
9+
10-
10
10+
11-
11
11+
12-
12
12+

Bouldering grade systems Back to contents

Band
V-Scale
B-Scale
S-Scale
P-Scale
Joshua Tree Scale
Fontainebleau
Annot B-Scale
Font Traverse
Beginner
Intermediate
Experienced
Expert
Elite
VB-
VB
VB+
V0-
V0
V0+
V1
V2
V3
V4
V5
V6
V7
V8
V9
V10
V11
V12
V13
V14
V15
V16
V17
B5.6
B5.7
B5.8
B5.9
B5.10
B5.10+
B1-
B1
B1+
B2-
B2
B2+
B3
S1-
S1
S1+
S2-
S2
S2+
S3-
S3
S3+
S4-
S4
S4+
S5-
S5
S5+
S6-
S6
S6+
P0
P1
P2
P3
P4
P5
P6
P7
P8
P9
P10
P11
P12
P13
P14
P15
P16
A-
A
A+
B-
B
B+
C-
C
C+
D-
D
D+
1A
1A+
1B
1B+
1C
1C+
2A
2A+
2B
2B+
2C
2C+
3A
3A+
3B
3B+
3C
3C+
4A
4A+
4B
4B+
4C
4C+
5A
5A+
5B
5B+
5C
5C+
6A
6A+
6B
6B+
6C
6C+
7A
7A+
7B
7B+
7C
7C+
8A
8A+
8B
8B+
8C
8C+
9A
9A+
9B
9B+
9C
9C+
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
B8
B9
B10
B11
B12
B13
B14
B15
B16
1A
1A+
1B
1B+
1C
1C+
2A
2A+
2B
2B+
2C
2C+
3A
3A+
3B
3B+
3C
3C+
4A
4A+
4B
4B+
4C
4C+
5A
5A+
5B
5B+
5C
5C+
6A
6A+
6B
6B+
6C
6C+
7A
7A+
7B
7B+
7C
7C+
8A
8A+
8B
8B+
8C
8C+
9A
9A+
9B
9B+
9C

Other grade systems Back to contents

Band
Aid
Aid
Aid
Alpine Ice
Water Ice
Mixed Rock/Ice
Ferrata Schall
Ferrata Num
Ferrata French
Beginner
Intermediate
Experienced
Expert
Elite
M0
M1
M2
M3
M4
M5
M6
M7
M8
M9
M10
M11
M12
A0
A0+
A1
A1+
A2
A2+
A3
A3+
A4
A4+
A5
A5+
A6
C0
C0+
C1
C1+
C2
C2+
C3
C3+
C4
C4+
C5
C5+
C6
AI1-
AI1
AI1+
AI2-
AI2
AI2+
AI3-
AI3
AI3+
AI4-
AI4
AI4+
AI5-
AI5
AI5+
AI6-
AI6
AI6+
AI7-
AI7
AI7+
AI8-
AI8
AI8+
WI1-
WI1
WI1+
WI2-
WI2
WI2+
WI3-
WI3
WI3+
WI4-
WI4
WI4+
WI5-
WI5
WI5+
WI6-
WI6
WI6+
WI7-
WI7
WI7+
WI8-
WI8
WI8+
M1
M2
M3
M4
M5
M6
M7
M8
M9
M10
M11
M12
A
B
C
D
E
F
1
2
3
4
5
6
F
PD
AD
D
TD
ED

If you would like programatic access to the grades and grade conversions through the Sharing and embeding (API). The programatic version of this table is available through the following API call:

https://www.thecrag.com/api/config/grade/system

Grade bands Back to contents

theCrag has segmented climb difficulty into 5 broad categories - Beginner, Intermediate, Experienced, Expert and Elite. These definitions are somewhat arbitrary, but they allow for a quick overview and have some statistical basis that was developed over the years.

There are two common area difficulty graphs used throughout theCrag, the grade band and dual grade band.

The grade band chart shows the relative number of climbs at the particular difficuly bands. This is shown at each area and gives you a quick summary of the area's relative difficulty.

The dual grade band shows also what grades people are climbing at an area, based on the number of ascents at each grade. Some areas may have a lot of hard climbs, but the easier climbs are climbed more often (eg Arapiles) and other areas have a lot of easier climbs, but people go there for the hard climbs (eg Grampians).

The table below gives a brief description of each band.

Beginner The level of difficulty for your first couple of days of climbing (seconding or top roping). Many people may achieve these grades on their first day of climbing. There are still some very scary and/or dangerous climbs at this level (eg Bard).
Intermediate Typical grades for people with less than a years climbing. Note that most people cannot climb this level on their first couple of days of climbing. Statistically speaking, most outdoor climbing is done in this band. A lot of experienced climbers end up backing off to this level as they enjoy their climbing into old age.
Experienced People can achieve these levels if they have been climbing fairly regularly for a couple of years. These grades are where the social climbers start becoming rare.
Expert You really need to be training in a focused way to climb at this level. Not so many people reach this level.
Elite You climb for a living, are sponsored and have a full time trainer and masseur looking after you. This is the best of the best. If you are normal, you would not have a hope of even dogging up one of these climbs.

How are grades assigned to routes? Back to contents

Routes have an assigned grade and a list of independent user and publisher grade contributions. The user and publisher grade contributions are displayed on the route page. The official grade of the route according to theCrag is given by the registered grade.

Please consider the assigned grade as the grade that has been accepted by the community. This may change over time.

Assigned grade Back to contents

The assigned grade is the official grade of the route, and is used throughout theCrag website and publications.

A assigned grade may have multiple components, for example:

  • A free climbing grade (5.12a) and an aid grade (A3), combined would read 5.12a A3.
  • British technical (4a) and adjectival (MS), combined would read MS 4a.

A route may have official grades from several different grading systems (eg in Thailand many routes have an official French and Australian grade). For example:

https://www.thecrag.com/climbing/thailand/krabi/route/17710201

The above route, 'Knights In White Satin' has a registered grade of 7b+ French and 26 Australian Ewbanks. Because the Thailand is assigned the French context the French grade will be shown on the site.

Once a route has a registered grade it can only be changed by an Editor and is not affected by subsequent user contributions.

Grade contributions Back to contents

Anybody may make a grade contribution. A climb may have several grade contributions from users and publishers.

When you add a new route, the grade you enter becomes your grade contribution (unless you are citing a publication, in which case in becomes a publisher contribution). For new routes your grade contribution also becomes the registered grade.

You may add your user grade contribution to an existing route using the update route details process. If the route already has a registered grade then this will not be effected (otherwise your contribution is used to start the registered grade).

Grade ranges Back to contents

Behind the scenes everything is a grade range with a minimum grade and maximum grade. Mostly people will use just one grade, but on occasions it is useful to use a grade range for a particular route (eg you may input 5.10a-b, which will be interpreted by the system as a grade range and displayed as 5.10a to 5.10b).

Grade ranges are absolutely necessary for grade conversions. Very few grade conversions match exactly there is usually overlap. For example 5.8 in the Yosemite Decimal System maps to both 15 and 16 in the Australian Ewbanks system.

Aid eliminates Back to contents

A route may originally be a 5.10b A4, then later somebody may climb it as a 5.11a A0, then later as a 5.12c. In this scenario the route should have the cleanest grade as its registered grade, but may have all the other grades listed as grade contributions.

Note we have plans to make some changes here to cater for multiple whole grades, so all aid eliminates can be created as alternate registered grades and available for selection when ticking.

Special rating systems Back to contents

You may use the YDS protection rating in your grade contribution or registered grade. For example 5.10d X.

On some pages the system does not display the mild ratings to avoid clutter.

Although not part of the registered grade you can include some additional rating systems in your grade contributions. These include:

  • Stars

If you add a , or to the end of your grade contribution the system will recognise this a star rating. See How stars work.

How are grades assigned to ascents? Back to contents

Currently when you log an ascent the ascent will automatically take up to two of route's registered grade components as the ascent grade. If there are two grade components (eg British Adjectival and Technical or Free and Aid) then both will be catered for. If there are more than two (eg Free, Aid and Protection), then one will be dropped.

A logged ascent has a primary grade and secondary grade independent of the route's grade. This means you may update your ascent to any grade you want, such as a different grading system or different grade to the route.

To adjust your ascent's grade after you have logged the ascent follow the following procedure:

  • Log in to theCrag.
  • Go to your dashboard page.
  • In the Logbook top level tab navigation click 'All your ascents' dropdown.
  • Look for the ascent you want to update. There is a down arrow on the right, click it then click the 'Edit' dropdown.
  • Select the new grades.

Note that ascent logging grades is a little restrictive and we plan to bring this in-line with the full route grade capability.

The minimum level of difficulty of the ascent grade and the route grade is used for Climber Performance Rating (CPR).

Grade contexts Back to contents

Our aim is for you to contribute grades as you see them in guidebooks and for the platform to be smart enough to work out what you mean.

Grade context meaning Back to contents

What does it mean if you type in the grade '5c'? If you were in Britain you would think it was the Experienced British grade 5c, but if you were in France you would think it was the Intermediate French grade 5c. If it was a bouldering route in Fontainebleau then you would think it is the Experienced Fontainebleau bouldering grade 5C. Interpretation of grades is dependent on where you are and the style of route, this is what we term grade context.

A Grade context is a way of the platform working out how to interpret potentially conflicting grades written in plain text, and we set a grade context typically at the country level.

A grade context is simply a priority list of which grade systems it should check first when matching a grade. For instance in Australia, you can use a French grade, but it will check it first against the locally used Ewbank, and V-Grade bouldering grade systems first, and then if it doesn't match it will check against all the other grade systems. The platform defines as few contexts as possible in order to eliminate conflicts. In general most countries can use the default context.

You may set the default context for any area which overrides the inherited area above. You may also set the context on a route.

Currently the system defines the following contexts:

Code Grade context Countries and Grade Systems
AU

Australian (Ewbanks ...)

Australian rating systems including Ewbanks and aid systems.

Countries: Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea

General grade systems: Ewbanks, V-Scale, Aid, Protection Rating

Additional ice systems: Mixed Rock/Ice

Additional via ferrata systems: Ferrata Schall, Ferrata Num, Ferrata French

Additional deep water solo systems: DWS Safe

BRZ

Brazillian

Brazillian

Countries: Brazil

General grade systems: Brazil Technical, Brazil General, Distance, Exposure

Additional ice systems: Mixed Rock/Ice

Additional boulder systems: Fontainebleau

Additional via ferrata systems: Ferrata Schall, Ferrata Num, Ferrata French

Additional deep water solo systems: DWS Safe

FB

Fontainebleau

Fontainebleau bouldering system used in european bouldering - same labels as French grading system, but different difficulty levels.

Countries:

General grade systems: Fontainebleau

Additional ice systems: Mixed Rock/Ice

Additional via ferrata systems: Ferrata Schall, Ferrata Num, Ferrata French

Additional deep water solo systems: DWS Safe

Additional traverse systems: Font Traverse

FIN

Finnish

Finnish

Countries: Finland

General grade systems: Finnish

Additional ice systems: Mixed Rock/Ice

Additional boulder systems: Fontainebleau

Additional via ferrata systems: Ferrata Schall, Ferrata Num, Ferrata French

Additional deep water solo systems: DWS Safe

FR

French

French rating systems including free, bouldering, aid and alpine systems.

Countries: Croatia, Egypt, France, Greece, Italy, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Madagascar, Malaysia, Morocco, Netherlands, Peru, Portugal, Russia, Serbia, Singapore, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, Vietnam

General grade systems: French, Annot B-Scale, V-Scale, IFAS, Aid, Aid, Ferrata Schall

Additional ice systems: Mixed Rock/Ice

Additional boulder systems: Fontainebleau, Annot B-Scale

Additional via ferrata systems: Ferrata Schall, Ferrata Num, Ferrata French

Additional deep water solo systems: DWS Safe

Additional traverse systems: Font Traverse

HK

Hong Kong

Hong Kong

Countries: Hong Kong

General grade systems: British Adj., British Tech., V-Scale, Aid, Aid

Additional ice systems: Mixed Rock/Ice

Additional via ferrata systems: Ferrata Schall, Ferrata Num, Ferrata French

Additional sport systems: French

Additional deep water solo systems: DWS Safe

NWG

Norwegian

Norwegian

Countries: Norway

General grade systems: Norwegian

Additional ice systems: Mixed Rock/Ice

Additional boulder systems: Fontainebleau

Additional via ferrata systems: Ferrata Schall, Ferrata Num, Ferrata French

Additional deep water solo systems: DWS Safe

POL

Polish

Polish

Countries: Poland

General grade systems: Polish

Additional ice systems: Mixed Rock/Ice

Additional boulder systems: Fontainebleau

Additional via ferrata systems: Ferrata Schall, Ferrata Num, Ferrata French

Additional deep water solo systems: DWS Safe

SA

South African

South African

Countries: Botswana, Kenya, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, Uganda

General grade systems: South African, Old South African, V-Scale, Aid, Aid

Additional ice systems: Mixed Rock/Ice

Additional boulder systems: Fontainebleau

Additional via ferrata systems: Ferrata Schall, Ferrata Num, Ferrata French

Additional deep water solo systems: DWS Safe

Additional aid systems: Aid, Aid

SWE

Swedish

Swedish

Countries: Sweden

General grade systems: Swedish

Additional ice systems: Mixed Rock/Ice

Additional boulder systems: Fontainebleau

Additional via ferrata systems: Ferrata Schall, Ferrata Num, Ferrata French

Additional deep water solo systems: DWS Safe

SX

Saxon

Saxon free rating systems.

Countries:

General grade systems: Saxon, Jumps

Additional ice systems: Mixed Rock/Ice

Additional boulder systems: Fontainebleau

Additional via ferrata systems: Ferrata Schall, Ferrata Num, Ferrata French

Additional deep water solo systems: DWS Safe

UIAA

UIAA

UIAA free rating system but also includes bouldering and aid systems.

Countries: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Montenegro, Slovakia

General grade systems: UIAA, V-Scale, Aid, Aid, Ferrata Schall

Additional ice systems: Mixed Rock/Ice

Additional boulder systems: Fontainebleau

Additional via ferrata systems: Ferrata Schall, Ferrata Num, Ferrata French

Additional deep water solo systems: DWS Safe

UK

British

British rating systems including technical, adjectival, bouldering and aid systems.

Countries: Ireland, Malta, United Kingdom

General grade systems: British Adj., British Tech., V-Scale, Aid, Aid

Additional ice systems: Mixed Rock/Ice

Additional via ferrata systems: Ferrata Schall, Ferrata Num, Ferrata French

Additional deep water solo systems: DWS Safe

US

American (YDS ...)

American rating systems including YDS, aid, bouldering, alpine and ice systems.

Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Armenia, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Fiji, Georgia, Ghana, Greenland, Guatemala, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Israel, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Lichtenstein, Mali, Mexico, Micronesia, Moldova, Myanmar, Nepal, New Caledonia, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Philippines, Romania, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Tonga, United Arab Emirates, United States of America, Venezuela, Yemen

General grade systems: Class, YDS, V-Scale, B-Scale, S-Scale, P-Scale, Joshua Tree Scale, Aid, Aid, NCCS Alpine Grade, Protection Rating, Alpine Ice, Water Ice, Mixed Rock/Ice, NCCS Scale, Ferrata Schall, DWS Safe

Additional boulder systems: Fontainebleau

Additional via ferrata systems: Ferrata Schall, Ferrata Num, Ferrata French

Force grading system Back to contents

You can force a grading system when you input a grade by starting with the grading system label followed by a colon then the grade. For example 'FR:6a+'. The table below shows grading system labels that you can use.

Label Rating system
UK British Adj.
FB_TRAV Font Traverse
BRZ Brazil Technical
FB Fontainebleau
VF_FR Ferrata French
SCHALL Ferrata Schall
CLS Class
BLDV V-Scale
AIDC Aid
NCCST NCCS Scale
DST Distance
NWG Norwegian
ANNOT Annot B-Scale
AUAID Aid
EXP Exposure
BRZ_DEG Brazil General
NCCS NCCS Alpine Grade
VF_NUM Ferrata Num
AICE Alpine Ice
IFAS IFAS
PROT Protection Rating
FR French
POL Polish
JUMP Jumps
AU Ewbanks
WICE Water Ice
UIAA UIAA
SA South African
YDS YDS
FIN Finnish
BLDS S-Scale
OLDSA Old South African
SWE Swedish
DWS_S DWS Safe
MIXED Mixed Rock/Ice
BLDB B-Scale
AID Aid
BLDP P-Scale
UKT British Tech.
BLDJT Joshua Tree Scale
SX Saxon

Examples Back to contents

The best way to explain how the system converts the plain text you enter into grades is to look at some examples.

(If you see a way of writing a grade in a guidebook then test it out and if it does not work then please contact us so we can enhance the system.)

Context Style Text entered Grade Comment
US Trad 5.12a
US Trad 5.12 The system has a grade system where grades are expressed as 5.12-, 5.12 and 5.12+.
US Trad 5.12+
US Trad 5.12a+ Note that + does not always form part of the official grade, in which case it is ignored.
US Trad 12a The system is able to work out common partial grades.
US Trad 12 Partial grades can be very dependent on the context (in US context this is 5.12, in AU context this is 12).
AU Trad 12 Compare to above example.
US Trad 5.12a-5.12c This is interpreted as a grade range.
US Trad 5.12a-b Common abbreviated grade ranges.
US Trad 5.12a/b The forward slash '/' is interpreted as an or, in which case the system assigns the highest single grade.
AU Trad 17/18
US Trad 5.10,5.12d,5.9 Commas used to indicate multi-pitch, in which case the system will assign the highest grade.
US Trad 5.9 S Protection rating is displayed as part of the grade.
US Trad 5.10a X,5.12 Multipitch may include protection rating.
US Trad 5.10a,5.10b M1,5.9 M4 Multipitch may include aid grades.
US Trad 5.9**

The contribution will also be attributed with . Learn more about How stars work.

FR Sport 5c The French grade.
UK Sport 5c The British technical grade.
FR Boulder 5C The Fontainebleau bouldering grade.
FR Boulder 5c The Fontainebleau bouldering grade can also be written in lower case.
UK Trad E2 5c The British adjectival and technical grade.
UK Trad D The British adjectival.
UK Trad Difficult Yup, according to the British adjectival system, difficult is a beginner's route - go figure. I think climbing developed faster than they could keep up.
AU Trad 19 Australian Ewbanks grade.
SA Trad 19 South African grade (compare to level of difficulty for an Australian Ewbanks grade 19 above).
AU Trad 21 (S) Australian Ewbanks grade with a sport route indicator. This is in for historical reasons (common for Australian guidebooks to use this notation), but because of it's potential confusion with the protection rating S we don't want it to be used anymore. For sport routes just tick the sport route indicator. Note the sport indicator must have brackets.
AU Trad 21 M2 Australian Ewbanks grade with an Australian aid grade.
AU Aid M2 Australian aid grade.
US Trad Class 2
US Trad Class IV
US Trad F6 NCCS Scale.
UIAA Trad 11- UIAA grade.
SA Trad D3 Old South African grade.
SX Trad VIIa Saxon grade.
US Trad 5.6A1+ Free plus Aid grade.
US Aid 5.6C1+ Free plus hammerless Aid grade.
US Aid A1+ Straight Aid grade.
US Boulder V4 Vermin V-Scale for bouldering.
US Boulder B5.6 The little more obscure Expanded Gill B-Scale for bouldering.
US Boulder B2- And another B-Scale.
US Boulder S4- Bouldering Smith Rocks S-Scale.
US Boulder P10 Bouldering Phoenix P-Scale.
US Boulder C+ Bouldering Joshua Tree Scale.
AU Boulder V0+ But really the bouldering V-Scale is accepted everywhere, so just use that.
US Ice AI5- Alpine Ice.
US Ice WI5- Water Ice.
US Ice M3 Mixed rock and ice.
FR Trad PD IFAS (International French Adjectival System).
US Alpine VI National Climbing Classification System (NCCS) Alpine Grade.
US Alpine VI 5.11c A2+ Alpine route with free and aid climbing.
UIAA Via ferrata E Via ferrata Schall.
UIAA Via ferrata 4 Via ferrata numeric.
UIAA Via ferrata TD Via ferrata french.
UIAA Via ferrata Difficile Via ferrata french using words.
AU Sport 12 # i think You can add comments to your grade contribution by using '#'.
FR Sport UKT:5c+ You can force a grading system in a foreign context by appending the gradings system label (note that it must be the explicit grading system label, not a context label).
HK Sport 5c Hong Kong uses French grading system for sport routes.
HK Trad 5c Hong Kong uses UK technical system for trad routes.
HK Boulder 5c Hong Kong uses UK technical system for boulder routes.
UIAA Boulder 5 UIAA uses UIAA system for bouldering sometimes.
UIAA Boulder 5c UIAA uses Fontainebleau system for bouldering sometimes.
UK Sport FR:4c 4c would normally covert to the British Technical grade in UK context, however the override sets the system to French.

Try it yourself Back to contents

Context:

Style:

Your test input:

System output:

Grades in a gym Back to contents

Some gyms decided to use their own grade system, often using colors or icons to denominate relative difficulty. On theCrag, gyms can opt to use their own color codes or any other available grade system. See Gym Solution by theCrag for more information.

In case gyms opted for a color scheme, theCrag color scheme does not apply to their routes in theCrag, but rather the color specified by the gym for that route.

Country context's Back to contents

Default contexts are set at the country level but can be overridden at any area below the country. For example Germany has a UIAA context, but there are crags which override to a Saxon (SX) context. The following table shows the current system settings for country context.

Code Country Context Number of routes
AF Afghanistan US 2
AX Aland Islands US 0
AL Albania US 64
DZ Algeria US 2
AS American Samoa US 0
AD Andorra FR 0
AO Angola US 0
AI Anguilla US 0
AG Antigua and Barbuda US 0
AR Argentina US 1,116
AM Armenia US 103
AW Aruba US 0
AU Australia AU 67,429
AT Austria UIAA 13,070
AZ Azerbaijan UIAA 0
BS Bahamas US 0
BH Bahrain US 0
BD Bangladesh US 0
BB Barbados US 0
BY Belarus UIAA 0
BE Belgium UIAA 772
BZ Belize UIAA 0
BJ Benin US 0
BM Bermuda US 0
BT Bhutan US 15
BO Bolivia US 30
BA Bosnia and Herzegovina US 153
BW Botswana SA 6
BV Bouvet Island US 0
BR Brazil BRZ 2,914
IO British Indian Ocean Territory UK 0
BN Brunei Darussalam US 0
BG Bulgaria US 1,383
BF Burkina Faso US 0
BI Burundi US 0
KH Cambodia US 24
CM Cameroon US 0
CA Canada US 14,468
CV Cape Verde US 0
KY Cayman Islands US 0
CF Central African Republic US 0
TD Chad US 0
CL Chile US 1,016
CN China US 2,664
CX Christmas Island US 0
CC Cocos (Keeling) Islands US 0
CO Colombia US 633
KM Comoros US 0
CD Congo Democratic Republic US 0
CG Congo Republic US 0
CK Cook Islands US 0
CR Costa Rica US 113
CI Cote d'Ivoire US 0
HR Croatia FR 2,022
CU Cuba US 0
CY Cyprus US 0
CZ Czech Republic UIAA 44,945
DK Denmark UIAA 249
DJ Djibouti US 0
DM Dominica US 0
DO Dominican Republic US 0
EC Ecuador US 1
EG Egypt FR 26
SV El Salvador US 1
GQ Equatorial Guinea US 0
ER Eritrea US 0
EE Estonia US 0
ET Ethiopia US 0
FK Falkland Islands US 0
FO Faroe Islands US 0
FJ Fiji US 2
FI Finland FIN 238
FR France FR 43,559
GF French Guiana FR 0
PF French Polynesia FR 0
TF French Southern Territories FR 0
GA Gabon US 0
GM Gambia US 0
GE Georgia US 170
DE Germany UIAA 65,582
GH Ghana US 33
GI Gibraltar US 0
GR Greece FR 6,964
GL Greenland US 28
GD Grenada US 0
GP Guadeloupe US 0
GU Guam US 0
GT Guatemala US 66
GG Guernsey US 0
GN Guinea US 0
GW Guinea-Bissaau US 0
GY Guyana US 0
HT Haiti US 0
HM Heard and McDonald Islands US 0
HN Honduras US 0
HK Hong Kong HK 1,369
HU Hungary US 218
IS Iceland US 148
IN India US 429
ID Indonesia US 183
IR Iran US 115
IQ Iraq US 0
IE Ireland UK 897
IM Isle of Man US 0
IL Israel US 993
IT Italy FR 24,622
JM Jamaica US 0
JP Japan US 1,586
JE Jersey US 0
JO Jordan US 37
KZ Kazakhstan US 63
KE Kenya SA 91
KI Kiribati US 0
KW Kuwait US 0
KG Kyrgyzstan FR 10
LA Laos FR 442
LV Latvia US 0
LB Lebanon US 9
LS Lesotho SA 36
LR Liberia US 0
LY Libya US 0
LI Lichtenstein US 10
LT Lithuania US 0
LU Luxembourg FR 156
MO Macau US 0
MK Macedonia FR 152
MG Madagascar FR 86
MW Malawi US 0
MY Malaysia FR 509
MV Maldives US 0
ML Mali US 2
MT Malta UK 593
MH Marshall Islands US 0
MQ Martinique US 0
MR Mauritania US 0
MU Mauritius US 0
YT Mayotte US 0
MX Mexico US 2,664
FM Micronesia US 1
MD Moldova US 1
MC Monaco FR 0
MN Mongolia US 0
ME Montenegro UIAA 313
MS Montserrat US 0
MA Morocco FR 423
MZ Mozambique US 0
MM Myanmar US 25
NA Namibia SA 138
NR Nauru US 0
NP Nepal US 3
NL Netherlands FR 59
NC New Caledonia US 8
NZ New Zealand AU 11,401
NI Nicaragua US 0
NE Niger US 0
NG Nigeria US 0
NU Niue US 0
NF Norfolk Island US 0
KP North Korea US 0
MP Northern Marina Islands US 0
NO Norway NWG 5,279
OM Oman US 11
PK Pakistan US 38
PW Palau US 0
PS Palestine US 0
PA Panama US 5
PG Papua New Guinea AU 1
PY Paraguay US 0
PE Peru FR 521
PH Philippines US 237
PN Pitcairn Island US 0
PL Poland POL 725
PT Portugal FR 358
PR Puerto Rico US 0
QA Qatar US 0
RE Reunion US 0
RO Romania US 438
RU Russia FR 1,348
RW Rwanda US 0
SH Saint Helena US 0
KN Saint Kitts and Nevis US 0
LC Saint Lucia US 0
PM Saint Pierre and Miquelon US 0
VC Saint Vincent and the Grenadines US 0
WS Samoa US 0
SM San Marino US 0
ST Sao Tome and Principe US 0
SA Saudi Arabia US 0
SN Senegal US 0
RS Serbia FR 662
SC Seychelles US 0
SL Sierra Leone US 0
SG Singapore FR 109
SK Slovakia UIAA 1,499
SI Slovenia FR 2,821
SB Solomon Islands US 0
SO Somalia US 0
ZA South Africa SA 7,021
GS South Georgia US 0
KR South Korea US 2,512
ES Spain FR 27,069
LK Sri Lanka US 12
SD Sudan US 0
SR Suriname US 0
SJ Svalbard US 0
SZ Swaziland US 0
SE Sweden SWE 3,185
CH Switzerland FR 21,318
SY Syria US 0
TW Taiwan US 575
TJ Tajikistan US 6
TZ Tanzania US 0
TH Thailand FR 1,403
TG Togo US 0
TK Tokelau US 0
TO Tonga US 11
TT Trinidad and Tobago US 0
TN Tunisia FR 38
TR Turkey FR 1,743
TM Turkmenistan US 0
TC Turks and Caicos Islands US 0
TV Tuvalu US 0
UG Uganda SA 126
UA Ukraine FR 3,174
AE United Arab Emirates US 34
GB United Kingdom UK 27,068
UM United States Minor Outlying Islands US 0
US United States of America US 74,298
UY Uruguay US 0
UZ Uzbekistan US 0
VU Vanuatu US 0
VA Vatican City US 0
VE Venezuela US 74
VN Vietnam FR 252
VI Virgin Islands US 0
WF Wallis and Futuna US 0
EH Western Sahara US 0
YE Yemen US 5
ZM Zambia US 0
ZW Zimbabwe US 0